Monthly Archives: April 2013

SONG LIKE GENTLE RAIN: DIANE LINSCOTT and LARRY KOONSE

dianelinscott

I had not heard or heard of the beautifully emotive singer Diane Linscott until recently.  My loss!  From the first warm notes of her CD, YOU ARE THERE, it’s evident that she inhabits her songs, not in any artificial way, but with the words and music coming from her heart’s core.

I don’t mean that she “acts” or “emotes,” but each phrase, lyrical or musical, is lit with deep feeling and deep understanding.

It doesn’t surprise me that her comments on her CD begin with lines from Cavafy.

Nor does it surprise me her work has been applauded by musicians — among them Dick Hyman and Dan Barrett.

You can hear for yourself here.

Diane is a mature artist — and I don’t mean that in terms of chronological numbers.  But for her these songs are texts of experience, of loss and elation, of romance attained and romance elusive.  No bitter wryness for her, no ironic distance from her choices.  And we could expect no less from an artist who drove across the United States to work and record with her sole accompanist on this CD, the quietly majestic guitarist Larry Koonse.

They intertwine and dance with great melodic honesty and gentleness on NOBODY’S HEART / MY IDEAL / THE GENTLE RAIN / ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE / I’M ALWAYS CHASING RAINBOWS / YOU ARE THERE / LIKE A LOVER / THE LIES OF HANDSOME MEN / I CAN DREAM, CAN’T I? / TOUCH ME IN THE MORNING – SOFTLY, AS I LEAVE YOU / WHERE DO YOU START? / WHERE IS LOVE? / YESTERDAY I HEARD THE RAIN.  Beautifully recorded, too.

YOU ARE THERE is a rare musical experience — a series of thoughtful, heartfelt performances assembled into a CD that feels deeply authentic all the way through.  To learn more about Diane — artist / photographer as well as singer, visit here or her Facebook page.

May your happiness increase.

“THAT OLD FEELING”: TIM LAUGHLIN, CONNIE JONES, MIKE PITTSLEY, HAL SMITH, CHRIS DAWSON, MARTY EGGERS, KATIE CAVERA at SAN DIEGO (Nov. 23, 2012)

Here is my penultimate offering by the Tim Laughlin All Stars featuring Connie Jones from the 2012 San Diego Jazz Fest.  That’s Tim on clarinet; Connie on cornet and vocal; Mike Pittsley, trombone; Chris Dawson, piano; Katie Cavera, guitar; Marty Eggers, string bass; Hal Smith, drums.

I rejoice that there are still more video performances by this wonderful band — let’s call it by its true name, an orchestra — although I wish the supply had no end.  They’re lucky to us (whatever the score is or was)!

YOU’RE LUCKY TO ME:

THAT OLD FEELING (with the warm sweet melody by Tim):

ONCE IN A WHILE (the Hot Five classic, though at a nice easy bounce):

Something pretty by Tim, CRESCENT CITY MOON:

Give that peerless rhythm section something healthy — how about CHERRY:

SUGAR:

THE ONE I LOVE:

AFTER I SAY I’M SORRY:

What delicious lyricism — that old feeling, indeed.

May your happiness increase.

FREE-WHEELING ON SPRING STREET: THE EarRegulars (JON-ERIK KELLSO, MATT MUNISTERI, GREG COHEN, TAD SHULL) PLAY HOAGY CARMICHAEL (March 31, 2013)

Those “old chestnuts” can be very tasty.

RIVERBOAT SHUFFLE (originally called FREE WHEELING) by one Hoagland Carmichael, is ninety years old as I write this.  But the tune — with its twists and turns — is flavorful and lively, especially when played by a group as energized and intuitive as The EarRegulars, the regularly brilliant quartet-plus co-led by guitarist Matt Munisteri and trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso on Sunday nights (8-11 PM) at The Ear Inn, 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City.  The other members of this quartet — on March 31, 2013 — were string bassist Greg Cohen and tenor saxophonist Tad Shull.

Creativity — from 1923 or 2013 or a blending of the two — will never grow old.

May your happiness increase.

