IN ARCADIA WITH MARTIN WHEATLEY and FRIENDS: TOM “SPATS” LANGHAM, MIKE PIGGOTT, LOUIS THOMAS

The birth of a band?  I sincerely hope so.  They are Wheatley’s Arcadians: Martin Wheatley on all variety of guitars and other stringed instruments; Tom “Spats” Langham, guitar, vocal; Mike Piggott, violin; Louis Thomas, string bass.  The excellent cinematography is by guitarist Dave Kelbie (of the Dime Notes and more).  Here’s what I consider their “demo reel” — a montage, hinting at some of the things the Arcadians do so well:

and, just posted today, a complete performance of RUSSIAN LULLABY:

One I nearly missed — which is great fun — DON’T BE ASHAMED OF YOUR AGE:

Messrs. Wheatley, Langham, Piggott, and Thomas might not be (from my vantage point) the most aggressive promoters, preferring the joy of making music to the thrill of sending emails, but I hope fervently that festival promoters, concert bookers, clubowners, the BBC, PBS, NPR . . . . you name it — that people rush to engage this most engaging band.  Arcadia, as you will remember, was seen as a utopia, a place of pleasure and peace, harmony and serenity.  This quartet might not be the only soundtrack one could imagine, but it does summon up a world before the tyrannies of the smartphone.

And a side-note: slightly more than a year ago, Messrs. Wheatley and Langham went into the studio to record what might be their first duet CD, THE LAND OF MIGHT-HAVE-BEEN.  It is one of the more touching recitals in my collection, and I have one copy shelved under W, another under L.  Beautiful playing and singing, with repertoire that — although sometimes obscure — instantly becomes precious: MUSIC, MAESTRO, PLEASE; EVERY DAY AWAY FROM YOU; TOO LATE; MY IDEAL; THE FIRST WEEKEND IN JUNE; THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS; SAY WHEN; THE THRILL IS GONE; P.S., I LOVE YOU; YOU’RE DANCING ON MY HEART; THE LAND OF MIGHT-HAVE-BEEN; GOLDEN EARRINGS; HOW DEEP IS THE OCEAN.  In the ideal world of the previous century, I might have been able to write, “You’ll find it wherever better records are sold,” but I fear that this is no longer the case.  I am sure that Martin could be prevailed upon to offer a copy for sale if asked nicely here.  Perhaps he and Mr. Langham could bring several copies — if there are any left? — to their gigs?

I greet these sweetly expert swing stars and hope for more Arcadian manifestations.  We need beauty like this.  Seriously.

May your happiness increase!

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“CARE TO DANCE?”: ANDREW OLIVER and DAVID HORNIBLOW PLAY MORTON

It’s Those Men Again: pianist Andrew Oliver and reedman David Horniblow for our weekly benificence of Jelly Roll Morton: their gift to us, the Complete Morton Project, to which you certainly should subscribe . . . it’s free, beautifully done and recorded.

More unpretentious erudition here.

First, THE CRAVE, the nearly-hypnotic exploration of the Spanish Tinge, which Jelly recorded for the Library of Congress in an extended take, and for General as a 10″ 78.

Here’s what we crave in 2018:

MINT JULEP is less famous, but was commercially recorded for Victor in 1929, when Morton took a slightly cut-down version of the Luis Russell band into the studios:

Thanks go to Andrew and David for our weekly helpings of lyrical swinging hot jazz — finely-tuned dance music as well.

May your happiness increase!

UNEARTHED TREASURES: MARTY GROSZ, DUKE HEITGER, DAN BARRETT, DAN BLOCK, SCOTT ROBINSON, ROSSANO SPORTIELLO, JON BURR, RICKY MALICHI at JAZZ AT CHAUTAUQUA (September 22, 2012)

A few more previously unseen beauties from the September 2012 appearance of Marty Grosz and his Sentient Stompers at the much-missed Jazz at Chautauqua, held at the Hotel Athenaeum.

Faithful readers will know I and my team of Oxford University-trained archaeologists have been uncovering marvels this year, featuring (collectively) Marty, Andy Schumm, Scott Robinson, John Sheridan, Kerry Lewis, Pete Siers, Jon-Erik Kellso, and Bob Havens.  The findings are on view here, and here,  and here.  Don’t push; don’t crowd.  All of them, including this post, come with great gratitude to Nancy Hancock Griffith, and those of us who were there know why.

And now, three more marvels by the gentlemen listed in the post’s title.  For the uninitiated, Marty Grosz, guitar and occasional banter; Duke Heitger, trumpet; Dan Barrett, trombone; Scott Robinson, taragoto, tenor saxophone; Dan Block, clarinet, bass clarinet, and trumpet; Rossano Sportiello, piano; Jon Burr, string bass; Ricky Malichi, drums.  And you’ll notice that these splendid improvisers are also sight-reading Marty’s arrangements, another thing to admire them for.

