Tag Archives: friends

SEVENTY YEARS AGO, EVERYONE WAS VERY YOUNG: BOB WILBER, DICK WELLSTOOD, WILDCATS AND FRIENDS

Let’s begin with some good sounds:

And some explanation, from New York City, 1947:

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This post (like so many others) is the result of others’ kindness: in this case, the still-swinging clarinetist Bob Sparkman, who at 88, is “still playing and listening.” Some months ago, Bob sent me this note: Thought maybe you’d be interested in four old photos of Bob Wilber and Dick Wellstood recently sent to me by a local fan, taken, probably, in 1945 or 46, at a place called The Hanger, in either Springfield or Westfield, Mass.

I certainly was interested, but this post had to wait until I had a functioning scanner: what better way to inaugurate it than with rare jazz photographs I could share with you?

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Dick Wellstood for sure.

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More sounds, from February 1947:

and it’s only fitting to conclude the musical segment with a DREAM:

If you can identify any of the musicians in the photographs, I will be happy to add the information.  If your contribution to the post is twofold: one, to listen to the recordings and smile; two, to be thankful for Bob Wilber and all he has given us, those two things will more than suffice.  Bob and his beloved wife, Pug Horton, are still trucking along in their home in England, and we salute them.

A postscript, or THIS JUST IN.  Chris Tyle, indefatigable and many-talented, sent me cleared-up versions of the four photographs above — out of pure generosity.  Here they are.

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May your happiness increase!

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JAMES, CHARLES, SALVATORE: FROM THE McCONVILLE ARCHIVES (Part Nine)

Say that my glory was I had such friends,” writes W.B. Yeats.  If we’d never heard a note of Leo McConville’s playing, never seen him in the Walt Roemer and his Capitolians short film . . . we would know him as a man admired and respected by the finest creators in his field.

See for yourself.

JAMES MELTON is hardly a Jack Purvis man of mystery, but he had more than a handful of careers — as the “hot” alto player in Francis Craig’s 1926 band, as a radio personality beginning in the next year, then an opera star.  Melton was a lyric tenor with a light, high voice — and all the formal hallmarks of that style: the exact enunciation, the rolled R — a style that became less popular when the crooners of the late Twenties came to prominence.

Melton is also known, oddly, to jazz fans, as having led a 1929 session of sacred songs that featured Benny Goodman on clarinet and alto, even though a measure of his jazz fame might be that my edition of Brian Rust’s discography has a Melton entry in the index that lacks a page number.  Did Leo meet him on the radio in the late Twenties?

CHARLES MARGULIS has much more presence to jazz listeners for his trumpet work with Jean Goldkette and with Paul Whiteman — but he continued on as an impressive soloist into the Sixties, and he can be heard on recordings with pop artists (Eartha Kitt, Harry Belafonte) as well as his own trumpet showcases.  John Chilton notes that Margulis had a chicken farm in the Thirties: I imagine Charles and Leo discussing the intricacies of the best feed, which breeds gave the most reliable output, and so on.  But here he is, completely urbane:

And the prize, as far as I am concerned — EDDIE LANG (born SALVATORE MASSARO) — one of the most distinctive instrumental voices of his era, in ensemble or solo.

The career that Lang might have had if he had not died on the operating table in 1933 is hinted at in these two film appearances.  The first finds him in the BIG BROADCAST with Bing Crosby, performing DINAH (off-screen) and PLEASE (very much a part of the scene).  And from the less-known A REGULAR TROUPER, he accompanies Ruth Etting on WITHOUT THAT MAN!

Although Lang would not be alive today, I can imagine him accompanying a pop or jazz singer on the ED SULLIVAN SHOW or the HOLLYWOOD PALACE.

More to come . . . !

Two postscripts about Charles Margulis: the Bixography Forum (a treasure-house of information, occasionally a hotbed of controversy) offers a 1962 conversation with the trumpeter:

http://bixography.com/MargulisHolbrook/A%20Conversation%20With%20Charles%20Margulis.html

And just to show that Margulis had great fame into the second half of the last century, here is a picture of one of his long-playing recordings:

FRIENDS OF LEO: FROM THE McCONVILLE ARCHIVES (Part Four)

Because trumpeter Leo McConville was a valued member of top radio orchestras, he had friends who came from that world as well as jazz musicians.  Here are four examples — and for those who might suffer momentary hot-music withdrawal pangs, two band pictures and one familiar face at the end of this post. 

Here are three child stars who appeared on the same program — hosted by Milton Cross, and called COAST-TO-COAST ON A BUS, THE CHILDREN’S HOUR, and THE WHITE RABBIT LINE (which “jumps anywhere, anytime!”).  Singer Audrey Egan is the least known of the three, and I don’t know whether she continued in show business as an adult:

Jackie Kelk (1923-2002) appeared with Audrey on the same radio program, but he is much more famous because he played “Jimmy Olsen” for seven years on the radio version of SUPERMAN before moving into television:

I had a vague recognition of Kelk, but a clearer awareness of “Walter C. Tetley,” also known without the C.  He is the most famous of the three, playing “Leroy” on the radio series THE GREAT GILDERSLEEVE — someone who retained his childlike voice into adulthood (he can be heard on recordings by Stan Freberg):

The attractive Olga “Gypsy” Markoff (born 1917) revealed herself after a few minutes of online searching — as an accordionist who played the classics for FDR and other heads of state:

For the sake of comparison, here is the Getty Images photograph of the same woman:

Finally (as promised) here are two bands.  I know nothing of the first, except that the drummer’s set has initials — his or the leader’s? — and that the set itself is a beauty:

And Leo himself is visible in the second photograph, although I don’t recognize his colleagues:

And a familiar face and colleague:

Three child stars, one lovely accordionist, two bands, one hot cornetist — the Archives continue to surprise!