Tag Archives: Ben Cummings

VIPERS and MOCKINGBIRDS, LYRICISM and SWING: EMMA FISK and FRIENDS RECALL EDDIE SOUTH and STUFF SMITH at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (Nov. 3, 2013)

The very expressive swinging violinist Emma Fisk was given a difficult assignment — to summon up the ghosts of Stuff Smith (violently, dramatically hot) and Eddie South (elegance personified) in thirty minutes at the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party.  I’d give her and her colleagues very high marks at this nearly-impossible task.

The colleagues are Jeff Barnhart, piano and vocal (hear him romp on the verse to LADY BE GOOD — a feat that astonishes the band — as well as on a block-chord solo on SKIP IT), the ceaselessly rocking Richard Pite, drums; the energized Henri Lemaire, string bass; the versatile Spats Langham (called upon to be Django for seven choruses of uplifting accompaniment on EDDIE’S BLUES), and two guest stars to take us close to the Onyx Club Boys of fabled memory, Ben Cummings, trumpet (hidden behind someone’s coif, but he comes through clear as a bell); Jean-Francois Bonnel, clarinet.

Here they are — recorded on November 3, 2013, nimbly being themselves while honoring departed masters.

IF YOU’RE A VIPER (thank you, Jeff!):

MAMA MOCKINGBIRD (for Hoagy and Eddie):

LADY BE GOOD:

EDDIE’S BLUES:

SKIP IT:

Well played, Emma, Jeff, Spats, Henri, Richard, Ben, and Jean-Francois!

And I know that Emma has a feature set at this year’s Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party called FIDDLESTICKS in honor of Signor Venuti, which I know will be fun.

May your happiness increase!

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THE BASIE WAY: MATTHIAS SEUFFERT HONORS COUNT BASIE at WHITLEY BAY (Nov. 3, 2013)

William Basie persists as a model and mentor even though he is no longer at the keyboard. Regarding the world with a cheerful amused skepticism, he embodied truths long before they were adopted as cultural cliche: less is more; the medium is the message; ‘t’ain’t what ‘cha do; give away those things not meant for you; the blues cure the blues.

Basie would have brushed such praise away, but he is Thoreau who chose the bandstand over the beanfield, a great abstract painter without a brush; a prophet whose message was primarily silence and joy, making the universe swing.

We can’t go backwards to the youthful glory of the Basie band of the late Thirties, except by listening to the airshots, the Deccas, and the Columbias, but this band has some of the unbuttoned joyous energy of the real thing (with a few leaps forward).  It’s not an outright imitation, which is a good thing, but it moves in the same happy directions.

This endearing evocation — captured at the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party — is led by Matthias Seuffert, reeds, with Jean-Francois Bonnel, Gavin Lee, Claus Jacobi, saxophones; Duke Heitger, Ben Cummings, Andy Woon, trumpets; Alistair Allan, Graham Hughes, trombone; Keith Nichols, piano; Roly Veitch, guitar; Henri Lemaire, string bass; Richard Pite, drums.

JIVE AT FIVE:

LESTER LEAPS IN:

A more recent effort in this swinging manner, Buck Clayton’s CLAYTONIA (originally recorded for Vanguard in 1957, then brought to life once more for the Buck Clayton Legacy Band, still floating):

SHOE SHINE BOY (evoking Chicago, 1936):

BLUE AND SENTIMENTAL (for Herschel):

POUND CAKE:

and a leisurely romp through ONE O’CLOCK JUMP:

Let us live our lives the Basie way — gently improving the universe as we go.

May your happiness increase!

A ROSARY OF TEARS: CECILE McLORIN SALVANT SINGS AT WHITLEY BAY (November 1, 2013)

The very intense young singer Cecile McLorin Salvant sings MEMORIES OF YOU, which we don’t always characterize as a memorable “torch song,” at the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, with the estimable assistance of Ben Cummings, trumpet; Alistair Allan, trombone; Jean-Francois Bonnel, tenor saxophone; Martin Seck, piano; Malcolm Sked, string bass; Spats Langham, guitar; and Nick Ward, drums. For details about this year’s Classic Jazz Party, please click here.

May your happiness increase!