CAFE ROUGE: SVETLANA SHMULYIAN and the DELANCEY FIVE at THE BACK ROOM SPEAKEASY (April 1, 2013)

Most Monday nights, you can find the engaging young singer Svetlana Shmulyian and her Delancey Five at the Back Room Speakeasy (yes, you have to know the password to get in and the drinks are served in coffee cups) on 102 Norfolk Street on the Lower East Side of New York City.  Here’s the Back Room’s Facebook page.  Here’s Svetlana’s page, and the Delancey Five page.

On Monday, April 1, Svetlana was joined by her eminent friends Dalton Ridenhour, piano; Adrian Cunningham, reeds; Rob Garcia, drums; Brandi Disterheft, string bass; guest Tom Dempsey, guitar.  The music that resulted was impromptu, energized, and heartfelt.

You know that being in the red means financial distress; seeing red indicates rage.  Neither of those two phrases applies here, for Svetlana and friends create gracious swing — for the dancers, for the listeners, for us.  Worth a visit!  (And for my suburban brethren, there’s on-street free parking after 7.)

Here’s the first set of the night.

Berlin’s THE BEST THING FOR YOU (WOULD BE ME) by Adrian and Co:

Svetlana joins in for the 1930 paean to similitude, EXACTLY LIKE YOU:

Here’s HONEYSUCKLE ROSE:

Adrian and Svetlana warble I CAN’T GIVE YOU ANYTHING BUT LOVE:

Mr. Cunningham on the tenor for JUST YOU, JUST ME:

A tender THE VERY THOUGHT OF YOU with a glorious introduction by Dalton (as if it were a blues conceived at Minton’s in 1941):

Optimistically and energetically, BLUE SKIES:

For those who would like to hear Svetlana and friends in the hush of a recording studio, nothing could be simpler: click here.  Although it is no longer cold outside, warm music never goes out of style.

May your happiness increase.

GETTING RESPECT ON THE BANDSTAND: “THE GIRLS IN THE BAND”

The music known as jazz — however you choose to define it — has cherished its reputation as free-wheeling, radical in its approach to established texts, a music for those who knew there were worlds of experience beyond the canon.  And much of that remains true.  So it is an unpleasant irony that some people associated with jazz have been less than open in their acceptance of artists who didn’t fit their narrow criteria for acceptance.  The wrong color?  Ethnicity?  Sexual preference?  Gender?

Women have been accepted on the bandstand for more than the last century — as singers.  Even then, they were treated with condescension, mockery, derision.  “Do you know the one about the chick singer who taps at your door . . . ?”   But even the most rigidly patriarchal musicians and club owners have accepted singers as necessary parts of the Show.

But women instrumentalists and improvisers have only recently begun to gain anything but a grudging acceptance — and by that I mean acceptance from their male peers.  Lovie Austin, Dolly Jones, Mary Lou Williams, Marian McPartland, Mary Osborne, Marjorie Hyams, Melba Liston, and Vi Redd come to mind as twentieth-century pioneers, facing discrimination, subtle and overt, that should have never happened.  “Can she play?” should have been the only question, but it often was never asked.  And “all-women” bands, no matter how compelling their music, were — at best — regarded as freakish, the improvising equivalent of Dr. Johnson’s lady preacher.  Sherrie Maricle and others might tell us that the situation is improving . . . but how slowly?

Given all this, I have been looking forward to the new documentary, THE GIRLS IN THE BAND, for some time. Here is the film’s website, Facebook page, and here’s the trailer:

The film will be screening for one week, starting May 10, at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center at Lincoln Center, New York City.  Tickets can be purchased here.

GITB-Harlem_5Oct10

For information on this beautiful photograph — an updating and homage to Art Kane’s portrait, fifty years earlier, click here.

I hope to see you at the screening!

May your happiness increase.

HOTTER THAN THAT! JEFF AND JOEL’S HOUSE PARTY . . . ALMOST HERE!

Just a reminder . . . because there are only a few tickets left for this April 20-21 party / extravaganza / hot jazz retreat.  I guarantee you’ll hear delightful music from fifteen of the best in ever-shifting combinations: Armstrong, Ellington, Morton, “Dixieland,” “New Orleans,” “Chicago,” “Fifty-Second Street”: you name your pleasure.  It all takes place at Joel Schiavone’s 1805 farmhouse in Guilford for 3 sessions of music, food, and fun on Saturday and Sunday, April 20-21.

