BEAUTY NEEDS NO WORDS: JOE WILDER AND HOWARD ALDEN (Jazz at Chautauqua, September 19, 2009)

O rare and floating sounds!

Even at 10:30 in the morning, the great artists create lovely subtle art — as did Howard Alden, guitar, and Joe Wilder, trumpet and flugelhorn.  This telepathic pair made beauty tangible at the Jazz at Chautauqua weekend in mid-September 2009, and I am delighted to be able to present two duets.

People who knew Joe well will also notice his uncharacteristically informal attire — one of the few times he was ever seen without a suit and tie — and I delight, on SAMBA, that he is using his green plastic cup (‘from the five and ten,” he told me) as a mute.

My videos are characteristically imperfect, even more so because I was not supposed to be shooting them: people pass by and pause, and I think my camera rises and falls with my breathing.  But I’d rather have these moments, preserved.

SECRET LOVE, made famous by Doris Day in 1953:

Luiz Bonfa’s SAMBA DE ORFEU, from the film BLACK ORPHEUS:

Howard has been incredibly gracious about allowing me to video-record him and then to post selected performances: if you search JAZZ LIVES posts, he is part of more than one hundred.  Joe appeared most recently in a 2009 session with Rossano Sportiello, Harry Allen, and Jon Burr, and the first part is here.  Bless them both.

May your happiness increase!

5 responses to “BEAUTY NEEDS NO WORDS: JOE WILDER AND HOWARD ALDEN (Jazz at Chautauqua, September 19, 2009)

  1. Michel Bastide

    PLEASE NOTE MY NEW ADDRESS: docmiba42@gmail.com

    Thanks

    Michel Bastide 13 rue Rabaut St Etienne 30900 Nîmes +33 (0) 620 72 73 74 docmiba42@gmail.com

    >

  2. Sonny McGown

    Michael, thank you for all of your video posts especially during this most difficult time for all of us. The minor warts cannot detract from the high level of musicianship and musicality of the performances. Your videos are uplifting, therapeutic and always bring happiness!

  3. Richard Salvucci

    He could’ve used a donut as a mute and sounded good

  4. He was an extraordinary player, first to last, and a splendidly kind and unassuming man.

  5. There is not a single “lick” or cliche played by Mr Wilder here but an endless outflow of musical interest and intelligence.

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