Monthly Archives: March 2016

“WOULD YOU CARE TO SWING?” (Part Two): JON-ERIK KELLSO, SCOTT ROBINSON, MATT MUNISTERI, PAT O’LEARY at THE EAR INN (March 20, 2016)

Through the generosity of the musicians, I present some more glorious music created and recorded at The Ear Inn just this month, on March 20, 2016.  And for those who missed the first helping, here it is: swing happiness with great feeling created by Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet; Scott Robinson, tenor saxophone, mellophone, and more; Matt Munisteri, guitar; Pat O’Leary, string bass.

EAR INN 2012

All of this happens when the EarRegulars assemble for one of their Sunday evening raptures (around eight o’clock to around eleven, flexibly) at 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City.

And I now present two more delights from that evening.  (I was going to call this post THE EGGS AND YOU, but the legal staff was not amused, so I dropped the idea.)

I’M PUTTING ALL MY EGGS IN ONE BASKET is the EarRegulars’ nod to Easter, and to Irving Berlin, and to Fred Astaire, and to Louis (whose 1936 Decca recording of this song also features brightly popping drum accents from Stan King).  No drums here, just floating improvisations:

IF I HAD YOU — very groovy, very mello(w), but also sweet and tender:

There’s more to come.  Bless these musicians and their Spring Street shrine.

May your happiness increase!

Advertisements

“SOME TUNEFUL CATS”: STREET OF DREAMS (SAM TAYLOR, GREG RUGGIERO, AIDAN O’DONNELL, BEN CLINESS)

STREET OF DREAMS one

A musician friend I respect told me about this new quartet — called, sweetly, STREET OF DREAMS, and I was instantly pleased by the videos below.  When I shared them with another jazz fancier — like me, a devotee of melodic improvisation — I got back a near-instant response, “Those are some tuneful cats!”  I completely agree, and think you will too.

STREET OF DREAMS two

That’s Sam Taylor, tenor saxophone; Greg Ruggiero, guitar; Aidan O’Donnell, string bass; Ben Cliness, drums.  (I’ve met and video-ed three of the four [so far Ben has been safe from me] and I am proud to know them.)

YOUNG AT HEART:

CLOSE YOUR EYES:

CORCOVADO:

DON’T GET AROUND MUCH ANYMORE:

AFTER YOU’VE GONE:

Melodists, making danceable music that is both deep and gossamer.  Those among us who play or sing know that making melody come alive is not easy. Ask Louis, ask Lester, ask Monk.  And I know that some devout jazz listeners might say that this band is less “innovative” or “adventurous” than they prefer, and I leave them to their search for what they like.

But beauty never has to innovate.  It just is.

To book this group — very new but by no means immature (!) — click here.

May your happiness increase!

“WOULD YOU CARE TO SWING?”: JON-ERIK KELLSO, SCOTT ROBINSON, MATT MUNISTERI, PAT O’LEARY at THE EAR INN (March 20, 2016)

EAR INN 2012

The EarRegulars and The Ear Inn (the latter at 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York — pictured above in October 2012) offer us sweet rewards.  The Inn will soon celebrate its two hundredth anniversary; the EarRegulars are younger but no less beloved.  On Sunday nights at The Ear, a small, gloriously congenial group of musicians gathers to remind us how fine being alive — with ears — can be.  The EarRegulars are led by trumpeter Jon-Erik Kellso, and on March 20, 2016, Jon was joined by his brilliant colleague, Matt Munisteri, guitar; Scott Robinson, tenor saxophone (with the delicious sounds of the mellophone added on later); Pat O’Leary, string bass.

The EarRegulars can tussle in swingtime with the very best, but that Sunday the mood was more gently ruminative: rather than abducting us by force, they wooed and persuaded.  “Hey, do you have a free evening?  Come along with us for sweet swinging music.  You’ll love it.”  As we do.