First a very Ellingtonian approach to the theme of erotic expertise:

Then, a swinging arrangement of TOO MARVELOUS FOR WORDS, with an intro that sounds like BIG CHIEF DE SOTA (also circa 1937) and with room for a wonderful surprise: Dan Block on trumpet:

Musical savagery from the early Thirties, with Dan Block’s bass clarinet solo:

What treasures!  To me, worth more than unearthed Troy.  But that’s just me.

May your happiness increase!

EMBRACED WARMLY BY MUSIC: DANNY TOBIAS, GEORGE RABBAI, PHIL ORR, PAT MERCURI, JOE PLOWMAN (Part Three): March 24, 2018

THIS JUST  IN: Danny and George will be back at the 1867 Sanctuary on Saturday, September 22, from 2-4 PM.  Mark it down.)

Here are the closing performances — the second set — from a lovely afternoon of rewarding music.  Those who missed the first two segments may savor them here.


That picture gives all the needed details, but it can’t convey the genial loving spirit that animated the music: friendly conversations among players who deeply respect and value each other, on and off the bandstand.  And you would have to be at the 1867 Sanctuary to hear how fully it welcomes creativity.

A feature for the rhythm section, led by the lyrical Mr. Plowman — from GUYS AND DOLLS:

The great Fifties Basie groove on a composition by Freddie Green:

Danny’s romp on familiar chord changes (test yourself!) which is also the title of his latest CD, COMPLETE ABANDON:

Danny’s feature — THESE FOOLISH THINGS — on his special new / old cornet:

A gorgeous bouquet of sound, scored for two fluegelhorns, EMILY:

And the brief closing selection, IT’S YOU OR NO ONE:

What wonders!  I believe that Danny and George have talked of doing another afternoon performance at the unique 1867 Sanctuary and I hope this comes to fruition soon.  All I can tell you is that I left the address in my car’s GPS and I will keep it there.  “Worth a trip from anywhere!” as a radio commercial used to tell us.  Thank you, Danny, George, Joe, Phil, Pat, Bob and Helen Kull, Caroline Roth, Lynn Redmile, and everyone else who made this possible.

May your happiness increase!

MELLOWLY: THE ANDY BROWN QUARTET at STUDIO5 (February 23, 2018): ANDY BROWN, JEREMY KAHN, JOE POLICASTRO, PHIL GRATTEAU

Guitarist Andy Brown makes lovely music on his own, and he has great taste in musicians.  Here he is with stellar friends, live at Studio5 in Evanston, Illinois, on February 23, 2018. The video — just posted on YouTube — contains six extended performances from that night.

The players are Andy; Jeremy Kahn, piano; Joe Policastro, string bass; Phil Gratteau, drums.  And the songs are CHEESECAKE; GROOVEYARD; ESTAMOS AI, IDLE MOMENTS; ZING! WENT THE STRINGS OF MY HEART; RECEIPT PLEASE.

I don’t think that this performance needs any explication from me: it’s beautifully balanced, sophisticated swinging jazz, melodic and playful.

And, to give credit where it is due, this concert was part of the Live at Studio5 Jazz Series: http://www.steverashidpresents.com.  Visit Andy’s website here.  And if you missed the November 2017 delicately profound duo-recital of Jeremy and Andy, I urge you to see it here.

May your happiness increase!

“Signed in person from original owner, 100% authentic and lifetime guarantee. Original with Lewis Allen composer credit, Sonny White is the pianist, Commodore first edition 10″ shellac 78 rpm V/V+ condition.”

Something new and old and rare and fragile and lasting and irreplaceable.  And fifteen thousand dollars (15,000.00 USD, as they say).  This is the link.

And the label of the precious object:

And the music:

Check the jar in the kitchen where you toss the quarters.  Who knows what’s added up there?

But I wonder what Billie would say of this offering.

May your happiness increase!

MASTERS OF MODERN MUSIC: DAN MORGENSTERN RECALLS DIZZY GILLESPIE, JAMES MOODY, TADD DAMERON (December 15, 2017)

Our man in jazz Dan Morgenstern has always distinguished himself by his happy ability to hear good things wherever he goes; his range is not limited by styles and schools.  So it’s not surprising that he should be so fond of the “new music” that greeted him on his arrival in the United States in the second half of the Forties.

His recollections of Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, and Tadd Dameron are not only tributes to their music, but to their warm personalities.

First, a brief soundtrack: Dizzy’s 1945 recording of Tadd’s GOOD BAIT (with Don Byas, Trummy Young, Clyde Hart, Oscar Pettiford, and Shelly Manne):

and, from 1971, the same GOOD BAIT as performed by Moody and Al Cohn, Barry Harris, Sam Jones, Roy Brooks:

Then, Dan’s very affectionate portrait of Dizzy, which ends up in Corona, Queens, with a famished John Birks foraging for snacks at a friend’s house:

Intimately connected with Dizzy, James Moody, another joy-spreader:

And finally, the vastly influential Tadd Dameron:

This post is in honor of my dear friend Doug Pomeroy, who — like Dan — continues to spread joy.

May your happiness increase!