Tag Archives: Bill Sinclair

SARAH AT SARAH’S: AUGUST 28, 2016 (Part Two)

sarah-spencer

On August 18, 2016, Sarah Spencer — the UK-born phenomenon on saxophones and vocal — led a quartet that created romping New Orleans jazz.  This took place at the happily named Sarah’s Wine Bar in Ridgefield, Connecticut, where a Jazz Masters Series takes place on the last Sunday of each month.  Sarah’s colleagues are banjoist /singer Jimmy Mazzy, pianist Bill Sinclair, bassist / tubaist Art Hovey.

Here is Part One, and here are two special features by the lyric troubadour and entertainer Jimmy Mazzy from that same evening.

And here are some more delights.

SMILE, DARN YA, SMILE:

A cautionary sermon on the virtues of taciturnity, Morton’s BIG LIP BLUES (which starts out with an unintentional reference to A. A. Milne):

ROYAL TELEPHONE:

And the closing numbers with special significance for Sarah and all of us, I’M WITH YOU WHERE YOU ARE:

GOIN’ HOME / TILL WE MEET AGAIN:

Sarah, as she points out, will be returning home to the UK on January 3, 2017 — although she promises to visit us again for gigs in the autumn.  Wherever she goes, she will spread joy, as she has here.

May your happiness increase!

SARAH AT SARAH’S: AUGUST 28, 2016 (Part One)

sarah-spencer

My friend Sarah Spencer (tenor and soprano saxophone, clarinet, vocal) is an impeccable hybrid.  London-born, New Orleans-sourced.  Although her speaking voice and cadences are purest UK, her musical soul is situated somewhere on the Rue Conti.  And, yes, she encountered Raymond Burke and Percy Humphrey and several dozen Masters, now-Ancestors in her musical and spiritual development.

On August 28, 2016, I had the very pleasant opportunity to hear and record Sarah and her Quartet (Jimmy Mazzy, banjo and vocal; Art Hovey, string bass and tuba; Bill Sinclair, piano and vocal) at the Jazz Masters Series at Sarah’s Wine Bar (an outgrowth of Bernard’s, a wonderful restaurant) in Ridgefield, Connecticut.  (The Jazz Masters Series is held on the last Sunday of each month.)

Before we begin, here are two performances featuring Jimmy Mazzy from that evening.  One is eloquently tender; the other ribald.  You’ll be able to tell them apart.

And several emotionally energized highlights from the first set.  (I’ve left the beginnings unedited, for the most part, so that you can see the endearing friendly exchanges among the quartet)

ANYTIME:


MY MEMPHIS BABY:


BOGALUSA STRUT:


THE LAUGHING SAMBA:

WE’LL MEET AGAIN:

Part Two will be along anon.

May your happiness increase!

THE WORLDS OF JIMMY MAZZY (SARAH’S WINE BAR, August 28, 2016)

I had heard a great deal about the lyric troubadour Jimmy Mazzy (also a wonderful banjo player, raconteur, songhound, and more) but had never encountered him in person until late August.  It was a phenomenal experience. No, it was two phenomenal experiences.

Photograph thanks to New England Traditional Jazz Plus, http://www.nejazz.com

Photograph thanks to New England Traditional Jazz Plus, http://www.nejazz.com

Jimmy was part of the Sarah Spencer Quartet: Sarah, tenor saxophone and vocals; Bill Sinclair, piano; Art Hovey, string bass and tuba — playing a gig at the wonderful Sarah’s Wine Bar in Ridgefield, Connecticut.  (Facebook calls Sarah’s a “pizza place,” which is like calling the Mona Lisa a smiling lady.)  More about Sarah’s below.

And more about the saxophone-playing / singing Sarah Spencer  in a future blogpost, with appropriate audio-visuals.

