Daily Archives: January 12, 2009

HE’S A SON OF THE SOUTH

louis_kids

Google Alerts is my pal, sending me news of Lester, Ruby, Big Sid, and Louis, whenever their names crop up online.  In Louis’s case, the Alert sometimes has nothing to do with music — there are schools, an airport, and a stadium named for him.  This latest bit of Armstrong-related news was surprising and more. 

A newspaper profile of a man named Herb Armstrong, a handsome Australian singer, appears in the Redcliffe & Bayside Herald.  That newspaper serves the area around Brisbane, including the colorfully-named Deception Bay

I found Herb’s brief sketch of his ancestry intriguing: 

The timbre in his voice is, perhaps, unsurprising.  Herb is a grandson of the late, great jazz musician Louis Armstrong.  “I’m a love-child,” he says.  Herb’s mother Decina met Louis Armstrong’s son, a drummer, in New Orleans.    They fell in love and the result was Herb.

None of the biographies of Louis have documented any children.  Perhaps Herb’s story should be included in the planned Forrest Whitaker film on Louis’s life?  Comments, anyone?

You can read the original profile:

http://redcliffe-and-bayside-herald.whereilive.com.au/lifestyle/story/herb-armstrongs-wonderful-world/

 
Advertisements

“ONE HOUR” WITH HUMPH AND HENRI CHAIX

YouTube is full of moving surprises: this is a 1982 quartet performance by Humphrey Lyttelton (tpt), Henri Chaix (p), John Treichler (b), and Gerry Ceccaroni (dr).  Other concert clips feature Lyttelton, Chaix, and Acker Bilk (cl) with the Harlem Ramblers Dixieland Band from Zurich.  (www.harlemramblers.ch)

Lyttelton was so multi-talented, in and out of music, that people sometimes forget that he was one of the great lyrical trumpeters of the last century: he could sing a ballad in a deeply feeling way.  And Chaix, also now gone, was a wonderful soloist and superb accompanist. 

James P. Johnson’s seriously pretty song is often flattened out through bands that trot trhough it at a medium-tempo.  Humph and Henri take its sweet sentiments to heart — which is, after all, what this music is all about.

When Vic Dickenson used to sing “One Hour” and get to the title phrase, he would emphatically hold up two fingers, letting us know that what he wanted to accomplish would take twice the time.  In his honor, why not watch this performance twice?  It deserves no less.