Daily Archives: January 26, 2013

THE SEQUEL TO “LOST. AND FOUND?”

In case you haven’t followed this short story, here is the first installment.  A week has passed (minus a few hours) and no sign of the Red Knapsack.  It hasn’t called or sent a card, and I am assuming that it was destroyed or its contents have gone into other hands.

But those expecting a tirade on human wickedness will be disappointed.

In the post I wrote after my loss, I asked for people to send out positive energy. And wonderful things happened: some fifty people, in comments and emails, sent the most heartening expressions of love, enthusiasm, and compassion. Immediately after posting, I began to get verbal hugs from people (as far away as Australia) I’d never heard from before.  Love in all shapes and sizes came to me.

It would have been very easy to write an angry / mournful one-week-later post about how bad I feel.  And the loss makes me very unhappy.  (I have been good about putting the Second Arrow in the closet where no one can get hurt.  I’d give myself an A-.)

But I have received so much love, empathy, and good feeling that I am delighted by it.

I am in the process of replacing the equipment, which is costly.  But that act — of purchasing THINGS — is easier than finding people who love you and what you do.  I send love back to each of you, and gratitude larger than WordPress could contain.

Love in itself can’t shoot a video or upload it to YouTube.  But without that love, there would be no reason to have a camera or get on a plane to hear some music.

And the phone still might ring, even though the young-but-world-weary policeman who came to my apartment looked politely at me as if he thought I had lost track of my senses when I expressed hope.  But one never knows, do one?

And while I’m at it — although some of you might find my optimism excessive, which is your choice — I will celebrate a few other things.

In about a month, this blog will be five years old.  I won’t post about it with a picture of a cupcake, but you can tell how happy JAZZ LIVES makes me, and the joy I get from sharing beauty with you all.

A week later, I get to cheerily say, “I’ve been alive for another three years after falling down in 2010!”

And a few months later, I can look at the Beloved and say, “You know, six years ago we had lunch for the first time at a little Japanese restaurant that no longer exists?”

All good things.  Better to smile, inside and outside, than to weep and gnash.

May your happiness increase.

“MISS LIL”: LILLIAN HARDIN, HOT COMPOSER / PIANIST: BENT PERSSON, MATTHIAS SEUFFERT, STEPHANE GILLOT, JENS LINDGREN, MARTIN SECK, MARTIN WHEATLEY, MALCOLM SKED at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (October 27, 2012)

The splendors of the 2012 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party continue in a set celebrating the compositions and recordings of Miss Lil — Lillian Hardin — in the Twenties.  On the marriage license she was L. H. Armstrong, but she did more than keep house: she wrote songs and led hot recording sessions.  And she was one of the few early women to do these things successfully.  In addition, without Miss Lil, husband Louis might have stayed comfortably as Joe Oliver’s second cornetist for many years . . . material for an alternate-universe science fiction novel.

Lil’s recording career continued on through the Thirties — with a brilliant series of Decca sessions, a few featuring Joe Thomas and Chu Berry — and the Forties.  As a child, one of my first jazz records ever was a 12″ Black and White 78 of “Lil ‘Brown Gal’ Armstrong” with Jonah Jones, J. C. Higginbotham, Al Gibson, and Baby Dodds — among others.  She played and recorded with Sidney Bechet and Chicagoans . . . always exuberant, energetic.

Early on, I remember being swept up in the force and joy of Louis’ Hot Fives and Sevens, and only later coming to the sessions that paired Lil with Johnny Dodds, George Mitchell, and others — powerful music where the players’ delight was absolutely tangible.  As it is here!

Here are a half-dozen 2012 performances featuring Matthias Seuffert, clarinet; Bent Persson, cornet; Staphane Gillot, reeds; Jens Lindgren, trombone; Martin Seck, piano; Martin Wheatley, banjo; Malcolm Sked, bass.

GATEMOUTH (or GATE MOUTH, one of those locutions designed to state that one had a large orifice up front):

PERDIDO STREET BLUES:

MY BABY:

GEORGIA BO BO (from “Lil’s Hot Shots,” the Hot Five on another label, not well-disgused:

DROP THAT SACK (as above):

TOO TIGHT:

May your happiness increase.