Daily Archives: January 18, 2012

JAZZ PARADE AT PISMO (October 2011) with the AU BROTHERS JAZZ BAND and GUESTS

The family that plays together . . . creates beautiful music.  Here are some more performances by the Au Brothers Jazz Band from their October 28, 2011, appearance at the Pismo Beach “Jazz Jubilee by the Sea”: for this occasion, the band was Gordon Au, trumpet; Justin Au, trumpet; Brandon Au, trombone / English baritone; Howard Miyata, tuba.  (That’s “Uncle How” to those in the know.)  The friends were Katie Cavera, banjo / guitar; Danny Coots, drums — with a few added surprises.

Let’s start with Gordon’s own PISMO BEACH PARADE — a rollicking march which keeps its flavor no matter if it’s performed far from Pismo — say in Brooklyn, New York:

The Brothers welcomed the hot pianist Jeff Barnhart for a little meteorology in PENNIES FROM HEAVEN — sweetly expounded by Uncle How:

I WOULD DO MOST ANYTHING FOR YOU was an occasion to welcome other playful folks to the stand: Bob Draga and Peter Meijers, clarinet; Jeff Beaumont, alto sax — a reed section to match the Au /  Miyata brass:

Two satires follow — a slightly modified version of ROCKIN’ CHAIR (“Fetch me that ginseng,” is what I believe we hear):

and I’M GONNA SIT RIGHT DOWN AND WRITE MYSELF A LETTER, its Thirties lyrics updated and reconfigured:

Here’s a groovy SHE’S CRYING FOR ME — with an unidentified young washboardist, stage right, in dialogue with Gordon:

In memory of the Eddie Condon Town Hall concerts, a key-changing OLE MISS:

Although this is a thoroughly mischievous band, they play KEEPIN’ OUT OF MISCHIEF NOW (beginning with the tender verse). And, as for the vocal, it’s Crosby, Columbo, and Miyata:

Let’s conclude with a mellow Fiesta for Brass on the theme of STARDUST:

I doubt that I will ever organize a jazz festival in this life — but this band seems supremely good music and good value.  Is anyone listening?

All these nice videos were created by Gene Mondro: thanks and applause to Gene!  The comings and goings of the Au Brothers are ly documented here on “Dolphinhunter,” their YouTube channel.

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IF SOMETHING’S WRONG, THIS WILL FIX IT. GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK!

Do you have food allergies?  Night terrors?  Has your psychic armor been attacked by moths?

Do you suffer from timor mortis, tempus fugit, or do you feel like terra incognito?

A cure is within your reach– locally sourced, grain-fed, definitely not approved by the FDA, organic, and swinging.

Doctors Ralf and John Reynolds, Katie Cavera, and Marc Caparone are in their office, waiting to take your call:

The Ellis Island Boys (and an E.I.Girl) performing THE SCAT SONG at California Adventure Disney on January 15, 2011 — recorded by recusatio

Take as often as needed!

“LOVER, COME BACK TO ME”: HENRY “RED” ALLEN, CLARK TERRY, RUBY BRAFF: Newport Jazz Festival Trumpet Workshop (July 1966)

Another treasure from Franz Hoffmann — featuring these three great idiosyncratic weavers of sound in fascinating solos and ensembles that suggest ballroom dancers expertly maneuvering on a crowded floor.  We don’t even mind that the silent images of Braff and Terry are reversed: it’s a boon to hear this performance again.  In the early Seventies, it was reshown on WNET as a filler: I tape-recorded the soundtrack (which has of course vanished) but it was too early for home video recording.

Festival performances that mix players of “different”styles sometimes are less than the players arranged on stage: this one shows us how these three great players were rooted in swing and melody — and how they knew about leaving space for the other players.  I would make this required listening for those youths (no matter how old they are) who naively presume that all jazz before Coltrane was simplistic, everyone following meekly in the same narrow paths.

LENA BLOCH, VLADIMIR SHAFRANOV, PUTTER SMITH, MARK FERBER — in NEW YORK!

I don’t know when and where I first encountered the superb saxophonist Lena Bloch: perhaps she sat in at one of the Michael Kanan – Ted Brown – Joel Press gigs at Sofia’s?  and I recall her joining Brad Linde on the stand — happily!  However, she impressed me there as someone with a gentle lyricism and a pulsing inventiveness.  And Lena surrounds herself with equally surprising players who aren’t as well known as their music would deserve.  So I humbly suggest you take note of Lena’s two gigs at the end of this month and the start of the next.  You’ll go out into the winter night feeling warmed by the music she and her friends create.

Lena’s not the only reason to don your scarf (if this unpredictable weather requires it): another is pianist Vladimir Shafranov, who lived and worked in New York City more than a decade ago — with associations with George Coleman, Clifford Jordan, Dizzy Gillespie, Al Foster, George Mraz, Cecil McBee, Idris Muhammad, and many others.  The January 2012 HOT HOUSE describes him as “sinfully underrated.”