Under the direction of pianist / vocalist / instigator Jeff Barnhart, the musicians include: Lew Green and Gordon Au on trumpet, Noel Kaletsky and Joe Midiri on reeds, Craig Grant and Paul Midiri on trombone and vibraphone, Jeff Barnhart and Ian Frenkel on piano, Bob Price, John Gill, and Joel Schiavone on banjo and guitar, Frank Tate and Brian Nalepka on bass and tuba, Tom Palinko, Kevin Dorn and John Gill on drums.

Tickets for all 3 sessions – Saturday at 11 AM to 4 PM including lunch, 5 PM to 10 PM with dinner and Sunday 11 AM to 4 PM with brunch are $225, and for a single session $80 with setups provided for BYOB.

For information call 203-208-1481 or click here.

And here’s some evidence, courtesy of another bunch of merrymakers at the October 2012 party, caught for posterity by CineDevine:

May your happiness increase. 

BECKY COMES EAST! (April 28 and May 1, 2013)

BeckyKilgore

I think the appearance of Ms. Rebecca Kilgore, a/k/a Becky, is cause for sustained celebration . . . so CARPE THE SWING DIEM.

Ms. K is making a flying visit to the New York / New Jersey area for what seems like two choruses, although in reality there will be two evenings of delightful music.  Since TEMPUS FUGIT (that’s the last of the Latin for today), please mark your calendars, wear comfrotable shoes, and get ready for beauty.

On Sunday, April 28, 2013, Rebecca will be appearing at Smalls, 183 W. 10th Street, New York City, with Ehud Asherie and Dan Barrett, from 7:30-9:30.

On Wednesday, May 1, 2013, she will grace Shanghai Jazz, 24 Main Street, Madison, New Jersey (973.822.2899) with Mark Shane, Dan Barrett, and Joel Forbes.

And here’s our Becky — at the Jazz Bash by the Bay in Monterey 2011 — with Dan Barrett, Carl Sonny Leyland, Eddie Erickson, Joel Forbes, and Jeff Hamilton:

May your happiness increase.

FOR THE MAID OF MARIN, THE NYMPH OF NOVATO

“Wishes are the dreams we dream when we’re awake.”

Thanks to Dawn Lambeth and John Reynolds, to B. G. DeSylva (music and lyrics) and Dame Vera Lynn.

May your happiness increase.

GO WEST (into NEW JERSEY) FOR JAZZ!

New Jersey

Even with my much-used GPS glued to the windshield, I get lost easily while driving; certain neurons must not be speaking kindly to one another.  So for several years, the thought of “driving to Brooklyn” was stressful.  But I have gotten more brave.  Now. . . to the next summit . . . conquering New Jersey!

But what is life without live jazz?

A few days ago, I had the opportunity to hear Mark Shane — Prince of Pianists — sit down at a baby grand piano and saunter through four choruses of IF I COULD BE WITH YOU.  I am going to see Mark and Catherine Russell (and Matt Munisteri, Jon-Erik Kellso, Dan Block, and some rhythmic gents) on Monday, April 15 at Symphony Space . . . but that concert, one I am looking forward to with eagerness, seemed a long way off.  Here are the details.

I had to do something!

Full of jazz-flavored courage, I made the necessary arrangements, checked in with my cardiologist, informed the authorities.  I will be driving from Long Island to the Bickford Theatre in Morristown, New Jersey, this coming Monday, April 8, to see and hear cornetist / trombonist Randy Reinhart lead a small band (small in numbers only): Mark, piano; James Chirillo, guitar; Brian Nalepka (back in the saddle again!) on string bass; Kevin Dorn, drums.

Here’s the needed information:

The Bickford Theatre/Morris Museum: On Columbia Turnpike/Road (County Road 510) at the corner of Normandy Heights Road, east of downtown Morristown. Near Interstate 287 and the Route 24 expressway. This is a 300-seat hall with generous parking on site. Wheelchair access. Weeknight concerts are one long set (8 to 9:30 PM). Tickets are generally $15 in advance, but $18 at the door. Tickets may be purchased via credit card over the phone by calling the box office at (973) 971-3706. The box office can also provide information, directions or a simple “jazz map.”