OUR MONDAY DATE:

BLUE TURNING GRAY OVER YOU:

TEA FOR TWO:

A note about Jon-Erik’s horn, which not only sounds beautiful but has a beautiful personal connection, as he explains: “That horn was my first, and was my dad’s.  A Martin Handcraft Imperial.  About 1934, my dad bought it new as a kid with money earned working in his father’s gas station/garage in Detroit.  I messed it up in high school marching band, and it sat in a closet in my mom’s house all these years.  I recently had it fixed up, to honor my dad’s memory and have it as a memento, and lo and behold, it plays great now!”

It certainly does.  I think we are privileged to share the planet with these musicians, who so generously give of themselves . . . and not on Sunday nights only.  We live in a Golden Age, if we are only wise enough to recognize it.

More to come.

May your happiness increase!

MUSIC IN THE AIR (Part Two): BARBARA ROSENE / EHUD ASHERIE at MEZZROW (February 16, 2016)

Barbara Rosene Ehud

Barbara Rosene is an endearing singer and person. Here’s what I wrote about her in the first posting from a wonderful duo-recital with Ehud Asherie at Mezzrow:

I thought Barbara Rosene was a delightful singer when I first heard her in 2005, and she has become an even deeper pleasure in the years that followed.  Forgive me for writing that an artist has “matured”: people are neither cheese nor wine, but the emotional depths that Barbara reaches now — easily, casually, as if everyone could sing this way — are breathtaking.  She doesn’t just sing the words; she embodies the feeling that animates them.

The first pleasure is simply in Barbara’s voice: not a lulling monochromatic croon, but a resonant instrument lovely at bottom and top, full of quiet shadings.  There’s no harshness, no ironic edge, but she is not an old-fashioned copier of records.  Within eight bars, you can bask in the glow and warmth of her voice itself, but you can also feel her deep understanding of both the melodic contours and the words — the ways in which they complement each other.  I’ve never heard Barbara stand at a distance from the song or deliver any aspect of it mechanically.  She is not in any way a prisoner of that gorgeous instrument; rather, she uses her voice with great fervor and delicacy to send us lovable truths.

And she is a multi-faceted artist.  Were I to present this geographically, I would venture that Barbara is one part Ohio (shined shoes for family dinners, a sweet reverence for the natural world, inherent good manners) and one part Upper West Side (the ability to negotiate a crowded subway or the Sunday-morning rush at Zabar’s — someone who won’t be pushed around).  Maybe it’s the intersection of church and eroticism, of Annette Hanshaw and Bessie Smith. You’ll have to parse that one for yourself.

Barbara has good taste in songs and in musicians — witness her latest duo-performance at Mezzrow with piano wizard Ehud Asherie on February 16, 2016. Ehud is, as always, brilliantly orchestral in solo and tremendously sensitive as an accompanist.

Here is the first part of the evening’s festivities.  And the second follows:

MY MELANCHOLY BABY:

NOBODY CARES IF I’M BLUE:

WEATHER BIRD / TWO DEUCES (an astonishing solo by Ehud, which I have written about here):

THERE’S SOMETHING IN THE AIR (a beautiful song — in the tender way Barbara approaches it — that’s probably unknown to most):

Call the locksmith! YOU’VE GOT THE RIGHT KEY BUT THE WRONG KEYHOLE:

SEEMS LIKE OLD TIMES (thinking of Diane Keaton and Bobby Hackett):

Barbara’s warm embrace of both her songs and her audience is lovely and rare.

May your happiness increase!