MORE FROM THE JAM SESSION at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY: ANDY SCHUMM, MATTHIAS SEUFFERT, LARS FRANK, KRISTOFFER KOMPEN, STEPHANE GILLOT, JEFF BARNHART, JACOB ULLBERGER, HENRI LEMAIRE, JOSH DUFFEE, BEN CUMMINGS (November 1, 2013)

It was dark in the Victory Pub, located in the middle of the Village Newcastle hotel — the site of the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party — after the regular mini-concerts had concluded. But jazz players thrive in the dark.

And although the Classic Jazz Party successfully evokes and sometimes reproduces the great jazz performances of the past, sometimes I think the deepest evocations of jazz’s free-wheeling spirit happen after hours, where there isn’t a manuscript page in sight.

Collectively, the expert roisters were Andy Schumm, cornet; Jeff Barnhart, keyboard; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Stephane GIllot, alto saxophone; Lars Frank, Matthias Seuffert, tenor saxophone; Jacob Ullberger, guitar; Henri Lemaire, string bass, Josh Duffee, drums. Ben Cummings, trumpet. Other luminaries may be there, audible but hardly visible. If I’ve omitted anyone, I do apologize and offer to make corrections and reparations. It was delightful to be there; it delights me to revisit these videos; and I am delighted to think of being at the Classic Jazz Party in November 2014.

I SURRENDER, DEAR:

WHO?:

A SMOOTH ONE:

SWING THAT MUSIC:

AT SUNDOWN:

As I was packing up my camera (my eyelids were falling down — it’s a long day behind the video camera!) they had launched into a short, emotive NEW ORLEANS, and then a version of I’M A DING DONG DADDY that owed a good deal to SLIM’S JAM . . . if you can imagine it.  See you at the 2014 Classic Jazz Party, which will begin with a jam session / concert by the Union Rhythm Kings on Thursday, November 6, 2014.  Not to be missed.

May your happiness increase!

ACES OF RHYTHM: BEN CUMMINGS, JEAN-FRANCOIS BONNEL, KEITH NICHOLS, JACOB ULLBERGER, PHIL RUTHERFORD at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (November 2, 2013)

Jabbo Smith — that precise daredevil, that trumpet superhero — has often been emulated but rarely equalled.  This hot little band in honor of Jabbo’s searing Rhythm Aces recordings does everything mere mortals could do in Jabbo’s honor, with delightfully incendiary results: Ben Cummings, trumpet / vocal; Jean-Francois Bonnel, reeds; Keith Nichols, piano; Jacob Ullberger, banjo; Phil Rutherford, brass bass. This session took place on November 2, 2013, at the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party. You might want to have an iced drink handy before viewing this set: it raises the temperature of the room precipitously.

ACE OF RHYTHM:

BOSTON SKUFFLE:

MICHIGANDER BLUES:

LINA BLUES:

JAZZ BATTLE:

As brilliant as this hot evocation was, it wasn’t an isolated event at the 2013 Party (more videos to come as proof) and I know it will happen again, over and over in different contexts, at this year’s Party — details here.

Thanks to Clint Baker and David Jellema for assistance and inspiration, as always.

May your happiness increase!

CECILE McLORIN SINGS FOR BENNY CARTER

and for unrequited and unsuccessful love and lovers of all kinds.

Here, the passionate Ms. McLorin offers her own version of Benny Carter’s 1933 LOVE, YOU’RE NOT THE ONE FOR ME — at the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party. Her colleagues are Ben Cummings,trumpet; Alistair Allan, trombone; Jean-Francois Bonnel, tenor saxophone; Martin Seck, piano; Malcolm Sked, string bass; Spats Langham, guitar; and Nick Ward, drums. Recorded on November 1, 2013:

I hope you can make it to the 2014 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, where musical beauty flourishes.

May your happiness increase!

VIBRATING WITH PASSION, CECILE McLORIN SALVANT SINGS “BODY AND SOUL” (WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY, November 1, 2013)

I first heard Cecile McLorin Salvant sing at the Whitley Bay International Jazz Festival — I think it was 2010 — and she made a powerful impact.

Three years later, the band supporting her at this set was Ben Cummings, trumpet; Alistair Allan, trombone; Jean-Francois Bonnel, tenor saxophone; Martin Seck, piano; Spats Langham, guitar; Malcolm Sked, string bass; Nick Ward, drums.

Admirable and empathic fellows, one and all, but our focus is on Ms. McLorin Salvant, fully immersed in this “torch song,” perhaps the most famous of them all, BODY AND SOUL, allowing the song to flow through her . . . to reach us:

A powerful expression of emotions.

May your happiness increase!