To keep up with future events, email Jazzevents@aol.com and let them know you’d like to be in the loop — for concerts featuring the Midiri Brothers, Danny Tobias, Bria Skonberg, Dennis Lichtman, Dan Levinson, Molly Ryan, Neville Dickie, Emily Asher, Bucky PIzzarelli, Frank Vignola, Vinny Raniolo, Jon-Erik Kellso, Ehud Asherie, Peter and Will Anderson, Gordon Webster, the DIVA Jazz Orchestra and more.

May your happiness increase.

FOUR FRIENDS SWING FOR US

My guess is that you might not have heard of these four fellows.  But that isn’t a terrible thing: I post this to remind people that gratifying improvised music is being created all over the world — not just by stars in concert halls and clubs in big cities.  Here’s a truly swinging version of CHEROKEE created by four fellows in Bologna, Italy, in July 2012:

Davide Brillante, guitar; Stefano Sorace, drums; Matteo Raggi, tenor saxophone;  Rob Beneventi, string bass.

They know how to pulse, how to lay it down in the most relaxed manner, how to intertwine and how to stay out of each others’ way — gentle convincing swing mastery!

I wish I could travel all over the world and meet musicians like this . . . it happens for me, but not as often as I would like.  BUT . . . Davide Brilliante will be visiting New York City this summer — so I hope some of my musician-readers find him on his Facebook page  and say, “Come on and sit in when you visit!”

May your happiness increase.

DOES YOUR ICONIC VOICE DRIP WITH LIFE EXPERIENCE?

Billie Holiday’s iconic voice dripped with life experience, and with good reason. The jazz and blues star’s 44 short years were littered with rape, child prostitution, addiction, rehab, prison – and international recognition for being one of last century’s finest singers.

That is the opening of a news story in a UK paper — reviewing another singer’s Billie Holiday tribute.  Here it is: no invention.  I will ignore the prose, though the dripping and the littering suggest that a good tidying-up is needed.

But it raises the usual question for me.  Billie Holiday is perhaps the jazz artist most victimized by posthumous “adulation” I can think of, with Beiderbecke and Parker not far behind.

I know that people are fascinated by the dead — especially those dead men and women who lived dramatically.  And I was raised, as a writer, to think that biographical detail counts, that you can’t entirely be a New Critic and pretend that Keats didn’t die young, that Joseph Cornell didn’t have mad crushes on younger women, that Beverly Kenney did not kill herself.

But when so many searches on JAZZ LIVES are for information about Billie and drugs — not Billie and music — I despair.

For all of those eager people who cannot think of Lady Day without a needle stuck in her arm . . . I would prescribe a course of steady listening to ME, MYSELF, AND I — in both takes.

Could we admire the artist’s work, its beauty, its scope, instead of wanting to make her “iconic” — which means a doomed figure we can morbidly eat and drink?

What if we knew nothing of any artist’s personal life, that he or she had lived in died in serene anonymity?  Would the art still be life-enhancing?

Where does adulation stop and voyeurism (out of whatever motives) begin?

What do we want of these dead people we say we love?

May your happiness increase. 

“LINGER AWHILE”: TIM LAUGHLIN, CONNIE JONES, CHLOE FEORANZO, MIKE PITTSLEY, HAL SMITH, KATIE CAVERA, MARTY EGGERS, CHRIS DAWSON at SAN DIEGO (Nov. 25, 2012)

Here’s that lovely band again, with a youthful guest star who fits right in.  Tim Laughlin, clarinet; Connie Jones, cornet / vocal; Mike Pittsley, trombone; Chris Dawson, piano; Katie Cavera, guitar; Marty Eggers, string bass; Hal Smith, drums, and Chloe Feoranzo, clarinet / tenor.  Recorded at the San Diego Thanksgiving Dixieland Festival, now the San Diego Jazz Fest, on November 23, 2012.

The tune list reminds me of an imagined Eden — Eddie Condon’s in the late Fifties.  A few old-fashioned singable pop hits of the Twenties, some “Chicago jazz,” Morton, Beiderbecke, Carmichael, Handy, Charles Ellsworth Russell.  A perfectly balanced diet: ask any swing nutritionist.

