Daily Archives: October 13, 2011

MAYA HED’S PHOTOGRAPHY: ON EXHIBIT

I don’t think I’ll make it to Tel Aviv for Maya Hed’s wonderful photography of musicians and other singular creatures, but I would encourage anyone in that neighborhood to visit: her work shines the light in unusual corners.  No cliches and many surprises.

WITH YOUR HELP . . . CADENCE MAGAZINE LIVES ON!

Since 2003, I have written for CADENCE — a truly independent journal of creative improvised music — and I was heartbroken when I heard it might cease publication at the end of the year.  It gives me great pleasure to print this letter from the magazine’s new publisher:

Dear Cadence Magazine Subscribers:

Hello, my name is David Haney.  I have been a subscriber to Cadence Magazine.  I am also a pianist and composer.  Some of you may have read reviews of my music in Cadence.  Over the past eleven years, I have successfully worked with Cadence to complete 14 albums for C.I.M.P. Records and Cadence Jazz Records. Recording for Cadence/CIMP has been a great boon and I have always appreciated Cadence‘s non-commercial approach.

I now face my most daunting task: to maintain the standards of excellence established by the previous publishers, and to steer Cadence toward a new generation of readers in a viable format that ensures the future of Cadence, the Independent Journal of Creative Improvised Music.  The content will remain the same, including columns and reviews from many of the existing Cadence writers.  The format will change to include an online site hosting Cadence Magazine plus an annual print edition.  The new Cadence contains a few new features such as “Jazz Stories – A Video History”; video interviews with living jazz masters.  There is also a new section targeting higher educational needs with resources such as lesson plans, crosswords, and contests.

I am excited at this new endeavor and hope you will be too.  With over 25 years experience in magazine publishing, I have dealt with many of the same difficulties that Cadence has experienced.

I am ready to go.  I do need your help though. Cadence is a community and in this spirit, I need the readership to step forward.  We need financial contributors and we need you to renew your subscription as soon as possible.  We are accepting subscription pre-orders for the January 2012 launch date.

CADENCE MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION PRICES (includes First-Class shipping):

Single subscription (online plus annual PRINT edition):

One year: $65 / Outside USA: $70

Two years: $120 / Outside USA: $130

Annual PRINT edition only (without online features):

One year: $30 / Outside USA: $35

Two years: $55 / Outside USA: $65

College and institutional subscriptions: multiple users can access Cadence Magazine online.  Order also includes two copies of the print edition.

One year: $300, multi-year discounts available.

See the link at WWW.CADENCEMAGAZINE.COM

Or send your contributions and orders to:

CADENCE MAGAZINE, P.O. BOX 282, RICHLAND, OR 97870

Contact us by email at CADENCEMAGAZINE@GMAIL.COM

or call (315) 289-1444

We also need a host of volunteers and contributors.  We are seeking photographers, writers, reviewers, artists, proof-readers, transcribers, “Short Takes” correspondents and more.  I invite you to lend your talents to the historic magazine and join us in chronicling jazz history.

Call me if you have questions (315-289-1444).  I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

David

A comment from JAZZ LIVES: I don’t think I spend that much energy asking or telling my readers how they should spend their money.  I think it would be impudent of me to do so, unless I could say, “This is something that gives great value and enlightenment for your dollar(s).”  CADENCE is and has been just that way: honest in an environment where honesty isn’t always present; witty, sharp, full of feeling and perception.  And I would say this if I were not writing for it and hoping to write for it more in future.  It deserves your support.

“A GOOD TIME WAS HAD BY ALL”: EMILY ASHER’S GARDEN PARTY at RADEGAST (Sept. 27, 2011)

Emily Asher certainly knows how to throw a party.  And her brilliance isn’t a matter of laying in huge quantities of blue corn chips and IPA, nor is it because of those cookies she bakes.  In fact, Emily comes to the party with little except her trombone, some sheet music, and her insistence that everyone have a good time and swing.

She accomplishes this nicely — and she’s also one of those musicians who seems to be growing and developing before our eyes . . . not that she was a novice when I first encountered her!

For her midweek session at the Radegast Bierhalle in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Emily assembled her “Garden Party,” a hot band despite its refined UK title.  This version had our Ms. Asher on trombone / vocals; Bria Skonberg on trumpet / vocals; Dan Levinson on clarinet / tenor; Kelly Friesen on string bass; Nick Russo on banjo / guitar; Kevin Dorn on drums.  And since it was a Wednesday during the two-week Dan Barrett Celebratory East Coast Tour, Dan came uptown from his earlier gig with David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Centennial Band and brought the fiery clarinetist Pete Martinez with him.

Here are a goodly handful of video performances from that night at Radegast.  Expert dancing provided by Sam Huang and Michelle DeCastro — other dancers unidentified.

The Garden Party began with something fierce and New Orleanian — Jelly Roll Morton’s MILENBERG JOYS:

Then, the hot yet admonitory SOME OF THESE DAYS, with a Charleston beat:

Emily very sweetly offered a slow waltz-time HEY, LOOK ME OVER! — commenting that her father had taught her the song when she was three, and she retains some of the choreography from her childhood.  I find it absolutely charming.  (Thanks, Dad!):

And a perennial: ROYAL GARDEN BLUES:

I was embarrassed by my ignorance, having no idea of what this song was — but Emily told me in a kind way that it was EMPEROR NORTON’S HUNCH.  I think I have to take Remedial Turk Murphy over the summer:

NOBODY’S SWEETHEART NOW featured a harmonized vocal chorus from Emily and Bria, who remain our sweethearts:

For the last few numbers of the third set, Dan Barrett and Pete Martinez joined in (up until this point, they had been enjoying the sounds) on an energetic but not-too-fast MUSKRAT RAMBLE (beginnig a compact Louis-tribute, but all jazz is a Louis-tribute, isn’t it?):

Dan borrowed Bria’s trumpet for a nifty BIG BUTTER AND EGG MAN, and I thought, “Where else on the planet could I hear Louis’ 1926 chorus played with such accuracy and fervor?”:

And we close this visit to Emily’s wonderful party with a sweet ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET, with Bria back on trumpet and Dan on trombone, trading phrases:

Wonderful!  And if you get on Emily’s email list (visit her site at http://www.emilyasher.com.) you can find out when the next party is — as well as learning about her upcoming CD, which needs your support:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/712404112/emily-ashers-debut-cd-featuring-garden-party-and-e