Daily Archives: April 18, 2011

JAMES P. JOHNSON RARITIES

from the pages of eBay . . .

Recorded by Red and Miff’s Stompers and featured on Broadway!

Has anyone heard this?

I’d never noticed the superfluous apostrophe before — but a James P. military march is something to marvel at (a patriotic precursor to UNCLE SAMMY, HERE I AM?)

Recorded in 1929, I believe.

“Five Descriptive Negro Songs,” published by Perry Bradford, Inc.

Familiar as a very early piano roll performance.

Fifty cents!  Did James P. (who might have thought boogie-woogie monotonous) write these pieces?  I know he recorded one or two boogie-woogie originals for Blue Note and Asch, but these titles are (typically) not familiar.

Yes, that is the correct title for this Novelette.

Not only an ambitious composition, but the soundtrack for the film of the same name.

I’ve been collecting these images from eBay for a few weeks — and they provoke mixed feelings.  I’m delighted that someone so earnestly collected James P. Johnson’s sheet music, a little sorry that it’s being transferred from one collector to another (it would be nice to see and hear these pieces) but grateful that we can see these images.

LEE WILEY SENDS HER LOVE, 1958

Even if your name isn’t Bob, I think you can safely enjoy this rare artifact:

INSPIRATIONS at THE EAR INN (April 17, 2011)

While Jon-Erik Kellso and Matt Munisteri were finishing up what I hope was a rewarding weekend at the 2011 Atlanta Jazz Festival, the EarRegulars kept swinging happily in their absence — at The Ear Inn last night (Sunday, April 17, 2011 — at 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City).

The quartet was made up of old friends and musical colleagues — people who had a lot to say to each other on their instruments: Danny Tobias, cornet; Dan Block, clarinet and tenor saxophone; Chris Flory, guitar; Frank Tate, bass.

The music was playful and conversational: the band evoked the past (the 1938 Basie band, an imagined 1944 Keynote session, a Vanguard record date) while reminding us at every turn that there were four living musicians creating beauty in the here and now.  In each of these performances, you’ll see and hear casual splendor: the inventive lines and big sound of Frank Tate, who plays the string bass as it wants to be played (no manic guitar runs for him); the irresistible rhythmic surge of Chris Flory, his lines chiming; Danny Tobias’s subtle mastery — he never plays a superfluous note, and although he’s deeply grounded in the tradition of Buck Clayton and Ruby Braff, you’d lose all your bets trying to predict where his next phrase will land; the fierce lyricism of Dan Block, lemony on clarinet, yearning on tenor — a man inseparable from the phrases he creates.

Melodies everywhere!

Pay attention! as Jake Hanna used to say — especially to the conversations between Danny and Dan, uplifting interludes in several performances.

LINGER AWHILE isn’t played that much by contemporary bands, but Bill Coleman, Dicky Wells, and Lester Young had a good time with it some decades back:

Some cautious optimism with SOMETIMES I’M HAPPY at an easy rocking tempo:

A good old good one, EVERYBODY LOVES MY BABY:

Happiness is on everyone’s mind on a Sunday night at The Ear Inn, so why not play I WANT TO BE HAPPY:

And to cool the room down, a swinging JADA:

Cherish these sessions!  They’ve been going on for nearly four years . . . come visit while this music is in the air . . . .

THIS WEEK: TED BROWN / BRAD LINDE QUARTET (April 21 and 23, 2011)

The wonderful cross-generational jazz conversation of tenor saxophonists Ted Brown and Brad Linde will be returning to New York City for two gigs.

On Thursday, April 21, they will be appearing from 7:30 -9:30 PM at Miles’ Cafe, 212 East 52nd Street (on the third floor: 212-371-3657) with alto saxophonist Sarah Hughes, bassist Joe Solomon, and drummer Taro Okamoto.

On Saturday, April 23, Ted, Brad, bassist Murray Wall, and Taro will be playing at Tomi Jazz, 239 East 53rd Street (between Second and Third Avenues) — slightly below street level (646-497-1254) from 8 – 10:30 PM.

Here’s a video excerpt from an intriguing interview with Ted Brown about what Lennie Tristano taught him and others:

and here are Brad Linde and Dan Tepfer playing MARIE:

Both of those admirable videos are produced by “MaltShopPictures” — visit their YouTube channel for more.

And here’s my own recording of this quartet’s exploration of SWEET AND LOVELY at their previous gig at Tomi Jazz:

Carpe diem, dear readers!