LINGER AWHILE:

PEE WEE’S BLUES:

WOLVERINE BLUES:

SINGIN’ THE BLUES:

THERE’LL BE SOME CHANGES MADE:

BEALE STREET BLUES (how splendidly Connie — the great storyteller — sings this!):

AVALON:

NEW ORLEANS:

I’ve written a good deal about this band — whose music thrills me every time — but I’d like to point out a few things: the way Tim and Chloe intertwine, and his beautiful low register and her energies.  Marty’s unerring pulse and big fat notes! The beautiful introductions Chris creates.  How Hal keeps everyone on track, and his wonderful sounds.  Katie’s delicious acousticism!  Mike’s intelligent, intuitive ensemble work, and conversational solos.  And Connie’s poignancy. Beautiful tempos that never seem too fast or too slow: music for dancing, for dreaming, for uplifting the heart.

LINGER AWHILE isn’t just a song title here; it’s a gracious invitation into deep mysteries of beauty, accessible to everyone but nearly impossible to reproduce.

May your happiness increase.

WHEN THE SONG (and the BAND) SAY “YES!”: STEPHANIE TRICK, CHRIS DAWSON, NATE KETNER, JOHN REYNOLDS, RALF REYNOLDS, KATIE CAVERA, BRAD ROTH at SAN DIEGO 2012

The song chosen was the cheerful assent ‘DEED I DO.  And they certainly did.  This took place at the San Diego Jazz Fest (nee the San Diego Thanksgiving Dixieland Jazz Festival) on November 25, 2012, and the participants were that festival’s edition of the Reynolds Brothers (John, guitar); Ralf (washboard); Nate Ketner (alto saxophone); Katie Cavera (string bass) . . . and guests Brad Roth (banjo) and the duo-pianists, the team of Dawson and Trick . . . Chris and Stephanie.

There is a bit of bench-swapping here, but it’s legal, innocent, and consensual.  No need to send the children from the room.  And those eye-popping visual explosions?  Not the Fourth of July or Guy Fawkes Day . . . someone’s flash camera.  But the music triumphs, as always.

May your happiness increase.

CATHERINE RUSSELL SWINGS IN (M)ANY LANGUAGE(S)!

Hearing Catherine Russell, I am always reminded of Eddie Durham’s sentence in praise of Ed Hall: “He didn’t know how not to swing!”

And when you put Catherine in front of a hot band — the evidence follows immediately! — the effect is happily seismic.

Here she is at the 22nd International Bohém Ragtime & Jazz Festival in Kecskemét, Hungary, singing EVERYBODY LOVES MY BABY (the arrangement is by Andy Farber and Attila Korb) with the Hungarian Bohém Ragtime Jazz Band . . . József Lebanov, trumpet; Attila Korb, trombone; Zoltán Mátrai, reeds; Tamás Ittzés, piano; György Mátrai, guitar; József Török, string bass; Alfréd Falusi, drums.  Recorded March 23, 2013.  More information: bohemragtime and catherinerussell.

Here Catherine ventures into Hungarian melody and lyrics.  True, she has to put on her glasses, but she does such a nice job — her singing comes from the heart!  The band is almost the same, but Tamás Ittzés switches to violin, with Miklós Lázár alongside him.  The song is “miért szerettem bele magába,” which I believe translates to WHY I FELL IN LOVE, and it’s a neat rhythm ballad.  Can’t you hear Louis or Fats doing it, around 1936?  (I am sure that one of my readers can tell us all more about this composition by Mihály Eisemann and László Szilágyi.

And some wonderful swing dancing, too.

For those who wish to sing along, the lyrics are:

Mért szerettem bele magába? Gondolkodom, de már hiába.

Bármi rosszul esik, a szív beleesik egy ilyen kis hibába.

Ki gondolta volna előre, hogy ez lesz a végén belőle?

Máris odavagyok, majdnem belehalok, mi lesz ebből jövőre?

Ez egy olyan dolog, amin muszáj zokogni,

E sok közül éppen magát kellett kifogni.

Mért szerettem bele magába? Gondolkodom, de már hiába.

Bármi rosszul esik, a szív beleesik egy ilyen kis hibába.

Catherine Russell is a star — wherever we find her!

