Category Archives: Wow!

DAN MORGENSTERN REMEMBERS RUBY BRAFF (December 15, 2017)

 

To get us in the proper mood, here are Ruby Braff and Dick Hyman investigating Benny Carter’s ONCE UPON A TIME, a performance that has its light-hearted moments and a very touching ending:

and why stop with one performance only?  SWEET SAVANNAH SUE is one of my favorite recordings of the thousands Ruby created:

Dan’s first musing on Ruby mentions some mutual friends — Ruby’s bio-discographer Tom Hustad, Sam Margolis, Jack Bradley, Loren Schoenberg — but keeps on returning to the well-seasoned enigma that was Ruby himself:

Here is a musical interlude whose relevance will become clear to the conscientious:

More tales of Ruby, Dick Gibson, Ruby in hospice, friends and former friends:

Finally, Ruby and Dick Sudhalter, Ruby as record reviewer, and sidelights on Kenny Dorham and Miles Davis, who will be the subject of the next videos:

I find Dan’s reminiscences invaluable.  He was there.  But more than that, his sharp, friendly observations make a scene come alive.  And he’s taught me an invaluable lesson about interviewing . . . to stay out of the interviewee’s way.  I’ve learned that Dan’s zigzag paths are much more interesting than any list of questions I might have prepared.  Take it from me.

May your happiness increase!

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A MORTONIAN PARADISE, PLUS (ANDREW OLIVER / DAVID HORNIBLOW): A BLOG, TWO VIDEOS, and an e-78, TOO.

When I go to my computer in the morning — a twenty-first century act as natural to us as making a fire in the stove for breakfast must have been years ago — and I see that the Complete Morton Project (a/k/a Andrew Oliver at the piano and David Horniblow at the clarinet, bass clarinet, or alto saxophone) has been at it again while I have been sleeping or attempting to grade student essays, my first feeling is pride — pride that I am living in a world where such beauty is being regularly given to us for free.  Of course, my second thought is, “Oh, no!  I’m falling behind!”  But David and Andrew have been very forgiving, and I have received no lowered grades for tardiness.  And they offer their creations open-handedly and open-heartedly.

Here is the aptly named PEP:

and the NEW ORLEANS BUMP, which should induce dancing everywhere.

I especially like David’s growly evocation of Cecil Scott and other “dirty” clarinetists — the world as it was before Benny smoothed everything out:

There’s more information and music here on Andrew’s blog — which also shows off the considerable talents of the Vitality Five and the Dime Notes — and you can subscribe to these weekly YouTube bouquets of sound here.  And (while I was tidying up the kitchen) the Vitality Five issued their February 2018 e-78: details here.

How will I keep up?  I don’t know.  But it’s a delightful struggle for sure.

May your happiness increase!

BIRD, BECKETT, and THE BEAT: JEFF HAMILTON, CLINT BAKER, ROBERT YOUNG (February 16, 2018)

That’s Jeff Hamilton, piano; Clint Baker, cornet; Robert Young, bass saxophone, brought to us by rara avis Eric Whittington of Bird & Beckett Books at
653 Chenery Street, San Francisco, California: (415) 586-3733, and captured on video by the indefatigable RaeAnn Berry of that same city.

Photograph by Angela Bennett

I needed to share CRAZY RHYTHM with you for Jeff’s splendidly playful introduction and what happens next:

Clint switches to clarinet for IF I HAD YOU:

and sings on a frolicsome I’M CRAZY ‘BOUT MY BABY:

What musical evening would be complete without Alex Hill’s DELTA BOUND?

Bird and Beckett offers a variety of music, readings — a wise comfortable place.  And books.  Of course.

At this writing, RaeAnn has posted fifteen videos, found here.  Her YouTube channel introduced me to the wonders of California hot almost a decade ago, so I value her continued work.

And to Clint, Jeff, Robert, and Eric: thanks for keeping the heat on.  We need it.

May your happiness increase!

BEAUTY, SO RARE: HIDDEN TREASURES FROM JAZZ AT CHAUTAUQUA: JON-ERIK KELLSO, SCOTT ROBINSON, BOB HAVENS, JOHN SHERIDAN, KERRY LEWIS, PETE SIERS (September 23, 2012)

When it’s good, you know it.  When it’s sublime, you feel it.  Here are four previously unseen treasures from the sprawling JAZZ LIVES vault of video sweetness, recorded at the Hotel Athenaeum in Chautauqua, New York, on September 23, 2012, during the delightful gathering of cosmic energies once called “Jazz at Chautauqua,” the creation of Joe Boughton and then Nancy Hancock Griffith.

We take so much for granted, and on paper, this set might just have seemed another pleasing interlude in a long weekend of delights — a Sunday-brunch set focused on the music of Louis Armstrong.  With other players, even such an inspiring theme could have turned into genial formula.  But not with Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet; Bob Havens, trombone; Scott Robinson, metal clarinet, tenor saxophone, and taragoto; John Sheridan, piano; Kerry Lewis, string bass; Pete Siers, drums.

How they soar.  How tenderly they caress the music.  You’ll experience it for yourselves.

