Tag Archives: Cleveland Classic Jazz Party

“SEPTEMBER SONG”: DAN BLOCK, EHUD ASHERIE, KERRY LEWIS, HAL SMITH (Cleveland Classic Jazz Party, Sept. 15, 2016)

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I think that the creation of beauty is a noble act, a way to brighten the darkness, to refresh the weary: like offering water to the thirsty or helping someone terribly lost find the way home.

These four artists — Dan Block, tenor saxophone; Ehud Asherie, piano; Kerry Lewis, string bass; Hal Smith, drums — made beauty not only possible but tangible and accessible on Thursday night, September 15, 2016, at the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party, with their performance of SEPTEMBER SONG.  Absorb it deeply and return to mundane life with your load lightened:

 

Details of the 2017 Party are here.  It’s an extremely rewarding event — a weekend of uplifting music among friends.

May your happiness increase!

TWELVE STRINGS, THREE IMPROVISERS: JON BURR, FRANK TATE, KERRY LEWIS (Cleveland Classic Jazz Party, September 2016)

Jon Burr. Photo by Koko Burr.

Jon Burr. Photo by Koko Burr.

I know the joke about keeping bass solos at bay by any means possible, but surely this ensemble — three very eloquent players joining together for two classics of the jazz repertoire — is remarkable in its delicacy, power, and swing.  I prefer what Milt Hinton told audiences, that the bass is the foundation, that it is basic to all music.  Milt would have loved this little gathering of like-minded creators, and he would have admired how quickly they make beautiful music with no fuss.  Yes, there’s another joke about how people talk during bass solos, but after thirty seconds and two righteous hisses of “Shush!” this music got the rapt attention it deserves.

Simple math: twelve strings, three basses, three eloquent players, four-four time, two compositions.  The results: lasting pleasure.  The musicians (left to right): Jon Burr, Frank Tate, Kerry Lewis.  The place: the Thursday-night informal session at the 2016 Cleveland Classic Jazz Party, September 15, 2016.

WHAT IS THIS THING CALLED LOVE? (without the whimsical comma):

and Charlie Parker’s 1945 blues line, BILLIE’S BOUNCE, named for manager Shaw, not luminary Holiday:

This year’s Cleveland Classic Jazz Party will take place September 14-17, 2017, at the Wyndham Hotel in Playhouse Square in Cleveland, Ohio.  Mark your calendars now, and visit here for more information.

May your happiness increase!

IN THE RIVER THAT IS TIME: DAN BLOCK’S TRANSFORMATIONALISTS (Cleveland Classic Jazz Party, September 17, 2016)

I think of Dan Block as the main character in a Ray Bradbury story.  Friendly but mysterious, he comes to a small town in the Midwest and puts up a banner advertising his TRANSFORMATIONALISTS: “Time Is But The Stream We Go Fishing In / Come With Us!”  A middle-school trombonist hesitantly approaches the Magical Transormationalist, falls under the spell of the music, and when the band leaves town, she goes with them, entranced, on to glories yet undiscovered.

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When Dan has led his “Harlem in the Thirties Updated” group at Fat Cat and other venues, I’ve not counted the audience members to see if anyone went missing.  But we were certainly entranced and remain so.

A version of Dan’s magic troupe performed a brief set at the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party in September 2016: Dan, alto saxophone / arrangements; Scott Robinson, tenor saxophone; Ehud Asherie, piano; Jon Burr, string bass; Ricky Malichi, drums.  The repertoire came from famous bands (Andy Kirk, Fletcher Henderson, Benny Carter) and was written by Mary Lou Williams, Carter, and others — but it sounded fresh, rather than being a distillation of famous records.

The opener, associated with Chick Webb, HARLEM CONGO:

Mary Lou Williams’ composition (I believe Puddin’ Head was trumpeter Edgar Battle):

another Mary Lou creation:

Something for and from Benny Carter:

And, finally, an early version of climate change from the 1934 Henderson band:

Inventive and wholly satisfying.  Another version of the Block Transformationalists will be playing at Smalls on West Tenth Street on February 3, 2017, with the group that performed this music at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola. Mark your perpetual calendars, please.

May your happiness increase!

IN WALKED BLOCK: EHUD ASHERIE, KERRY LEWIS, HAL SMITH, DAN BLOCK at the CLEVELAND CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (September 15, 2016)

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This performance doesn’t need much prelude, except to say that it is an eight-minute improvisation by four masters (Ehud Asherie, piano, Kerry Lewis, string bass; Hal Smith, drums; Dan Block, walking in, tenor saxophone) on BEAN STALKING, Coleman Hawkins’ line on the chord changes of IDAHO, recorded at the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party this past September:

Why the beany title?  Hawkins’ nickname was Bean — whether, as Phil Schaap attests, it was Best and Only, thus B and O, or for other reasons, I can’t say.  But Hawkins recorded BEAN SOUP, BEAN-A-RE-BOP, and other legume-based titles that have eluded me.  (No need to write in; just enjoy the video.)

The Cleveland Classic Jazz Party continues to offer such delights in profusion.  And there’s never any need for Beano.

I don’t know their 2017 dates, but will inform you when I do.

May your happiness increase!

FIVE GEMS BY THREE MASTERS: ROSSANO SPORTIELLO, FRANK TATE, HAL SMITH at the CLEVELAND CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (September 16, 2016)

We must acknowledge the passage of time.  Art Tatum, Johnny Guarneri, Hank Jones have become Ancestors.  Israel Crosby, Milt Hinton, and Oscar Pettiford have moved to another neighborhood.  Sidney Catlett, Dave Tough, and Jo Jones have passed into spirit.

