Daily Archives: March 14, 2009

YEARS GONE BY

Here are two of William P. Gottlieb’s less known but highly evocative photographs from the collection now held by the Library of Congress.  First, a wonderful trio — three musicians who never found themselves in a recording studio, although the pianist and clarinetist joined forces, however briefly, for a famous and elusive 1936 radio broadcast called “A Demonstration of Swing.”  Here they are, circa 1939, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. — Joe Marsala, Zutty Singleton, and Teddy Wilson:

marsala-teddy-zutty-np-club-dc-40-wp-gottlieb

And this must have been a very sedate night at Jimmy Ryan’s in 1947 — featuring Hot Lips Page, J. C. Higginbotham, Bud Freeman, and Freddie Moore, with — no doubt — other stomping compatriots out of the range of the photograph.  Moore looks atypically somber, but I am sure that he was alone in that regard: 

lips-bud-higgy-f-moore-ryans-47-wpgottlieb

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JOEL PRESS, SWING EXPLORER

joel-press

Photograph by Herb Snitzer

When I get a boxful of compact discs to review from CADENCE — the honest jazz magazine* — I am full of anticipation.  It’s a jazz birthday party in my apartment, as I find a knife to cut through the tape and unwrap the newspaper protecting the CDs.  Now, my first reactions aren’t always trustworthy.  Sometimes a CD I greet with glee turns out to be dull.  And occasionally something that looks tepid jumps right out of the chamber into my heart. 

This time, the box included a new CD by saxophonist Joel Press (known far and wide in Newton, Massachusetts and the Boston jazz scene) and pianist Kyle Aho.  It’s called UNTYING THE STANDARDS (Cadence Jazz Records 1204) and I admire it tremendously — for the way it balances “traditionalism” (the loving respect for the original melodies and a seductive rhythmic pulse) and “freedom” (brave explorations outside and inside).  I expect I will have more to say about this CD soon. 

But, for the moment, I would urge you to visit Joel’s site — www.joelpress.com. — to see a video clip of him blowing the blues with a purring tone and high emotional intensity, rocking back and forth as if caught wholly by jazz.  And you can read his own reminiscences of musicians and scenes past, although he is no museum exhibit himself.  In addition, you can read my own 2006 review of his CD, HOW’S THE HORN TREATING YOU? — where I couldn’t restrain my enthusiasm.  He’s someone you ought to know.  And I’m going back to my slow savoring of his new CD — an aesthetic meal too rich to be gobbled up in a sitting.

*This isn’t the place to launch into polemic, because I wrote this post to praise Joel Press — but I mean “honest” in that CADENCE separates the advertisements and the reviews, which is not typical of jazz magazines.  If editors of other magazines wish to respond to this and say why a glowing review on page 8 and an ad on page 9 poses no conflict of interest as they see it, I would be happy to discuss the issue with them in this blog.