Daily Archives: July 18, 2012

ON THE DOWN BEAT: MILDRED, LOUIS, BENNY, and SID

Thanks to David Weiner, I have spent some time enjoying the cover portraits (some of them became iconic) from this site that specializes in older magazines and comic books.  For sale, of course.   Connoisseurs of antiquarian pulchritude may enjoy the display of black-and-white cleavage, but here are four portraits that caught my attention.

Mildred Bailey and dachshunds, one harmonizing, perhaps during a Petrillo recording ban.  Were they rehearsing SING FOR YOUR SUPPER?:

Ralph Marterie and another trumpet player:

Benny Goodman and Martha Tilton . . . you explain this one to me, please:

And finally, Bill and Ruth Reinhardt of Chicago’s JAZZ LTD., and a somewhat frail-looking Sidney Catlett, after his heart attack:

Buy ’em, trade ’em, get the set here.

May your happiness increase.

DON’T MISS THIS! ROSSANO, HAL, NICKI, STEPHANIE (July 28, 2012)

Late July lends itself to a kind of peaceful slowing-down.  You can happily sit in a canvas chair, facing the garden, and watch the zucchini grow more monstrous by the hour.  You could watch the little birds skitter across the sand at your favorite beach.  You can make ratatouille.

All these pleasures are divine (although the zucchini can terrify) but they can be visited at your leisure.  I want to remind JAZZ LIVES readers who live in the Bay Area that a midsummer pleasure is coming to San Rafael on July 28 — like an eclipse, it will be here for a short time and once it’s gone . . .

Four extraordinary musicians will be having their own little jazz party.  You’re invited!

Rossano Sportiello (piano) and Nicki Parrott (string bass, vocals) will swing out with Hal Smith (drums) and Stephanie Trick (piano) in concert on Saturday, July 28, beginning at 5 PM at Dominican College in San Rafael — that’s in Angelico Hall, and the street address is 50 Acacia Avenue. Tickets are $30 apiece, and can be purchased here. Or you can call 1-800-838-3006, extension 1.  Don’t wait!  All proceeds from this concert will go to the Dominican College’s piano fund . . . they’ve bought a nine-foot Bosendoerfer, which is always a great thing.

So back away from that grill.  Put down that mojito. Only for a moment, mind you.  We hope to see you there!

Or, for the visual learners in the house, here’s your choice.

Armful of zucchini?

Or Handful of Keys?

May your happiness increase.

DEAN MARTIN IN THE LAND OF JAZZ?

In May 2012, I visited the National Underground on East Houston Street in New York City to hear John Gill’s National Saloon Band play a few glorious sets, with music ranging from Chicago jazz of the Twenties to Bing Crosby in the Thirties to Jimmie Rodgers . . . see the expansive range of John and the band here and here.

The management of the National Underground might not have had the most solid understanding of what John’s audience would have understood as appropriate background music — but they did the best they could for “older Americana”: a Dean Martin compilation CD.

I always thought Martin was vastly underrated as a swinging singer, and recall with pleasure the words of the late John S. Wilson, jazz critic for the New York Times (he had a seminal radio program on WQXR-FM, which began with Ellington’s ACROSS THE TRACK BLUES — evidence of Wilson’s deep good taste):  he wrote that Martin deserved to record with the best jazz background then possible — a small band featuring Joe Thomas, trumpet; Vic Dickenson, trombone; Ben Webster, tenor.  (I think that band could have made Raymond Massey swing, but no matter.)  It never happened, and I didn’t have any sense that Dean Martin had actually recorded with a swinging background.

The compilation CD went through the familiar Martin recordings and then arrived at one new to me, a song that borrows elements from a half-dozen songs, not the least of them being I’M GONNA SIT RIGHT DOWN AND WRITE MYSELF A LETTER.  This lyrical conceit is more vindictive than lonesome, addressed to a presumably unfaithful or duplicitous lover, I’M GOING TO PAPER MY WALLS WITH YOUR LOVE LETTERS.  But listen closely to the band:

The opening ensemble reminds me of the Rampart Street Paraders — neatly “arranged Dixie,” in the manner of Matty Matlock or Billy May, with the string bass playing in two, a descending “Dixieland” figure scored for the horns, then a clarinet obbligto making its way in as the chorus continues — it could be Matlock or two dozen other players to my ears.  After Martin finishes his first chorus, things get looser and more heated.  Is that Dick Cathcart on trumpet?  Clyde Hurley?  And the trombonist, expertly maneuvering around in the middle and low section of the ensemble, could be Moe Schneider — lacking the violent swashbuckling of Abe Lincoln.

But wait!  There’s more!

At 1:27,more or less, the veil of polite behavior lifted, the businessman’s-Dixie got put aside, and the Masters came out to play.  To my ears, the drummer is Nick Fatool, the trombonist Lou McGarity (based on the shouting entrance into the solo).  This deliverance lasts less than thirty seconds, but it’s a wonderful surprise.  (And — so reminiscent of the 1928-31 “hot dance”records that had a peppy orchestral rendition of a danceable melody, then a winning but restrained vocal chorus — with a fiery eight or sixteen bars of jazz improvisation in the last chorus . . . if the prospective buyer had gotten that far, the sale was complete and Mother or Father were not going to scared off by some unbridled devil’s music.)

The closing chorus is slightly more emphatic than the first, but it’s fairly clear that the players have gone back to the manuscript paper: the whole recording, presumably from the middle Fifties, has a sweetly nostalgic air, harking back to Bing Crosby and the John Scott Trotter small groups.

I confess that what has appeared above has very little solid evidence to support it.  I could find no hard evidence of personnel, recording date, and location: the only evidence I have is that the song was recorded by The Ravens and the Andrews Sisters . . . my guess is that this order is right.  If anyone knows more than I have offered here, please chime in.  Until then, I invite you to savor Martin, the band, and that brief hot interlude in the middle.  Eckhart Tolle tells us that it is not our true work to name the beautiful bird or plant that we encounter in our travels, but to enjoy it . . . so if it turns out to be  someone entirely unknown to me on drums, on trombone, I will be surprised but I will live through it.

And this post is for the fine trumpeter and subtle singer Andrew Storar, who told me two days ago that Dean Martin was his favorite.

May your happiness increase.

NEW FACES, NEW BABY: THE SCANDINAVIAN RHYTHM BOYS TAKE TO THE WATER

The little band known as the Scandinavian Rhythm Boys has long been one of my favorite hot ensembles.  They have a new front line, with trumpeter Leif Blunck and Hans Jorgen Hansen on bass sax, clarinet and soprano.  Michael Boeving remains on banjo and expressive vocals and Ole Olsen on the string bass.  The video was recorded July 12 on a Copenhagen harbor cruise (as part of the 2012 Copenhagen Jazz Festival) by an Italian fan, Alessandro, whom we all thank!  For more about the SRB, visit here.

And the New Baby remains the same, joyously:

May your happiness increase.