And that reminds me.  If you don’t see yourself as going to Hungary in the next two weeks, or you have mislaid your passport, swing relief is in sight.  Catherine will be appearing with a beautifully hot band on Monday, April 15, 2013, at a concert given by the Sidney Bechet Society.

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That, as Keats said, is all you need to know.  See you there!

May your happiness increase.

JACK TEAGARDEN, ALL BY HIMSELF, CONTINUES TO ASTONISH

The deeply talented musician Jean-Francois Bonnel just called our attention to these two solo performances — Jack Teagarden, recorded backstage — improvising on LOVER (his famous solo) and the blues (looser). They are astonishing displays of what Jack always did — make the absolutely impossible look, if not easy, at least plausible.

LOVER:

THE BLUES:

The brass players in the audience will be able to tell us just how superheroic that playing is.  The rest of us will simply have to smile and marvel.  Jack’s been gone almost fifty years — but he hasn’t been equalled or replaced.

(Bless Jack for sharing his talents so open-heartedly, and bless the recordist!)

May your happiness increase.

HILARY GARDNER SINGS: “THE GREAT CITY”

The-Great-City

In a city full of stirring, individualistic jazz singers, I invite you to welcome Hilary Gardner to the great stage.

This isn’t to presume her a new discovery — hardly!  But her debut CD is powerful, vivid, and emotionally varied.

She can sing, in short.

If you go immediately here (her homepage), two things will catch your attention.  One is the praise of Hilary written by Twyla Tharp — someone who knows music deeply.  The other is the sound of Hilary singing AUTUMN IN NEW YORK.

Delve a little deeper into her homepage (click on “music”) and you can hear more.

What I hear in THE GREAT CITY is a singer in full command of her lovely vocal instrument.  Hilary has a mature awareness of the bonding and bending that goes on between singer, melody, and words.  She offers us no melodrama, no vocal acrobatics; she honors the notes and the syllables, but she is not constrained by them.

She has chosen to retell the stories that the songs embody, each song a different story.  I hear an elegant restraint lit from within by feeling and understanding.  Hilary is wise enough to let the song carry her, wise enough to have absorbed great singers and instrumentalists, but especially wise enough to be herself.  No Billie, no Betty, no Sarah, no . . . .

The CD is a ripe pleasure — each track its own vignette, so the listener never feels bored by sameness or startled by rough jumps of subject and mood.  Hilary’s range is broad: there are the beautiful AUTUMN IN NEW YORK (verse and two choruses), WHEN THE WORLD WAS YOUNG, a jaunty BROOKLYN BRIDGE, and a swaying YOU CAME A LONG WAY FROM ST. LOUIS.

But her imagination doesn’t limit itself to “the Classics of the Great American Songbook,” and she reaches for Leonard Cohen, Nellie McKay, Tom Waits, and Joni Mitchell, making this CD an appealing anthology of short tales.

Hilary also has a deep awareness of the music’s foundations — without turning the disc into a repertory project.  So her accompanists (and I mean that in the best sense of the word) include Tatum Greenblatt, trumpet; Jason Marshall, tenor saxophone, Jon Cowherd, organ; Randy Napoleon, guitar; Elias Bailey, string bass; Jerome Jennings, drums, and the invaluable Ehud Asherie, piano.  Often the prevailing mood is neo-Basie.  Could that be wrong?

It’s a wonderful debut from an artist who offers us a great deal.  And I predict she will continue to delight us.

If you live in the tri-state area, the news is even more exciting.  Hilary and Ehud will be performing in duet at Smalls (183 West 10th Street, Greenwich Village, New York) on Sunday, April 7, beginning at 7:30.  Details here.  I am looking forward to it . . . please leave a few seats for me in the front row!

May your happiness increase.

JOEL PRESS HAS NEW STORIES — AND NEW YORK STORIES — FOR US

The event didn’t make the mainstream media.  The few print journals devoted to improvised music didn’t report it.  And the “jazz critics” online and off were quite taciturn about it.  But it seems important to note that the surprising saxophonist (tenor and soprano) Joel Press, formerly commuting back and forth between Newton, Massachusetts, and New York City . . . has come to NYC to stay.  Or, as they used to say, “for the nonce.”