Sometimes the finest music is created when it appears no one is paying attention: the live recordings, the music that’s captured while the engineers are setting up or in between takes (WAITIN’ FOR BENNY and LOTUS BLOSSOM are two sterling examples that come to mind).  In a few instances, I’ve brought my camera to the soundcheck or to the rehearsal because the “We’re just running this through” ambiance is a loose friendly one — shirtsleeves and microphone-adjusting rather than the musicians’ awareness of tables of expectant listeners. In that spirit, I offer Jimmy’s seriously passionate version of Lonnie Johnson’s TOMORROW NIGHT.

I think you see and feel what I mean about Jimmy as a passionate singer / actor / troubadour.  If a maiden had Jimmy beneath her balcony, serenading like this, she would know that he was offering his whole heart to her with no restraint and no artifice yet great subtle powerful art.  Those of us in the audience who aren’t maidens and perhaps lack a balcony can hear it too.

But Jimmy is a sly jester as well — totally in control of his audience (even though there’s a long, drawn-out “Ooooooh, no!” from Carrie Mazzy, Jimmy’s wife, at the start of this anthropological exegesis):

Jimmy Mazzy, two of a kind.  And more.  Irreplaceable.

And there will be more from this session.  Now, some words about the delightful locale: Sarah’s Wine Bar in Ridgefield, Connecticut, features world-class jazz music on the last Sunday of every month.  But that’s not the whole story: Ken and Marcia Needleman are deeply devoted to the art form, and they’ve been presenting it in style since 2009.  Ken is a guitar student of Howard Alden’s, and he decided that he wanted to bring top jazz musicians to perform in an intimate setting (with excellent food and fine acoustics).  They found kindred spirits in Sarah and Bernard Bouissou, restaurateur and chef of Bernard’s, one floor below the wine bar.

Thus the Jazz Masters Series began in February 2009, and I’ll mention only a double handful of the musicians who have played and sung to enthusiastic audiences: Howard Alden, Bucky Pizzarelli, Gene Bertoncini, Dick Hyman, Rossano Sportiello, Mark Shane, Frank Wess, Scott Robinson, Harry Allen, Warren Vache, Ken Peplowski, Dan Levinson, Jon-Erik Kellso, Rufus Reid, Jay Leonhart, Cameron Brown, Matt Wilson, Akira Tana, Joe LaBarbera, Mike Mainieri, Cyrille Aimee, Karrin Allyson.

The food critic who writes JAZZ LIVES wants to point out that the food was wonderful and the presentation delightful.  Sarah’s Wine Bar would be a destination spot if the only music was the humming heard in the kitchen.

But right now I want to hear Jimmy sing TOMORROW NIGHT again.

May your happiness increase!

SARAH SPENCER’S TRANSATLANTIC BAND! (2015)

SARAH SPENCER

I first met Sarah Spencer (tenor and soprano saxophones and vocal) slightly more than a year ago and was immediately impressed by her deep immersion in the music — more specifically, New Orleans jazz (think of Cap’n John Handy) with digressions into Red Allen and J. C. Higginbotham, Al Bowlly, and others far and wide.  I wouldn’t get into a discussion of what “authentic” jazz is — too many potholes and roller skates left on the stairs — but Sarah played and sang in ways that seemed to come right from the heart, and she did her idols honor by evoking them while being herself.

Sarah had recorded several CDs but not much recently, so her new one — a selection of music recorded on location (Rochester, New York, October 18 / 19, 2015) is very much welcome.

SARAH CDand the other side:

SARAH CD 2I think the details are readable, but a few words about the music are apropos.

First off, it’s her TRANSATLANTIC BAND.  Sarah was born in the UK, and trombonist / vocalist Mike Owen made the trip especially for the session.  The other members of the ensemble live and work on the East Coast, from Connecticut to Massachusetts, and their names should be familiar to traditional jazz devotees in that “Northeast corridor.”

The band is a refreshing hybrid.  I think that someone deep into the recorded legacy will recognize some respectful nods to legendary performances, but this is not an hour-and-change of “playing old records live.”  It’s audible immediately that this is a band that values both individual expression and ensemble improvisation, and several performances absolutely get up and romp as they gain momentum.  (It’s the kind of band where cornet and trombone both have metal derby mutes set up in front of them, if you get the reference.)