Here are two examples of Vladimir, improvising on familiar material: Watch him dance through HOW ABOUT YOU?

and a lyrical but harmonically deep WARM VALLEY:

Lena, Vladimir, and the fine bassist Putter Smith will be performing at Smalls Jazz Club on Monday, January 30, Monday, at 7 pm.  And on Thursday, February 2, they will be at the Kitano Hotel (joined by drummer Mark Ferber) at 8 and 10 PM.  Smalls has a music charge of $20 — for which one can stay all night, and the Kitano requires a $15 minimum spent on beverages or food.  Reservations are strongly suggested at the Kitano, so call 212 885 7119 ti assure yourself a space.

And if the name Lena Bloch is new to you, you might want to listen to this, where she and pianist Evgeny Svitsov make winding paths through EVERYTHING HAPPENS TO ME (recorded in May 2011):

She’s a special player, and she attracts others who think and feel deeply.

GRATITUDE IN 4/4 (Part Three): GRAND DOMINION JAZZ BAND at the 2011 SAN DIEGO THANKSGIVING DIXIELAND JAZZ FESTIVAL (thanks to Rae Ann Berry)

More wonderful music from the 2011 San Diego Thanksgiving Dixieland Festival, proving that gratitude is a year-round phenomenon.

Here are eight gratifying performances by the Grand Dominion Jazz Band, recorded on November 24-25, 2011, and made available for JAZZ LIVES through the generosity of Rae Ann Berry, whose handiwork can be seen in two places (if you don’t encounter her at a concert, gig, or jazz party): her up-to-date list of hot jazz gigs in the area on www.sfraeann.com and her YouTube channel here.

Grand Dominion is led by pianist Bob Pelland, and features our friend Clint Baker — the wonderfully fulfilling multi-instrumentalist — here on trumpet, with Jeff Hamilton on drums giving the band just the right kind of relaxed drive from his kit.  The other worthies are Mike Fay, string bass; Jim Armstrong, trombone and vocals; Gerry Green, reeds; Bill Dixon, banjo.

ALL THE GIRLS GO CRAZY ‘BOUT THE WAY I WALK had a less genteel title in its first incarnation, but this will do:

Still down in New Orleans, here’s the GRAVIER STREET BLUES, with Clint in a fine Mutt Carey mood:

ST. PHILIP STREET BREAKDOWN — recalling George Lewis — features Gerry Green and the rhythm section:

PANAMA (not “PANAMA RAG”) by William H. Tyers, gets a fine rocking treatment here, all of its strains treated respectfully and with heat:

WILD MAN BLUES reminds me of Red Allen’s 1957 version in its steady intensity — and that’s the highest compliment I can pay:

The New Orleanians — wherever they found themselves on the planet — liked to offer swinging versions of “pop tunes” for dancing, and INTO EACH LIFE SOME RAIN MUST FALL lends itself delightfully to this treatment, with fine solos after the sweet vocal:

Recalling the 1940 Decca session that paired Louis and Bechet, here’s a gutty PERDIDO STREET BLUES, with beautiful drumming from Jeff:

Asking the perennially nagging question, DO YOU EVER THINK OF ME? (and the answer is “Of course we do!):

Thanks to Paul Daspit and these glorious musicians.  More to come!

GRATITUDE IN 4/4 (Part Four): THE YERBA BUENA STOMPERS at the 2011 SAN DIEGO THANKSGIVING DIXIELAND JAZZ FESTIVAL (thanks to Rae Ann Berry)

Good for stompin’, to quote Oran Page.  Here’s some truly heartfelt hot jazz from the 2011 San Diego Thanksgiving Dixieland Jazz Festival — thanks to Paul Daspit, who brought these glorious musicians together and made sure everyone on and off the stand was beaming, and more of the same to our own “SFRaeAnn,” Rae Ann Berry, whose devotion to the music sends it around the world in the very best ways: her up-to-date list of hot jazz gigs in the area on www.sfraeann.com and her YouTube channel here.

The Yerba Buena Stompers, led by banjoist / singer John Gill, improve the air whenever they play.  In this incarnation, recorded on November 24 and 25, 2011, in two sets, the YBS took its repertoire in part from the songs that Alan Adams — the late trombonist and San Diego festival director — loved to play.  Alan had good taste, and this is the way to be remembered!

In addition to Mister Gill, the band sported Kevin Dorn, drums; Conal Fowkes, piano; Clint Baker, tuba; Tom Bartlett, trombone; Orange Kellin, clarinet, and the brass superheroes Leon Oakley and Duke Heitger on cornet and trumpet, respectively.

Here’s MUSK(R)AT RAMBLE, played at the nice tempo it began its life at:

And that rocking lament, SOMEBODY STOLE MY GAL, explicated by Duke:

Another GAL, who stayed where she was, was Paul Dresser’s loyal MY GAL SAL:

A brisk exploration of WABASH BLUES:

One of the great early hit songs of the last century, ROSES OF PICARDY (again taken at such a sweet tempo — balancing Hot and Sentimental perfectly). The trumpet conversation after Orange’s solo is priceless:

Something for Johnny Dodds — circa 1926, Chicago — FLAT FOOT:

A less-known invitation to the dance from the Hot Five repertoire, with an inviting vocal by John — and dig the trumpet / cornet sound on the verse, and their colloquy after the vocal:

Finally, an evocation of Louis and Papa Joe, RIVERSIDE BLUES:

Come on and Stomp!