Daily Archives: January 9, 2012

“SUITABLE FOR DANCING”: THE ELLIS ISLAND BOYS (and GIRL) PLAY “I’M COMIN’ VIRGINIA” (for BIX and EDDIE LANG)

This wonderful impromptu video was created by Alex Matthews — his YouTube channel is called “talentedlosers,” make of that what you will.  He took his video camera to California Adventure Disney (in Anaheim) where the “Ellis Island Boys” are appearing three times a week for seven half-hour sets.

If you think of “Ellis Island Boys” as being a group of imitation immigrants, think again: how about Ralf Reynolds (washboard); John Reynolds (guitar and vocal); Katie Cavera (string bass); Bryan Shaw (sitting in for Marc Caparone, trumpet) — we know them as the Reynolds Brothers! — performing a truly Bixian version of I’M COMIN’ VIRGINIA that also pays homage to Eddie Lang:

Thanks to Ralf, John, Bryan, Katie, Alex, the ghost of Walt, Bix, and Eddie . . . for the lovely music and the lovely video!

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SOUTHERN (CALIFORNIA) COMFORT: THE “ELLIS ISLAND BOYS (and GIRL)” at CALIFORNIA ADVENTURE DISNEY

It’s not too soon to make plans for hot jazz for the next two months.  For the first time in its existence, JAZZ LIVES can recommend a trip to California Adventure Disney in Anaheim — the Paradise Garden Bandstand, to be precise, where this band is playing seven half-hour sets (beginning at 11:50 AM and ending at 7 PM) three days a week:

Do they look familiar in this action shot taken by our friend Susan Miyata?  Yes — you guessed right — the “Ellis Island” crew is our Peerless Quartet, known to the authorities as the Reynolds Brothers, and sometimes as the Reynolds Brothers Rhythm Rascals.  From the left, that’s Marc Caparone, trumpet and vocals; Ralf Reynolds, washboard, vocals; Katie Cavera, string bass, banjo, guitar, vocals; John Reynolds, guitar, banjo, whistling, vocals.  We knew that the Ellis Island Boys had arrived when we saw they had their own Facebook page: Ellis-Island-Boys

For the remainder of January, they will be appearing on the 10, 14, 15, 19, 21, 22, 24, 27, and 30.  In February, they will be swinging out on the 3, 5, 8, 11, 12, 14, 17, 22, 24, 25, 26, 28.

Founder Walt had a real love for hot jazz and it looks as if the tradition is being carried on in the best way.  I want the great Disney marketing machinery to kick in — souvenir washboards would be the first step . . .

And here’s another photo — by Alex Matthews — that shows Bryan Shaw sitting in for Marc Caparone . . . same hot music and high-level entertainment!

“EAST ST. LOUIS TOODLE-OO”: KEITH NICHOLS’ BLUE DEVILS PLAY DUKE ELLINGTON at the 2011 WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (thanks to Flemming Thorbye)

November 5, 2011, Saturday night at the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party was a highlight — the crowd cheered, with good reason!

With Mr. Nichols at the piano and occasionally exercising his vocal cords, the band included Rico Tomasso, Andy Woon, and Bent Persson, trumpets; Alistair Allan, trombone; Matthias Seuffert, Jean-Francois Bonnel, Mauro Porro, reeds; Martin Wheatley, banjo and guitar; Richard Pite, string bass; Nick Ward, drums; Cecile McLorin Salvant, vocals.

THE MOOCHE (featuring the Jungle Band sound and the earthy percussion of Nick Ward, as well as a beautiful alto excursion by M. Bonnel before Rico masterfully growls us to the finish line):

CREOLE LOVE CALL (beginning with Cecile’s wordless vocal — a la Baby Cox or Adelaide Hall, then the mournful sound of Alistair Allan, the dangerously-muted Rico and the multi-talented Mauro on clarinet.  Hear that reed section!):

Then something riotous, borrowing some of its impetus from — you guessed it, OLD MAN RIVER — the 1930 showpiece OLD MAN BLUES, which is a famous film highlight from the Amos ‘n’ Andy film CHECK AND DOUBLE CHECK: Alistair Allen becomes Tricky Sam; Mauro Porro does his Harry Carney; Keith Nichols strides out; Jean-Francois Bonnel, on soprano, soars; Bent Persson roars:

The 1932 version of THE SHEIK OF ARABY, indebted far more to Bechet than Valentino, features the usual brilliant suspects — adding Andy Woon (as Cootie), Keith (as himself — with commentary by Rico), and Mauro (as Hodges on soprano) to the solo order:

TRUCKIN’ brings Mr. Nichols back in the vocal spotlight, and there’s a solo spot for Matthias Seuffert on clarinet — with a multi-media opportunity for audience participation later on. (Bridget Calzaretta and Paul Asaro are truckin’ on down on the tiny dance floor.):

IT DON’T MEAN A THING (IF IT AIN’T GOT THAT SWING) begins with the verse by Keith, then Cecile McLorin Salvant joins in to reiterate the philosophy — best embodied by that searing trumpet section:

An encore, COTTON CLUB STOMP, showed off that this band still had lots of energy. (That’s Jonathan David Holmes in dark shirt and glasses, near the stage on the right):

The Maestro would have been pleased.  See these videos and many more at http://www.thorbye.net.