Tag Archives: Complete Morton Project

HAPPINESS IS JUST A THING CALLED JELLY: THE COMPLETE MORTON PROJECT, NOW COMPLETE: ANDREW OLIVER and DAVID HORNIBLOW

Why are these two men so elated?

Andrew (left), piano, and David (right) reeds, otherwise known to a loyal contingent of supporters as the Complete Morton Project, recently announced on Facebook that they have recorded the last of the Jelly Roll Morton compositions they set out to record more than a few months ago.  By my count, they have created 94 videos.  I’ve fallen behind, so this post is an affectionate but tardy attempt to gather up what you and I might have missed.  Eleven of the best!  And for inspired unstuffy commentary on the Morton cornucopia, visit  Andrew’s blog here.

CROC-O-DILE CRADLE, never recorded, existing only in manuscript (found, I believe, by Vince Giordano):

The most excellent WOLVERINE BLUES (not a blues) where David begins with Volly DeFaut’s 1925 clarinet solo:

CREEPY FEELING, an extended meditation from the Library of Congress sessions:

LONDON BLUES, courtesy of Kurt Nauck III

LONDON BLUES, which has a long pedigree:

PONCHARTRAIN, named for the New Orleans lake:

CRAZY CHORDS, which has fragments of 1930 modernism here and there, and David’s interpolation of the “rather dreadful” clarinet solo from the recording:

STOP AND GO, from Morton’s last compositions for big band:

MUSHMOUTH SHUFFLE (I’d love to know the thought or stimulus behind many of Jelly’s titles):

SUPERIOR RAG:

A late frolic, SWINGING THE ELKS, with a particularly exuberant solo by Andrew before David picks up the bass saxophone to solo on this flying march:

SPORTING HOUSE RAG, recorded late, sounds like an early showpiece: here, again, scored for piano and bass saxophone:

May your happiness increase!

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THEIR JELLY ROLL IS SWEET (DAVID HORNIBLOW, ANDREW OLIVER, a/k/a THE COMPLETE MORTON PROJECT)

Here are two versions of Jelly Roll, which may be merged and considered by the imaginative:

Incidentally, this is not just any jelly roll: this is Martha Stewart’s jelly roll. Take note.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then, there’s the Complete Morton Project (David Horniblow, reeds; Andrew Oliver, piano): totally satisfying but without a calorie count.

Here are the latest hot dishes from Andrew and David.

I seem to remember that Mr. Morton named this for a waitress in a  bar, who must have been lovely:

A paean to cross-species nocturnal choreographies:

Finally, the famous one we’ve all been waiting for, in honor of Porter King:

Incidentally, they say it can’t be beat.

May your happiness increase!

THEY KEEP ROLLING ON: DAVID HORNIBLOW and ANDREW OLIVER PLAY MORTON, BEAUTIFULLY

It’s one thing to have a bright idea, another to give that idea tangible shape.  But consistent unflagging creativity is dazzling.  The Complete Morton Project — Andrew Oliver, piano, and David Horniblow, reeds, with occasional doubling and special guests — is a wonderful embodiment of all the principles above.

I have trouble keeping up with their weekly gifts, but here is another sustained offering of pleasure.

DON’T YOU LEAVE ME HERE was recorded in Morton’s last flourish, although I suspect he had had the composition in his repertoire for years.  With its melancholy title, it’s always a pleasing shock to hear it treated in this jauntily ambling fashion:

and a Morton line that used to be played more often — famous versions with Louis, Bechet, Red, Johnny Dodds — WILD MAN BLUES, with a delicious conversation-in-breaks created by Andrew and David:

GAN JAM (or GANJAM) was never recorded by Jelly, but was envisioned as an orchestral composition for a big band.  James Dapogny reimgined it as it might have been, and here the CMP envisions it as a duet — full of what might have been called “Oriental” touches but to our ears might simply be extended harmonies, quite fascinating.  I’d bet that someone hearing this for the first time would not think Morton its composer.  You can read Andrew’s observations on both tune and performance here:

Finally, a title that would not apply to what Andrew and David have been giving us so generously, THAT’LL NEVER DO (did Morton say that to one of his musicians at a rehearsal or run-through?).

I see a chorus line in my mind, high-kicking:

May your happiness increase!

“STOMP IT RIGHT NOW!”: DAVID HORNIBLOW, ANDREW OLIVER, MICHAEL McQUAID, NICHOLAS BALL PLAY JELLY ROLL MORTON

The Complete Morton Project showers us with gifts musical and even zoological, once again.

