MEET ME IN AISLE SIX (1957)

The multi-talented Chris Smith has a YouTube channel, as I may have mentioned, that will reward your attention — he’s been uploading out-of-print music by Jim Dapogny, all wonderful, and other treasures.  This morning, a “supermarket record,” an lp sold near the cash register in A&P or Bohack’s, perhaps for 69¢.  The labels were often not terribly honest: Spin-o-Rama, Craftsman, Tops — but you could find RCA Camden there, and there were sessions created specifically for this market, wordplay intentional:

This recording is called DIXIELAND (a musical product as clearly labeled as Ajax or Comet) by “Matty Matlock and his Dixie-Men,” for those who didn’t know of Matty — clarinetist and arranger for twenty years and more before 1957. I know some readers will bristle my open use of the D-word, but the shoppers in Waldbaum’s fifty years ago weren’t as enlightened.  Forgive them, Brother Matthew, for they knew not what they did: they just wanted some good music.

Speaking of good music, how’s this?

Although TISHOMINGO BLUES is First World War vintage, the band has an easy sophisticated glide.  These were musicians who took an afternoon off from studio work — reading Matty’s minimal, shapely charts on familiar songs.  But there’s no cliche, no fake-Roaring Twenties clatter: the band is more Forties-Basie (whisper it!) than Bailey’s Lucky Seven.  Dick Cathcart, trumpet; Abe Lincoln, trombone; Matty Matlock, clarinet; Eddie Miller, tenor saxophone; Stan Wrightsman, piano; Al Hendrickson, guitar; Phil Stephens, string bass; Nick Fatool, drums.  No striped vests, plastic boaters, club-date amateurishness.

Here’s the whole playlist — a wonderful aubade for those so inclined:

Let’s go shopping to this elegantly rousing soundtrack.  Piggly Wiggly has chuck roast at 59¢ / lb.  Don’t be late: we’ll have to ask the manager, Carmine, for a raincheck, and a raincheck won’t feed the four of us.

May your happiness increase!

4 responses to “MEET ME IN AISLE SIX (1957)

  1. GREAT rhythm section! At some point of time, Hendrickson became THE rhythm guitarist in Hollywood and this is a great example why he was so valued in a section. How many of us have passed this record by flipping through the racks?

  2. Cleber Guimaraes Ferreira

    Great Michael. Thank you for that I did knew this record and it’s amazing.
    Al Hendrickson is incredible.

  3. Dear Michael,

    Oh what memories your blog brings back to me. Some of my first record purchases as a youngster were at the Grand Union and Safeway grocery stores in the late 1950s. My mother would sometimes reward me with a record for pushing the cart and unloading the groceries at home. After several outings I procured the entire 12 volume set of the RCA Victor Encyclopedia of Recorded Jazz which were 10 inch LPs that sold for $0.99 each. That set opened my ears to everyone from the ODJB to Charlie Parker. Over 60 years later I still have that compilation in my collection and treasure it dearly.

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