GROOVIN’ NOBLY: HOWARD ALDEN, DAN BARRETT, HARRY ALLEN, FRANK TATE, RICKY MALICHI (Sept. 11, 2015)

I think we might need to know more about the wonderfully talented Ray Noble — not only as bandleader, arranger, radio comedian, actor, occasional pianist — but as a composer: think of CHEROKEE, HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE, THE VERY THOUGHT OF YOU, and many others written and co-written by this rather elegantly sedate-looking man:

Ray Noble

One of his evocative songs is THE TOUCH OF YOUR LIPS, which lends itself to many treatments — vocally and instrumentally:

Touch of Your Lips

But here I can offer you a sweetly swaying treatment of the song as a “rhythm ballad,” where sentiment and swing co-exist very pleasingly.  This performance took place at the Allegheny Jazz Party on September 11, 2015: the magical strollers are Howard Alden, guitar; Dan Barrett, trombone; Harry Allen, tenor saxophone; Frank Tate, string bass; Ricky Malichi, drums:

And here is this band’s version of Coleman Hawkins’ STUFFY, which preceded TOUCH in the same set.  Perhaps we’ll meet at this year’s Cleveland Classic Jazz Party (September 15-18) where such good music is created so easily.

And a linguistic after-dinner mint of the highest order.  My dear friend Sarah Spencer presented me with this little verbal gift some months ago, that she learned from the gracious and generous musician (piano and reeds) Gene Riordan: that Louis retitled this song THE LOP OF YOUR CHOPS.  After that, nothing more need be said.

May your happiness increase!

“STUFFY,” NOT STUFFY: HOWARD ALDEN, DAN BARRETT, HARRY ALLEN, FRANK TATE, RICKY MALICHI (Sept. 11, 2015)

Guitarist Howard Alden and trombonist / cornetist Dan Barrett were Southern California buddies and musical colleagues when neither one of them had a driver’s license (they show up on record — with the esteemed Bryan Shaw) first in 1981.  But a few years later, when they were both New Yorkers, they created a quintet with an unusual instrumentation — guitar, string bass, drums, alto doubling clarinet, trombone doubling cornet — that initially had a book of arrangements including many written especially for them by Buck Clayton. In 1986, this recording was the result:

ABQ

Like many other splendid small groups of that time (Soprano Summit and the Braff-Barnes Quartet) they didn’t stay together steadily, but assembled for reunions.  One of their champions, the late Joe Boughton, always made sure that they played at his jazz parties, and I first heard them in person at Jazz at Chautauqua in 2004.  Happily, they’ve continued to appear — with a sub or two — at the Allegheny Jazz Party and they will be a highlight of the 2016 Cleveland Classic Jazz Party.

Here are Howard and Dan with Harry Allen, tenor saxophone; Frank Tate (an original member), string bass; Ricky Malichi, drums, having a good time with the 1945 Coleman Hawkins line, STUFFY:

I know I’ll see them at this year’s Cleveland Classic: I hope you will, too.

May your happiness increase!

AND ALL THROUGH THE HOUSE (Part Two): TAL RONEN’S HOLY MOLY at SMALLS, DECEMBER 24, 2015

Where were you last Christmas Eve?  (I leave a long pause here for the JAZZ LIVES audience to reflect on their answers.)  I was at Smalls, on West Tenth Street in New York City, in the wise and joyous care of this fellow — the imaginative and lively musician and thinker Tal Ronen.

Tal Ronen by Lynn Redmile

Tal Ronen by Lynn Redmile

Here is the first part of that delightful evening concert, featuring Jon-Erik Kellso, Rossano Sportiello, Jay Rattman, Tal, Steve Little, and Tamar Korn — an authentic down-home New York City all-star lineup.  And the highlights of the second half.

SWEET SUE:

I’M PUTTING ALL MY EGGS IN ONE BASKET:

THE SONG IS ENDED:

BLUE SKIES:

(and here is another — quite brief — Korn / Kellso version of this Irving Berlin classic)

DEEP NIGHT:

In a world that seems defined by haste (to where? to what?), private annoyance becoming public hostility . . . it’s wonderful to see Tal, Jon-Erik, Jay, Rossano, Steve, Tamar, and their heartfelt colleagues  spreading love, joy, and kindness in swing.

And a postscript: WHY does this band assemble only on Christmas Eve?  Don’t we need spiritual uplift in the other eleven months?  Club-owners, festival promoters, concert bookers, take heed.

May your happiness increase!