Daily Archives: April 24, 2012

TAKE ME TO THE LANDS OF JAZZ — 1948 and 1949

These postcards (being sold on eBay) have a certain poignancy for me — not only because I can’t get to these occasions by any means short of the paranormal — but because when I go down to Greenwich Village in New York to hear jazz at Smalls, for instance, I could walk to these fabled sites.

Read the postcard, close your eyes, and imagine the band!

I can hear Benny Morton and that rhythm section . . . and I’ll bet there were some serious blues played that night.  Worth $1.25.

Three of the finest cornetists / trumpeters one could imagine — with Gowans and Marsala, James P., and that Bechet fellow.  Have mercy.

Well, it is reassuring to know — even at this distance — that such things happened — not once but often.

May your happiness increase.

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I’LL PAY THE TOLLS AND FIND PARKING. WHO WANTS TO JOIN ME?

From the national attic and time machine known as eBay . . .

Thank you, Jack Crystal, for making such things possible.  That I wasn’t even born yet is only a slight impediment to the imagination.

May your happiness increase.

“FAMILY-FRIENDLY”: THE REYNOLDS BROTHERS, FAMILY, AND FRIENDS at DIXIELAND MONTEREY (March 3, 2012)

“Family-friendly” often means that there will be a Children’s Menu, mac and cheese, crayons, and a paper tablecloth . . . or that the master of ceremonies will avoid anatomical jokes in favor of balloon animals.

But when it comes to hot jazz, the Reynolds Brothers are always family-friendly, since Ralf (washboard and commentary) and John (vocals, guitar, banjo, whistling, and commentary) are brothers.  Apparently they are friendly as well!  Katie Cavera (string bass, vocals) and Marc Caparone (cornet, vocals) are related only in their love of deep swing and an awareness of absurdities.

But this session — recorded on March 3, 2012, at the Dixieland Monterey Jazz Bash by the Bay — was seriously family-friendly in the most elevating way because Dave Caparone — Marc’s father — a superb swing trombonist, came along for the ride.  Dave never studied Benny Morton, but he has a good deal of the Master’s warm, burry sound in solo and his neat, unhackneyed ensemble playing.

The cosmic syncopations the Brothers and family created acted as jazz pheronomes, so other players joined in, as you will see.

Swing, you cats!

LADY BE GOOD:

SOME OF THESE DAYS:

Allan Vache brought himself and his clarinet for LOVE IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER:

Mark Allen Jones couldn’t wait to hear Katie’s Second Avenue turn on BEI MIR BIS DU SCHOEN:

I GOT RHYTHM:

WRAP YOUR TROUBLES IN DREAMS:

MY HONEY’S LOVIN’ ARMS:

HAPPY FEET:

May your happiness increase.

Incidentally, I have it on good authority that Ralf is going to be forming a Southern California chapter of the Anti-Defamation League exclusively for the aid and comfort of washboard players.  I’ve asked to be an honorary member, and remind the anti-washboardians that any instrument can swing when played with expertise and feeling.  And yes, I would be happy if my sister married a washboard player — if he swung like Ralf.  But she’s taken, so it might be a moot point.

FRESH AND JUICY: THE BERRY PICKERS PLAY BIX, TRAM, ROLLINI, and FRIENDS

Often, bands striving for “authenticity” when playing Twenties jazz take their OKehs and Gennetts too seriously, the result a certain dogged heaviness.  Cornetist / arranger Jérôme Etcheberry knows better, and his bands float rather than slog.  The newest pleasing evidence is his small group, the BERRY PICKERS, and the five videos that appeared without fanfare on YouTube.

Their repertoire is drawn from the late-Twenties efforts of Bix Beiderbecke, Frank Trumbauer, Adrian Rollini, Eddie Lang, and their friends.  But there is no imitation of solos, and the overall lightness has a sweet jauntiness that I associate with the unbuttoned efforts of Richard M. Sudhalter, John R.T. Davies, and Nevil Skrimshire.

Hear for yourself!

Jérôme Etcheberry’s BERRY PICKERS are Nicolas Dary (alto sax) Jérôme Etcheberry (cornet) Fred Couderc (bass sax) Hugo Lippi (guitar) Stephane Seva (drums).

The DeSylva-Brown-Henderson hymn to caffeine, YOU’RE THE CREAM IN MY COFFEE:

Coffee leads to dancing, so Milton Ager’s HAPPY FEET:

And, yes, let’s do THE BALTIMORE (Dan Healy, Irving Kahal, Jimmy McHugh):

Where does Chauncey Morehouse’s THREE BLIND MICE fit in?  Under the heading of “futuristic rhythm,” no doubt:

And, to close, Fats Waller’s I’M MORE THAN SATISFIED:

My feelings exactly.

May your happiness increase.