FRANK.

FRANK.

But we cannot mourn those shifts too sorrowfully, because we have Rossano Sportiello, piano; Frank Tate, string bass; Hal Smith, drums to show us how it’s done in 2016 — Old Time Modern, flawlessly.

They did it (perhaps for the first time ever?) at the 2015 Cleveland Classic Jazz Party, for a short spell.  It seemed that by the time I had set up my camera, their set was over.

HAL.

HAL.

This year, on September 16, 2016, I was better prepared . . . and caught the whole glorious effusion.  I was transported, and the audience was rocking alongside me.  You’ll hear immediately that I don’t list the names of the illustrious forbears in vain. This trio has a lightness and grit that I don’t hear very often, and it is good medicine for troubled times and happy ones.  They perform two early-twentieth century pop classics, two blues, with nods to Basie, Charlie Christian, and the boogie-woogie masters, as well as Rossano’s Chopin-into-jazz transformations.  All with style, grace, and enthusiasm beyond compare.  And this is a blissfully natural-sounding group: a fine grand piano (no microphones pushed under its lid); an unamplified string bass; a drum kit of snare drum and hi-hat cymbal, wire brushes to the fore — the old days without anything dusty about them.

ROSSANO.

ROSSANO.

SHOULD I? (from Rhapsody to Romp, which could serve as a title for the set):

SWEET LORRAINE:

SOFT WINDS:

CHOPIN IN JAZZ:

BASIE BLUES / BOOGIE (exalted dance music):

I have it on good authority that this trio is accepting gigs.  Private parties, public concert tours, canonization . . . what you will.  They deserve it, and so do we.

May your happiness increase!

“FINALLY, SOME JAZZ!”: ROSSANO SPORTIELLO, SCOTT ROBINSON, HARRY ALLEN, FRANK TATE, PETE SIERS at the CLEVELAND CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (September 15, 2016)

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Rossano Sportiello is a pianistic Maestro and a great Inspirer — not only a dazzling soloist, but someone who adds new joy to any ensemble.  Here are three glorious examples of what happens when Rossano and his peers get together. These wonderful performances — so informal and playful, so rewarding — took place at the Thursday-night opening jam session at the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party on September 15, 2016.  Rossano’s comrades are Harry Allen, tenor saxophone; Scott Robinson, tenor; Frank Tate, string bass; Pete Siers, drums.

First, Harry, Rossano, Frank, and Pete perform the poignant Rodgers and Hart IT’S EASY TO REMEMBER, introduced by Bing Crosby in the film MISSISSIPPI:

Then, Scott joins them for the Hank Jones line on the harmonies of SWEET SUE — first heard, I think, on a Coleman Hawkins session with Buck Clayton — the composition titled VIGNETTE.  From the pre-song banter, I take my whimsical title:

And finally, “a blues,” but one that turns into an astonishing masterpiece of sustained joy and expertise and drama:

Thank you, Rossano, Scott, Harry, Frank, and Pete.  “Goodness, how delicious!”

May your happiness increase! 

GUILTY, WITH AN EXPLANATION (September 2016)

judges-gavel

I confess that I’ve let some days go by without blogging.  Unthinkable, I know, but I (gently) throw myself on the mercy of the JAZZ LIVES court of readers.

Permit me to explain.  From Thursday, September 15, to Sunday, the 18th, I was entranced by and at the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party.  Consider these — randomly chosen — delights.  Jim Dapogny playing IF I WERE YOU (twice) and some of his winsome original compositions.  Rossano Sportiello, Frank Tate, and Hal Smith swinging like no one’s business.  Rebecca Kilgore singing KEEP A SONG IN YOUR SOUL in the Andy Schumm-Hal Smith tribute to Alex Hill. Andy, on piano, with Paul Patterson and Marty Grosz — once on banjo! — in a hot chamber trio (a highlight being LOUISE).  Wesla Whitfield in wonderfully strong voice.  Dan Block and Scott Robinson romping through HOTTER THAN ‘ELL.  A Basie-styled small band led by Jon Burr, offering (among other pleasures) IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS OF THE MORNING.  A string bass trio — Burr, Tate, and Kerry Lewis — showing that no other instruments need apply.  Harry Allen and Jon-Erik Kellso playing ballads, and Dan Barrett, too.  Tributes to Nat Cole, Harry Warren, Isham Jones, and Bill Evans.  Many videos, too — although they take some time to emerge in public.

I came home late Sunday night and on Monday and Tuesday returned to normal (employed) life as Professor Steinman: John Updike, Tillie Olsen, William Faulkner.

Tomorrow, which is Wednesday, September 21, I get on a plane to New Orleans for Duke Heitger’s Steamboat Stomp.  Obviously I can’t report on delights experienced, but I can say I am looking forward to hearing, talking with, and cheering for the Yerba Buena Stompers, Miss Ida Blue, Banu Gibson, Tim Laughlin, Hal Smith, Kris Tokarski, Andy Schumm, Alex Belhaj, David Boeddinghaus, Ed Wise, Charlie Halloran, James Evans, Steve Pistorius, Orange Kellin, Tom Saunders, Debbie Fagnano, and many others.

So there you have it.  I could sit at home blogging, or I could be on the road, collecting gems, some of which I will be able to share.

My counsel in all this has been the most eminent solicitor, Thomas Langham, who will now offer his closing argument to the jury:

May your happiness increase!