Daily Archives: April 22, 2013

A SWINGING WEEKEND IN THE COUNTRY: JAZZ AT CHAUTAUQUA 2013 (September 19-22, 2013)

It’s coming.

Although it’s only the end of April, I am excited when I think about Jazz at Chautauqua, once again, which is a highlight of the musical year.  I’ve been attending these splendid parties since 2004, and have made new friends, heard excellent music, and generally had my spirits lifted.

This year, the 16th Jazz at Chautauqua will take place from September 19 to the 22nd.  For more information, click here.  For those who have never attended one of these weekends, it is marked by pleasures unique to that spot and that establishment.

It’s held in a beautiful 1881 wooden hotel, the Athaeneum, efficiently run by Bruce Stanton and a very genial staff — the very opposite of an anonymous chain hotel.  Walking around the grounds (when you’re not observing the beauties of Lake Chautauqua — which might include Scott and Sharon Robinson, canoeing) you see immaculately kept houses and cottages, mounds of hydrangeas . . . picture-postcard territory.  Inside, the guests enjoy substantial meals and an open bar . . . and music to dream about, starting on Thursday night with informal jamming in a cozy room, then moving to the parlor for Friday afternoon piano and guitar recitals, then a full weekend of jazz, hot and sweet, in a large ballroom — with all the amenities a ten-second walk away.

The best musicians, too.  The 2013 players and singers are (in neat alphabetical order for a change) Howard Alden, Harry Allen, Dan Barrett, Dan Block, Jon Burr, James Dapogny, the Faux Frenchmen, Mike Greensill, Marty Grosz, Bob Havens, Duke Heitger, Keith Ingham, Jon-Erik Kellso, Becky Kilgore, Dan Levinson, Kerry Lewis, Ricky Malichi, Randy Reinhart, Scott Robinson, Andy Schumm, John Sheridan, Pete Siers, Rossano Sportiello, Andy Stein, Frank Tate, John Von Ohlen, Wesla Whitfield.  Something for everyone.  Good men and women, loyal, faithful, and true.

Nancy Griffith, the Swing Sheriff, makes sure that the jazz train runs on time, that everyone is happy in Dodge, that the little dogies are swinging.

If Jazz at Chautauqua is new to you, I propose that you type those magic words into the “Search” box of JAZZ LIVES — and you will see beautifully relaxed performances from the most recent five years . . . then you can go here and look into the details of tickets and prices and all that intriguing (but necessary) detail.

And as the video-soundtrack to such endeavors, let me offer two performances from the 2012 Jazz at Chautauqua — never seen before! — by a strolling group: Harry Allen, tenor saxophone; Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet; Frank Tate, string bass; Bill Ransom, drums:

LULU’S BACK IN TOWN:

CLOSE YOUR EYES:

May your happiness increase.

Advertisements

WHAT HAPPINESS LOOKS LIKE — LONDON, 1956

Here’s a man entirely in alignment, as the life coaches say — someone who understood his true purpose early, worked at it, and derived the deepest joy from it (while improving the universe in his travels).

A previously unknown candid shot taken in London, 1956, for sale on eBay.  Here’s the information.

LOUIS, LONDON, 1956

Even someone so happy in his work needs a life partner, and this man found the one he loved in 1942:

LOUIS AND LUCILLE 1956

Click here for the eBay information.  May everyone reading this post be as happy in their lives as the man and woman in these photographs!

Thanks to David J. Weiner for pointing me to these portraits.  “Solid, Pops!”

May your happiness increase.

THE FORECAST: CLOUDY AND HOT (April 26, 2013)

BRAIN CLOUD ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

The BRAIN CLOUD is coming to Brooklyn, New York — to celebrate the release of their second CD.  What could be nicer?

In case this ebullient band of joymakers is new to you, a word in your ear: they seamlessly shift from Western Swing to Thirties jam session to original compositions that have authenticity, spring, and eloquence.  The basic BRAIN CLOUD is Dennis Lichtman, clarinet, electric mandolin, and fiddle; Tamar Korn, vocals; Kevin Dorn, drums, Raphael McGregor, lap steel guitar; Skip Krevens, guitar; Andrew Hall, string bass.  (On the CD, OUTSIDE LOOKING IN, they are joined by three guests: Noam Pikelny, banjo; Matt Munisteri, guitar; Aaron Lewis, fiddle.

The new CD’s eleven tracks so neatly embody the band’s cheerful repertoire: the ancient chestnuts, still relevant, WHEN YO WORE A TULIP, I AIN’T  GOT NOBODY, and WHEN MY DREAMBOAT COMES HOME; the fairly obscure WHAT’S THE USE OF LIVING WITHOUT LOVE? (courtesy of King Oliver’s Victor recording); “American roots music” GOTTA LOT OF RHYTHM IN MY SOUL, MISS THE MISSISSIPPI AND YOU, I’M GONNA SLEEP WITH ONE EYE OPEN, and the wholly idiomatic originals OUTSIDE LOOKING IN (with very clever lyrics), TRIGGER BLUES, WE ARE NOW!, and IN THE  BEGINNING.

A personal note.  I grew up with the stereotypical notion that much “country music” was formulaic — my woman, my truck, my hound — emotionally, rhythmically, and harmonically limited.  But the BRAIN CLOUD has introduced me to repertoire I would have never heard before, far from the synthetic music I came to deplore.  This band is a romping hot organization, its enthusiasm balanced by great precision and skill.

Here’s the post I wrote — with videos a-plenty — in celebration of their March 2011 concert at Jalopy.  It will get you moving, I guarantee.

Here’s the information for their April 26 extravaganza at the Jalopy Theatre (315 Columbia Street, Brooklyn).

You can pre-order OUTSIDE LOOKING IN as a CD, download, or vinyl record (why not get all three and be safe?) at braincloud.  Better yet, come to Jalopy, hear the band, share the exuberance, and buy the disc(s) there . . . gladdening the hearts of the musicians in the most direct way.  I’ll be there.

The cover of their new CD amuses me so — artwork and design by Nicole Schulman — that here it is again, in a slightly different format:

THE BRAIN CLOUD

May your happiness increase.