CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND at SAVANNA: THE SECOND SET (July 10, 2013)

The jazz musicians I know get a special pleasure from playing for dancers, watching the moving figures both vibrate to and reflect the music.  Wise swing dancers know there’s a particular delight dancing to a live band instead of an iPod.

Clint Baker and his New Orleans Jazz Band proved this — as they always do — one night about three weeks ago at the Wednesday night swing dance session held at Savanna in San Francisco’s Mission District, known as Cat’s Corner.

Clint, cornet and vocal, was joined by Jim Klippert, trombone and vocal; Bill Carter, clarinet; Jeff Hamilton, piano; Bill Reinhart, banjo; Marty Eggers, string bass; Steve Apple, drums.  Here’s the second set — suitable for at home swing dancing as well — which draw happily on pop tunes of the remembered past.  The first set can be enjoyed here.

IN THE SHADE OF THE OLD APPLE TREE:

SWEET SUE:

THE GIRLS GO CRAZY:

INDIAN LOVE CALL:

CRAZY RHYTHM:

FRANKLIN STREET BLUES:

TIGER RAG:

ST. LOUIS BLUES:

JOE AVERY’S PIECE:

SHAKE THAT THING:

In terms of shaking that thing, everyone, on and off the bandstand, did.  I had to hold on to my tripod to keep it steady.

May your happiness increase!

3 responses to “CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND at SAVANNA: THE SECOND SET (July 10, 2013)

  1. Paul Lindemeyer

    Jazz for dancing allows the musician two parallel collaborations: with the dancers and with es fellow musicians. In jazz that is not for dancing, e must confine es collaboration to the musicians. In the best of circumstances that can make for a deeper and more revelatory art, but most often, it manifests itself as dry, theory-heavy listening and execution. Most jazz players would only benefit from learning to play for dancers.

  2. I agree in part but think that your characterization of jazz that isn’t dance music as “dry, theory-heavy listening and execution” means only that you haven’t heard the right bands, even when sitting still in your uncomfortable seat, Paul.

  3. Stop by my Sunday gig some time Paul and you’ll find a very different ‘scene’. Or ask folks like Randy Reinhart, Dan Barrett, Chuck Redd, John Doughten, Dave Sager, John Royen, (and many others). who have been there, seeing as how you are not actually ‘in the neighborhood’. I do understand your point but, contrary to your statements and a few comments Bill Bissonette made a short while back, there still are places where good jazz, played well can be as much a part of the audience as it is a part of the players. Even out young friend Geoffrey Gallante would be there often if he was old enough to drive! (must be hell to be such a fine young musician and only be….12).

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