A HOT HALF-HOUR WITH BARNEY BIGARD AND FRIENDS (HERB HALL, BOB WILBER, PEE WEE ERWIN, JOHNNY GUARNIERI, SAMMY PRICE, MAJOR HOLLEY, TOMMY BENFORD): “La grande parade du Jazz,” July 26, 1975.

The wonderful clarinetist Barney Bigard (think Duke, Louis, Joe Oliver, and Django for prominent associations) appeared often at the Nice Jazz Festival, happily, in many different contexts. He is in splendid form, as are Eddie Hubble and Johnny Guarnieri; in fact, the whole band rocks on an extended PERDIDO, a down-home CREOLE LOVE CALL, and a feature for Major Holley, MACK THE KNIFE.

Details:

Barney Bigard, Herb Hall, Bob Wilber, clarinet; Eddie Hubble, trombone; Pee Wee Erwin, trumpet; Johnny Guarnieri, piano; Major Holley, string bass; Tommy Benford, drums. Introduced by Dick Sudhalter. PERDIDO (nearly thirteen minutes) / CREOLE LOVE CALL (Bigard, Hall, WIlber, Sammy Price, Holley, Benford) / MACK THE KNIFE (featuring Major Holley) (“La grande parade du jazz,” performed July 26, 1975; broadcast August 5, 1976).

P.S. I’ve posted a good deal of Barney’s work at Nice and always found it rewarding. Oddly, some of my armchair critics are very severe about “poor Barney, past his prime,” which I find ungenerous in reference to someone born in 1906 playing in the hot July sun outdoors. No, he played differently in 1927, but how many of us run as quickly as we did at 14? Respect the Elders.

May your happiness increase!

4 responses to “A HOT HALF-HOUR WITH BARNEY BIGARD AND FRIENDS (HERB HALL, BOB WILBER, PEE WEE ERWIN, JOHNNY GUARNIERI, SAMMY PRICE, MAJOR HOLLEY, TOMMY BENFORD): “La grande parade du Jazz,” July 26, 1975.

  1. I count myself an “armchair enthusiast” and Bigard sounds great, that wonderful chocolate syrupy New Orleans sound! His Creole Love Call.

    And Major Holley is a wonder. And a wonder that we can hear this so many years later!

  2. Enthusiasts embrace; critics carp. Thank you for your enthusiasm!

  3. Barney Bigard was an original NOLA clarinetist who created his own language, a unique sound vocabulary, then associated with the melody of each song and played on a standard Albert system clarinet.

  4. Duke Seidmann

    To all the armchair fools and know-it-alls out there: Barney Bigard is and remains one of the greatest musicians – not only clarinetists – of his era! He was one of my first inspirations when I was 10 and still is today, almost 50 years later. I had the privilege of seeing him play live and even meeting him in person. Anyone who wants to criticize him should at least be able to reproduce even one of his distinctive runs – not to mention the ability to invent something like that by the meter! Thank you Michael for your bright and heartwarming posts!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s