Daily Archives: February 10, 2010

BUT WAIT! THERE’S MORE!

More from the New El Dorado Jazz Band — at the Pismo, California, Dixieland Society “Sounds of Mardi Gras,” on February 6, 2010 — with Hal Smith (washboard), Clint Baker (clarinet, banjo, vocal), Marc Caparone (trumpet), Howard Miyata (trombone), Mike Baird (clarinet), Carl Sonny Leyland (piano), Katie Cavera (banjo), Georgia Korba (bass).  Romping, one and all, and recorded by the apparently tireless Rae Ann Berry. 

Here’s ALEXANDER’S RAGTIME BAND, with the verse:

Some mournful funk reminiscent of Bunk Johnson — STORYVILLE BLUES:

And the song W.C. Handy claimed as his own, named for a rocketing train, OLE MISS:

And a wonderful oddity — the Fifties pop song (think Nat Cole) MONA LISA, which was a real favorite for the New Orleans musicians, including George Lewis.  Incidentally, this clip takes a minute before the video portion appears, so do not adjust your set:

Wonderful solos and ensemble drive — who could ask for more?  And the second or third time you watch these clips, drinking in the music, you may find yourself observing the dancers off to the left of the stage.  There are several well-behaved couples, but the person who drew me was a young woman with a cap on and a sleeveless blouse.  Leaping like a Dixieland bunny, she didn’t need a partner to express her joy in the music.

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THE 1932 MOTEN BAND RETURNS!

The recordings that Bennie Moten’s Kansas City Orchestra did in the Victor studios in Camden, New Jersey, are sacred music to jazz listeners.  How could they be otherwise?  Riffs by Eddie Durham, extraordinary playing by Bill Basie, Walter Page, Ben Webster, Eddie Barefield, and Hot Lips Page. 

This video clip of Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks storming through TOBY at the February 2010 Central Illinois Jazz Festival is as close as we’ll get to recapturing that version of Hot Nirvana. 

It was captured by “tdub1941” of YouTube and appears there by special permission of Mr. Giordano himself. 

The hardest-working men in jazz here are Jon-Erik Kellso, Mike Ponella, Jim Fryer, Peter Anderson, Dan Block, Dan Levinson, Andy Stein, Peter Yarin, Ken Salvo, Vince, and Arnie Kinsella. 

Now do you believe in reincarnation?

Yeah, men!

Visit “tdub1941” for more from this same concert (Jelly Roll Morton’s BOOGABOO, Ellington’s OLD MAN BLUES, Cliff Jackson’s THE TERROR, several versions of SUGAR FOOT STOMP, and Jimmie Lunceford’s JAZZNOCHRACY) as well as a host of live jazz delights.

NEW EL DORADO JAZZ BAND 2010: MARDI GRAS COMES EARLY!

Thanks to the energetic Rae Ann Berry, who took her nimble video camera to Fresno, California on February 6, 2010, for the Sounds of Mardi Gras (sponsored by the Fresno Dixieland Society), here are some lively videos of the New El Dorado Jazz Band, co-led by Hal Smith (on washboard) and Clint Baker (clarinet, banjo, vocals, and more) with Howard Miyata on trombone, Marc Caparone on trumpet, Mike Baird on clarinet, Katie Cavera on banjo, Carl Sonny Leyland on piano, Georgia Korba on bass — with a guest appearances by singer Dawn Lambeth and the multi-talented Jeff Hamilton

Here they are on a romping BIG CHIEF BATTLE AXE, which Dawn once told me they called (privately) BIG CHEAP CADILLAC, a title I much prefer.  Now the secret is out!

Here’s SNAG IT, a wonderful evocation of New Orleans – Chicago funk:

Marty Bloom’s improvisation on the theme of jazz sorrow, MELANCHOLY (with the verse):

Are you prey to violent urges?  SHAKE IT AND BREAK IT might be the right theme music:

Jelly Roll Morton’s WININ’ BOY BLUES, at a splendid tempo, with Carl hilariously swerving around the more erotic lyrics not once but twice (send a quarter to this blog by email for the missing lines, if you’re over eighteen):

And a romping ORIENTAL MAN (which I would bet has wonderfully archaic and unpopular lyrics):

Here’s a delicious YOU’RE DRIVING ME CRAZY — even though Dawn’s microphone lets her down, the combination of her creamy legato approach and the band’s Louis / Moten riffs is irresistible:

In tribute to Papa Ray Ronnei, here’s his original, SALTY BUBBLE:

Here’s YOU ALWAYS HURT THE ONE YOU LOVE — a wonderful song but bad advice in personal relationships.  Howard’s shifted over to the massive helicon, and Jeff Hamilton sits in on trombone (not his usual drums or piano — who knew?):

Carl Sonny Leyland can certainly rock the blues, as he does here — see how Hal Smith is enjoying the tempo even before the band joins in for SONNY’S BLUES:

And a nearly dangerous ONE SWEET LETTER FROM YOU, with Howard and Jeff continuing.  This band delivers the mail for sure. 

This band has recorded a CD for Clint’s BURGUNDY STREET RECORDS: if you’re lucky enough to see members of the band on gigs, I’m sure they’ll have some, and Hal Smith promises that it will soon be available through his website.  (http://www.halsmithmusic.com/hals_cdpage.html.)  I’m buying some copies! 

Does anyone have the lyrics to ORIENTAL MAN?  Or the original sheet music to share?

P.P.S.  For no reasons aside from personal pleasure, I’d like to know the “reach” of this blogpost.  Who’s watching these clips from far, far away?  A prize to the most distant viewer . . . !