Daily Archives: January 14, 2010

SEND JOE BOUGHTON SOME LOVE

The man in this photograph is listening intently.  He always does. 

Joe Boughton is a truly intent listener and serious jazz fan.  And more.   

His name will be familiar to many of my readers here and abroad.  Joe’s been producing records on the JUMP label for some years now, and has made it possible for the “Doctor Jazz” series of broadcasts on the Storyville label.  He’s also a devout collector of Hot Music — his idols being Johnny Windhurst, Ruby Braff, Bobby Hackett, Eddie Condon, Lou McGarity and the rest.  He loves those songs that have been unjustly forgotten — beautiful melodies. 

But Joe’s been one of those rare jazz-lovers who puts his energies (and money) where his passions are — by producing a series of jazz parties for more than twenty years — at Conneaut Lake and more recently at Chautauqua, New York.  I’ve been lucky enough to go to the Jazz at Chautauqua weekend parties since 2004 — and everything’s set for Jazz at Chautauqua 2010, September 16-19, 2010.  I’ll provide more details about that as soon as I know them.

But Joe’s in the hospital at the moment with some serious health issues. 

If you’ve ever heard and enjoyed one of the Storyville CDs, or one of the JUMP issues, or if you’ve been to one of Joe’s jazz parties, please send Joe an email or a card to help him along.  Friendly affection means so much when you’re feeling poorly.

Thanks, on behalf of Joe, his family, and the music he continues to foster – – –

Emails to Joe (in care of his son, Bill): bjboughton@aol.com        

To send cards or letters to Joe: 

Joe Boughton, c/o Sarah Holt,  401 Byllesby Ave.    Meadville, PA 16335.

And please pass the information along to your jazz friends.

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ADRIAN ROLLINI ON FILM, 1948

The song is THE GIRL WITH THE LIGHT BLUE HAIR — I assume a play on THE MAID WITH THE FLAXEN HAIR — performed by Rollini, vibes and tubular bells (on which he demonstrates great dexterity), Allan Hanlon, guitar; George Hnida, bass.  It comes to us through the courtesy of “lindyhoppers” on YouTube, who is indebted to the late Tom Faber, Dutch discographer of Rollini.

Musically, I admit it wouldn’t be my first choice — Rollini on bass sax in 1934 is impressive although brief, and I’d rather have seen him in a hotter context.  But this will have to do until more of the real thing surfaces!

JAMMIN’ AT NICK’S: Jan. 11, 2010

On January 10, 2010, the energetic Rae Ann Berry captured these performances by the San Francisco Traditional Jazz Foundation Staff and Directors Band — jamming at Nick’s at Rockaway Beach in Pacifica, California.  It wasn’t the Nick’s of “sizzling steaks” and fabled memory, where Eddie Condon and his friends played before Eddie decided to open his own club in 1946, but the ambiance was the same.  In fact, both selections — SUNDAY and AM I BLUE? — are played at those nice medium tempos that musicians of a certain age and musical education associate with Condon.  And the solos — compact and eloquent — would have pleased him greatly. 

The players are Bob Schulz, cornet; Bill Carter, clarinet; Marty Eggers, piano; Bill Reinhart, bass; Scott Anthony, guitar; and Virginia Tichenor, drums.  It’s possible, if you get into the right mindset, to imagine — in your mind’s ear — that this is a session for Commodore or Decca, with Bob’s serious, flexible lead (Marsala, Max, or Muggsy), Bill’s curlicues (reminiscent of Pee Wee, Cless, or Marsala) and a strong rhythm section driven by Scott’s swinging guitar and Marty’s Stacyish piano.  And — with apologies to the dozen fine trombonists I know — the simple two-man frontline is eager, dancing, and light on its feet.

Ignore the dancers; ignore the conversation: the music’s delightful.  No one was embarking on a studious repertory recreation: they just got in the spirit and stayed there.  All hail!  (And Rae Ann has posted another substantial handful of performances by this band with guest singer Pat Yankee, doing old favorites and Hot Five tunes.  Rewarding stuff!)