I’M LOOKING FOR A LITTLE BLUEBIRD, which has the flavor of a late-Twenties pop song, which is a compliment:

An extraordinary romp through BLACK BOTTOM STOMP:

I have no idea who MISSISSIPPI MILDRED was, if she existed at all, and what Morton’s conception about the women’s names that became part of song titles, aside from ‘NITA and MABEL, sweet and fussy, respectively:

And now, properly credited, “Nicholas D Ball – Drums and goat / Michael McQuaid – Reeds, cornet, and beastliness / David Horniblow – Bass sax and caprine outbursts / Andrew Oliver – Piano, cornet, and vocables, show us “It’s beastly hot in here!”

And here is Andrew’s blogpost on these four selections.  Alas, no more information seems to have surfaced on Lew LeMarr, the wild laugher on HYENA STOMP and the goat on this:

May your happiness increase!

IT MUST BE JELLY: ANDREW OLIVER and DAVID HORNIBLOW PLAY MORTON

The COMPLETE MORTON PROJECT keeps on rolling along, which is lovely.  We know there isn’t an infinite supply of Morton compositions — which makes me a little nervous, thinking of the end — but their steady progress, song by song, is more than uplifting.

And since I am always a little behind the best runners, here are four more.  IF YOU KNEW comes from the late sessions for the General label (“Tavern Tunes” — for the jukebox market in places where people drank alcohol?) but my thought is that if you knew how good this music was, and you surely do, you would spread the word:

and the beautifully tender love song, SWEET SUBSTITUTE, here with equal time given to the yearning verse.

I think I first heard Henry “Red” Allen’s 1965 version — he had been on the original session — and then other heroes, Rebecca Kilgore and Marty Grosz, did it also.  But this version is just as heartfelt:

and this week’s basket of Jelly!

Beginning with a wild romp that is either near to or right on top of FAREWELL BLUES, Jelly’s BURNIN’ THE ICEBERG, a title that makes me uncomfortable in the face of global warming / climate change / welcome, O Doom / whatever you’d like to call it:

and finally, the spectacularly evocative WININ’ BOY BLUES, which has as many interpretations attached to it as you can imagine.  Looking around online for the record label below, I found someone reproducing the lyrics as “whining boy.”  For goodness’ sake.  Morton never whined, nor does his music.

Perhaps the truth lies in between the Library of Congress lyrics and the idea of someone bringing wine to resuscitate hard-working women:

Yes, it MUST be Jelly when Andrew Oliver and David Horniblow get together, no matter which side of the room the piano nestles, although they can and do play many more beautiful songs.  Wonderfully.

P.S.  And. . . . have you heard the Vitality Five’s latest e-78, which pairs LAND OF COTTON BLUES and THAT’S NO BARGAIN?  Check it out (as they used to say on the Forty-Second Street of my adolescence — New Yorkers will get the reference — here.

May your happiness increase!

“THIS NEW ART FORM”: ANDREW OLIVER and DAVID HORNIBLOW TALK AND PLAY JELLY ROLL MORTON

What a nice surprise — a mini-documentary featuring the two Onlie Begetters of the Complete Morton Project, Andrew Oliver, piano; David Horniblow, reeds:

and last week’s treats (I’m always lagging behind): MISTER JOE, named for Joe Oliver:

and JERSEY JOE, which I have speculated — with no particular evidence — might be in tribute to the boxer Jersey Joe Walcott, although it could have been someone who tipped Morton heavily on a New Jersey gig.  Another mystery:

We were taught as children that sharing was what good people do, not just a social obligation.  So I salute Andrew and David, who have so much to share and have done so expertly and generously.  We love them no matter which side of the room the piano is on.  Great couch pillows, too: stylish in all things.

May your happiness increase!

“I’LL HAVE SIX OF YOUR BEST MORTONS, PLEASE!”: DAVID HORNIBLOW and ANDREW OLIVER PLAY JELLY ROLL

I’ve fallen behind in my Morton studies, but Professors Oliver (piano) and Horniblow (reeds) of the Complete Morton Project are forgiving.  So here’s a hot half-dozen.

GEORGIA SWING (in a performance that has some of the dash of the 1928 WEATHER BIRD to it):

GET THE BUCKET (with compact glee-club vocals):

The poignant IF SOMEONE WOULD ONLY LOVE ME:

Was Mabel FUSSY or simply sensitive?  The label calls her “Meticulosa,” which sounds better.  We can’t know, but hear this:

Wow, here’s PRETTY LIL (who had a better press agent than Mabel, I guess):

Finally, the floral-sounding PRIMROSE STOMP:

And leave us not forget the Vitality Five’s July e-78:

I have a small collection of 78s, but I applaud e-78s as well: they don’t break and take up less space.  And when one has to move, there’s none of that lower back pain.  Highly recommended.

May your happiness increase!