THE ROMANTIC MR. DICKENSON (1946)

You remember romance?  (Maybe you have one now: I salute you!)  I certainly do.  When we think of romantic jazz, perhaps we think of Bird or Ben with strings, or Chet Baker singing, but Vic Dickenson’s name doesn’t come to mind.  Both his trombone playing and his too-infrequent singing have been called “sly” or “naughty” so often that the words obscure the real depths of feeling he conveyed.

However . . . .

Over his fifty-five year career, Vic created variations on (mostly) romantic themes for  his feature: when I heard him, it was most often IN A SENTIMENTAL MOOD, but he had explored MANHATTAN and SISTER KATE [this last perhaps not terribly romantic, I admit] for extended periods as well.  But Vic’s romantic excursion here is the 1913 YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU (James V. Monaco – Joe McCarthy) extremely popular because of recordings and performances by Al Jolson, Judy Garland, and Harry James.  My theory is that Vic decided to play this song because of Harry’s hit record: he said in print that Harry was his favorite trumpet player.

To set the stage, here are the lyrics:

[Verse 1]
I’ve been worried all day long
Don’t know if I’m right or wrong,
I can’t help just what I say
Your love makes me speak this way,
Why, oh! why should I feel blue,
Once I used to laugh at you,
But now I’m crying,
No use denying,
There’s no one else but you will do,

[Chorus]
You made me love you,
I didn’t want to do it
I didn’t want to do it
You made me want you,
And all the time you knew it
I guess you always knew it,
You made me happy sometimes
You made me glad
But there were times, dear,
You made me feel so bad.
You made me sigh for I didn’t want to tell you
I didn’t want to tell you
I want some love that’s true,
Yes I do,
Deed I do,
You know I do.
Give me give me what I cry for,
You know you got the brand of kisses that I’d die for
You know you make me love you.

[Verse 2]
I had pictured in my mind,
Someday I would surely find,
Someone handsome, someone true,
But I never thought of you,
Now my dream of love is o’er,
I want you and nothing more,
Come on, enfold me,
Come on and hold me
Just like you never did before,

[Chorus]

I’d heard Vic play this on various live recordings, but only recently did I obtain the August 5, 1946 recording with Eddie Heywood, photographed below.  This was the only song recorded at the session, a day before Vic’s fortieth birthday.  He had been ill, and the “second” trombonist, Britt Woodman, stepped aside for this feature.  This was not the Heywood band’s 1944 personnel: Doc Cheatham, Lem Davis, and Sidney Catlett, among others; this was the band in California, with Leonard Hawkins, trumpet; Henry Coker, trombone; Jimmy Powell, alto saxophone; Eddie Heywood, piano; Ernie Shepard, string bass; Keg Purnell, drums — although it would be hard to tell exactly who’s playing on this disc.  Incidentally, Vic recorded YOU MADE ME LOVE  YOU with his own band on the Supreme label in 1947, but with a different arrangement; that version has less energy, and the band is silent.  Perhaps they did not know the routine.

Those details aside, here is Vic’s YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU — with the passionate yearning mixed with a wink at the listener that characterized his work.  To me, it feels like an aria or a soliloquy — not simply a solo improvisation on a venerable pop song:

It’s only one chorus with an extended ending, with two vocal interjections by the band, but what mastery of tone, what fascinating phrasing.  A true storyteller, and what Vic has to tell us about love is remarkable, even if you have to invent your own lyrics.

Note: I may be creating discographical chaos here, because — although unlisted in discographies — I believe that this version of YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU comes from an AFRS “Jubilee” transcription.  It is longer than the Decca version, seems to be in a lower key, and has a discernibly different piano introduction, so I cannot blame the anonymous YouTube poster.  Whatever the source, it’s the version I prefer.  

And here’s Vic, much later in life, sweetly pleased by the sounds he’s hearing:

When I saw him, Vic was taciturn, not simply with fans but it seemed with fellow musicians as well.  But what love he could send out to us!

May your happiness increase! 

2 responses to “THE ROMANTIC MR. DICKENSON (1946)

  1. Check out Vics version with B. Hacket on ‘Dr Jazz’ records. It is a
    masterpiece, his best ever version.

  2. Thanks. I know my Vic well! But that version is not on YouTube so it would not have been easy to share it on the blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s