First, a WEARY BLUES that gently piles delight upon delight, a  great piece of Hot Architecture reaching toward the sky:

and, with some priceless commentary from Scott Robinson — erudite comedy gently coming to earth as a loving tribute to Joe Muranyi, who loved to play BIG BUTTER AND EGG MAN:

“Right on it,” as they say, with Mr. Robinson on the tenor, for ONCE IN A WHILE, where the rhythm section shines:

If the closing ninety seconds of that performance doesn’t make you jubilant, then perhaps you should consider seeing a specialist.

What could be better to close off such a glorious episode than an expression of gratitude, in this case, THANKS A MILLION, beginning with a Kellso-Sheridan duet on the verse:

I find that performance incredibly tender: gratitude not only from the musicians to the audience, but to Louis and the worlds he created for us.

Perhaps it’s true that “you can’t go home again,” but if I could book a flight to Buffalo in the certainty that I would see this band again, I’d be packed and ready.  Maybe it’s because I can’t get back to this morning in September 2012 in some temporal way that I feel so deeply the precious vibrations these ministers of swinging grace offer us.  Bless them.  It was a privilege to be there, an honor to be allowed to capture this for posterity.

Watch this with full attention; savor it; share it; exult in it.  Let us never take beauty for granted.

May your happiness increase!

SWAT THE DIRT: DAVID HORNIBLOW / ANDREW OLIVER PLAY MORTON (and an e-78 as well!)

As the Silvercup bread sign used to say, radiant in the night sky, BAKED WHILE YOU SLEEP.  Or SWUNG WHILE YOU REST.  Whatever: those men are here again, David Horniblow, clarinet and bass clarinet; Andrew Oliver, piano — for their and our weekly benevolence of Jelly Roll Morton.

That Tinge again . . . sensuous and undulating (a composition Jelly only recorded for Allan Lomax at the Library of Congress sessions):

Here’s DIRTY, DIRTY, DIRTY — a 1940 composition that sounds as if it is going to be very simple and has its own twists and turns.  (I wonder how often it was played on the jukeboxes?)  And the combination of low-register bass clarinet and luminous piano is quite intoxicating:

Subscribe to their YouTube channel here — or enjoy all six offerings with fine commentary on Andrew’s blog here.  Fine music, intelligent compact explications, and inspiring generosity from these two stellar players.

Wait.  You haven’t had enough IRRESISTIBLE JAZZ for the moment?  Look at what The Vitality Five is up to, and you’ll recognize some splendid hot players here as well (David, Andrew, Michael McQuaid, Nicholas Ball, Martin Wheatley):

May your happiness increase!

A SUNNY BLUES IN F: THE FINALE TO “FOREVER WEIRD” (The Kitchen, December 9, 2017) featuring THE MICROSCOPIC SEPTET, THE JAZZ PASSENGERS, and THE KAMIKAZE GROUND CREW

For the story behind this riotous explosion of joys, please visit part one and part two of JAZZ LIVES’ exclusive multi-media coverage, where I posted all of The Microscopic Septet’s set.  Very little could follow Dave Sewelson’s passionate singing of I GOT A RIGHT TO CRY, but saxophonist-visionary Phillip Johnston did not want us to go out into the snowy night feeling lachrymose.

He’d asked members of the other two bands, the Jazz Passengers and the Kamikaze Ground Crew, to hang around for the finale if they felt like it (and no one wanted to miss anything the Microscopic Septet was playing) so at the end, he assembled a giant “JATP-style” jam session on a blues in F he’d written, DON’T MIND IF I DO, for the three bands.

It was clear that if everyone took even twenty-four bars apiece, we would be at the Kitchen well past closing time, so the musicians quickly arranged to play solos in tandem, trade choruses or parts of choruses — a heartwarming reminder that improvisation is more than simply playing one’s instrument, and a delightful reminder of the great players of the Thirties and Forties who could create a whole short story in eight bars.

Here’s the result, first a few minutes of jovial rustling-around, which I think is priceless, then ten minutes of rocking cheerful collective improvisation:

and a lovely postscript, an appreciative review by “TG” in THE NEW YORK JAZZ RECORD:

What a gift to everyone at The Kitchen, which (with the permission of the three bands) I am now able to share with you.

May your happiness increase!

IN THE KINGDOM OF JELLY (Opus Five): DAVID HORNIBLOW and ANDREW OLIVER

Those generous authentic swinging gents — David Horniblow, reeds; Andrew Oliver, piano — are back to give us some more Morton, in what they have (generously and reliably) created, the Complete Morton Project, a weekly series of gifts — Mister Morton’s compositions played imaginatively, with emotion.  And here is this week’s delightful offering: BIG FAT HAM and DEEP CREEK.

The eponymous HAM — named in honor or in satire?  Perhaps a dream of dinner:

and, with David on alto, the yearning blues DEEP CREEK:

You can keep up with David and Andrew here (their YouTube channel) or here (Andrew’s blog — which has his performance schedule as well).  Or, I’ve chronicled their four earlier offerings on JAZZ LIVES here.  Andrew and David also have lives away from the video camera: you can find out with a minimum of effort where they will be playing, in duet or as members of a goodly number of bands.

I hope there are many people applauding their expertise and generosities.  How fresh and lively Morton’s music sounds — not a hint of the dusty archives — reminding me once again how dashing it must have been in its time, and, now, when played by Oliver-Horniblow, how much dazzle it has.

May your happiness increase!