If you haven’t heard Joel Press, you could ask pianist Michael Kanan about him. Or perhaps saxophonist Lena Bloch, pianist Spike Wilner, or a dozen other NYC jazz luminaries.  Or you could take the cyber-shortcut and observe this:

Joel’s a creative player with his own sweetly energized internal swing machine, making his own way through the most endearing features of the tradition without being anyone’s repeater pencil or (to use an archaic objective correlative) sheet of carbon paper.  He enjoys standards, ballads, jump blues, and more.  Although he’s been on the scene for more than thirty-two bars, he is no relic, but a vigorous searcher.  He hears rhapsodies and offers them to us.

The good news is more resonant than the fact that Joel now has a new address.  He’s brought his horns, his energy, and his delight in melody with him.  And you can hear it all this coming Saturday (April 6, 2013) at Smalls — 183 West Tenth Street, Greenwich Village, New York) beginning at 7:30 PM.  Joel will be encouraged and supported by three of the finest: Tardo Hammer, piano; Sean Smith, bass; Steve Little, drums.

“Good deal!” to quote Sidney Catlett.

May your happiness increase.

ON THE JAZZ TRAIN, MIRACULOUSLY, WITH GEORGE WEIN’S NEWPORT JAZZ ALL-STARS (April 17-19, 1961): RUBY BRAFF, VIC DICKENSON, PEE WEE RUSSELL, JIMMY WOODE, BUZZY DROOTIN

Thanks to the indefatigable Franz Hoffmann, this treasure!  Twenty-four minutes and thirty-five seconds of live music (and rare conversation) recorded between April 17 and 19, 1961, in Baden-Baden, Germany — by the Newport Jazz All Stars: Ruby Braff, cornet; Vic Dickenson, trombone; Pee Wee Russell, clarinet; George Wein, piano; Jimmy Woode, string bass; Buzzy Drootin, drums.  The program is produced and narrated by the jazz scholar Joachim E. Berendt:

WAY DOWN YONDER IN NEW ORLEANS / CONVERSATIONS / C JAM BLUES:

SUGAR (Pee Wee) / LOVER, COME BACK TO ME:

JAZZ TRAIN BLUES / WHEN YOUR LOVER HAS GONE (Ruby):

I know that we have a million reasons to thank George Wein — going all the way back to Forties Boston and up to this very moment — but I propose that this band and his continued stewardship of NJF All-Star bands is something that hasn’t been sufficiently applauded.  At a time when most of these musicians would have been under-employed or under-paid, George had the foresight to get them gigs all around the world, to encourage them to play a loose personal version of the Mainstream jazz they created so beautifully (having an awfully good time at the piano, too).  Here we have a very vivid reminder of a beautiful band, fueled in equal parts by fun and generosity.

This post is dedicated with gratitude to all the musicians and to Franz Hoffmann, and it is especially for Mal Sharpe, Austin Casey, Destini Sneath, and anyone else who understands hot lyricism.  (And you can read more about this band in Tom Hustad’s monumental Ruby Braff discography, BORN TO PLAY.)

May your happiness increase.

A NEW SONG FOR THE COMMUTE, THANKS TO LEO, RALPH, and RICH

RUSH HOUR

Last night, coming home from The Ear Inn, I tuned in to everyone’s Sunday-night pleasure, THE BIG BROADCAST, that delicious periscope into the first forty or so years of the last century, watched over by the generous and unpredictable Rich Conaty.  (Quick translation: It’s a radio show.  Fordham University Radio, New York, WFUV-FM and streaming: 8 PM to midnight, our time.)  Details  here.

I heard this song — new to me but immediately captivating — IN A ONE-ROOM FLAT.  It isn’t ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE or THANKS FOR THE MEMORY, but it sticks whimsically in the brain.  The 1933 recording is by Freddie Martin and his Orchestra; I believe the singer is Terry Shand, who had deep jazz connections.  And it comes from a Maurice Chevalier musical film called THE WAY TO LOVE (with Ann Dvorak, Edward Everett Horton, and Douglas Dumbrille).

And the song — perhaps one of their trifles? — is by Leo Robin (lyrics) and Ralph Rainger (music), two of my secular saints.

It raises the larger question: what do you need to make you happy?  Worth pondering.  For now, listen a few times and I can almost guarantee that you will be humming it later in the day.

May your happiness increase.