You can hear an enthusiastically involved audience, but no one claps along, whether on the beat or near it.

Sarah is distinctive — her rolling, bubbling tenor and soprano work goes in and out of the band (she thinks of herself often as a member of the rhythm section as well as a front-line soloist) and for all the people who come up to her after a set and say, “You really should listen to ______ or _______,” people she admires, she follows the more obscure but also satisfying path of Manny Paul.  Her singing is truly gutty and rich, fervent and occasionally raw (when the material demands it) and she never stands at a distance from the song, but jumps right in.

Here are two samples from the sessions, with a slide show of the players.

One begins the CD (a bit of whimsy, perhaps?): GET OUT OF HERE AND GO HOME:

and here’s LOVE SONGS OF THE NILE (video first, sheet music cover below:

LOVE SONGS OF THE NILE cover

Other delightful vocal highlights on the disc come from Messrs. Mazzy and Owen, both deep into their own particular grooves.

The selections on the disc are wisely and sweetly arranged so that variety — not in some irritating way — is the principle.  Tempos, keys, and approaches vary from song to song, and there are several performances that are slower than medium tempo (always pleasing) with a stomping samba, sidelong glances at NOLA street parade conventions, and some deep blues.  The recording has some of the endearing imperfections that come with a live session (and I emphasize endearing) — all the things that I would rather have than the sometimes chilly perfection of a studio recording.

I’ve listened to the CD twice since its arrival yesterday, and I don’t see it as being shelved any time soon.  It’s honest, juicy music.  To get a copy for yourself, your friends, your extended family, email Sarah herself at sarahtsax@aol.com and let her know your thoughts.  The financial details are $20 for each disc (including postage and packing within the US); £15 (as above) in the UK.  Other countries will have their own special economic deals, and I am sure that Sarah would listen intently to a conversation about quantity pricing for double-digit orders.

May your happiness increase!

SARAH SPENCER STOMPS IT DOWN (June 7, 2015)

SARAH SPENCER

I feel so fortunate to have met the delightfully authentic Sarah Spencer about 72 hours ago.

Although Sarah didn’t bring her tenor saxophone to Tamar Korn’s Sunday afternoon soiree at Casa Mezcal, she did sit in and sing a 1928 Ma Rainey blues, HEAR ME TALKIN’ TO YOU.  Her singing initially hits with the force of a phenomenon that should be reported on the Weather Channel, but those who listen closely will hear an entreaty, a tenderness beneath the seriously forthright power.  She’s accompanied by Andy Stein, baritone saxophone; Ehud Asherie, piano (the latter bringing some Ellington and Hines down to New Orleans):

If you weren’t at Casa Mezcal, you have another chance right away to immerse yourself in Sarah’s swinging world — a Saturday-night gig on June 20 from 8 to midnight.  It’s at the Windmill Tavern at 400 Hollister Street, Stratford, Connecticut.  The phone number for reservations is 203-378-6886.  No cover, no minimum.

Sarah explains, “The band is Sarah Spencer’s Transatlantic Band and we play New Orleans Music – from Piron to Professor Longhair (and always hot and dirty!)  People can check out my website here.  The personnel for the gig is Sarah Spencer, tenor sax and vocal; Fred Vigorito, cornet; Bill Sinclair, piano; Art Hovey, tuba and string bass; Molly Sayles, drums.  It looks like there is a load of room to dance so people should come with their dancing shoes and be prepared to shake it in good New Orleans fashion (or any other way they see fit)!”

You know what to do.  And obviously so does Sarah.

P.S.  I told Sarah that her photograph was terrifying, and she grinned and said, “That’s my best butt-kicking, hard-blowing, get outta ma way cos I’m comin’ through photo — my cutting contest face.  But I’m a big squishy inside.”  She is both of those people, and I hope you get a chance to find out for yourself.

May your happiness increase!