CADENCE, RESOUNDING

I’ve mentioned CADENCE Magazine often — but perhaps not often enough — in these pages.  It has a brand-new website, http://www.cadencemagazine.com., which I urge you to visit. 

Candor requires that I say I have written reviews for the magazine for a number of years.  But I would applaud CADENCE even if they had never encouraged me to have my say.  It is the only honest jazz magazine I know . . . which sounds both irascible and contentious, but is true.  I recall that CODA did not accept advertising, but it is now defunct. 

All the other jazz journals I am aware of accept, encourage, and perhaps solicit advertising, and it is hard to imagine the situation where a reviewer might be allowed to say that the new CD by the Blenheim Palace Hot Boys was terrible if the BPHB had paid for an ad on the facing page. 

CADENCE has advertising, it is true, but it is kept to a separate section in the way that the new puppy might be kept in the kitchen.  And — as a reviewer — I have always been asked to tell the truth, and if the truth was impolitely stated, no one suggested that I could benefit from a course in good manners. 

Editor Bob Rusch is one of the great men in support of creative improvised music, and some of the most rewarding discs I know have emerged precisely because he has put his money where his beliefs are.  All this is long prelude to my happily drawing your attention to the site — as a way of encouraging you to consider subscribing to the magazine. 

My most traditionally-minded readers will at first think that the names they see in the sample pages are obscure, but (for instance) vibraphonist Mark Sherman is on Dan Block’s splendid new Ellington CD . . . and everyone is obscure to someone.  I have written about the most delightfully old-fashioned New Orleans jazz in CADENCE’s pages, so even before I wrote for the magazine, I was a happy reader. 

Check it out!

2 responses to “CADENCE, RESOUNDING

  1. If all jazz magazines were like Cadence, you couldn’t find jazz CDs advertised in any Jazz magazine. How does that make sense?

  2. Sorry, Bob — I respect you a great deal, but I must disagree. How can you respect a favorable review of X when there’s an ad for X on the facing page? Please don’t expect me to be so optimistic as to assume that the editorial departments and advertising departments don’t talk to each other over lunch. And, from personal experience, I have been discouraged from writing candid (read: unfavorable) reviews of certain CDs for now-defunct jazz magazines because “they don’t advance the cause of jazz”; I wrote a more mild-mannered review and then saw it printed near to an ad for that same CD. I am greatly in favor of finding ads for CDs but not when their proximity discourages the kind of candor that CADENCE encourages. Yours most respectfully! MS

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