Tag Archives: Henri Lemaire

BEHIND THE SCENES: BENT PERSSON, THOMAS WINTELER, GRAHAM HUGHES, MORTEN GUNNAR LARSEN, MALCOLM SKED, HENRI LEMAIRE, NICK BALL (Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, Nov. 8, 2014)

“How do they do it?” is the question, uttered or thought, that we all ask when we hear our admired jazz musicians sing or play as part of an ensemble.  “How do they know where to go?  Even when they have music in front of them, how are there no collisions?”

WB 2014 photo for rehearsal

The answers are deep and not easy to put into words.  Professionalism is part of it, a common language, experience with hours of practice (solo and with others), the great gift to improvise.  It’s deeply intuitive, and the only analogy for non-musicians might be, “How do we know what to say — if, in fact, we do — when among people we don’t know?  How do we know how to be part of a conversation, how to follow the general threads of thought and feeling?”

One of the great pleasures of what is now called the Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party (colloquially known to its friends as “Whitley Bay”) is that, because the music can be complicated, and the musicians don’t all play with one another regularly, there are hours of open rehearsals.  People like myself can sit in the Village Hotel ballroom and watch and listen for hours.  I do it with my camera, because once in a great while a band catches fire are plays gloriously, as if the musicians were in a back room in a Chicago nightspot.

Late last year, after the 2014 Party was over, I’d sent one of the rehearsal videos to trumpeter Bent Persson — it was a Bechet tribute with Thomas Winteler on clarinet and soprano saxophone, Graham Hughes, trombone; Morten Gunnar Larsen, piano; Henri Lemaire, guitar and banjo; Malcolm Sked, brass and string bass; Nick Ball, drums — and asked him if he thought it could be shared with the public.  The song was ACHIN’ HEARTED BLUES, which contains a labyrinth of instrumental breaks.  This year, Bent said I could go ahead and post it.

It is, of course, a rehearsal.  So there are long pauses.  Questions are asked. Some of this will be curious to non-musicians.  But it is a wonderful opportunity, I think, to see how — without words, magically — a performance comes together. And the rocking complete version of ACHIN’ HEARTED BLUES is, for me, magical:

Words would not be terribly useful to explain what happens here — part knowledge, part empathy, part wizardry.  But I see and hear something new each time I revisit the video.

In case you need more encouragement to get yourself to this year’s Party — which starts November 5 and ends November 8 or perhaps in the early hours of the 9th — here is a list of the musicians who will be there.  Astounding, in short. I’ve left my comfortable New York nest every year since 2009 to be there, and the rewards are huge.

May your happiness increase!

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LO AND BEHOLD! — “THE FAT BABIES” at WHITLEY BAY (Nov. 9, 2014)

“Lo and behold!” is, by now, an archaic expression by which one refers to something surprising that has happened.  In this case, the surprises are all good ones.  (The record below belongs to William Berndt, who also took the photo.)

LO AND BEHOLD

 

When Andy Schumm (multi-instrumentalist, arranger, composer, bandleader) came to the 2014 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, he brought arrangements with him for a ten-piece band — which would have been a characteristic instrumentation in the late Twenties and early Thirties: three brass, three reeds, four rhythm.  At home, Andy and string bassist Beau Sample pilot a hot band called THE FAT BABIES (they’ve made two delightful CDs for the Delmark label and they have a regular gig in Chicago) . . . but the charts Andy brought held no terrors for the international luminaries at Whitley Bay.  In addition to Andy, there’s Menno Daams, cornet; Alistair Allan, trombone; Jean-Francois Bonnel, Lars Frank, Claus Jacobi, reeds; David Boeddinghaus, piano; Henri Lemaire, banjo; Malcolm Sked, bass and sousaphone; Josh Duffee, drums.  They performed — nobly — a lengthy set of hot music, dance music, an Oriental fox-trot . . . full of surprises, including a new Schumm composition in the best style and many new arrangements of venerable songs.  Herewith!

FIVE FOOT TWO, EYES OF BLUE:

BABY (in the Guy Lombardo arrangement, with heat):

SHE REMINDS ME OF YOU (a song associated with Bing):

I WANT YOU, JUST MYSELF (homage to King Oliver with new solos):

CHINA GIRL (the aforementioned “Oriental fox-trot” with a wonderful outchorus):

I WANT TO GO HOME (a Joe Sanders arrangement):

LO AND BEHOLD! (from 1932):

SMILE WHEN THE RAINDROPS FALL (for Stan and Ollie, with a group vocal):

WHEN SHE CAME TO ME (comp. Schumm; manner, Goldkette):

LIVIN’ IN THE SUNLIGHT, LOVIN’ IN THE MOONLIGHT:

And if you’d like to hear more music like this, the Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party is taking place in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, November 5-8, 2015.

A postscript.  I take public transportation to get in and out of New York City, preferring that to the stress of finding parking for my car.  So on the bus and on the commuter railroad, everyone has earbuds firmly mounted.  Often I can hear what they are listening to through the earbuds, which means that audiologists will never want for work — but I digress.  Whether or not you can make it to Whitley Bay, I would like all my readers who commute to save some of these videos for their trek to and from work.  It would please me immensely to think of people on the bus or train happily grooving to BABY or LO AND BEHOLD!  Do what you can, please, to help make my hot jazz / hot dance fantasy a reality.

May your happiness increase!

RICO and his RUG-CUTTERS! (WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY, Nov. 8, 2014)

One of the many highlights of the 2014 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party was a “Duke’s Men” set led by trumpeter / vocalist Rico Tomasso — where he beautifully evoked the recordings made by small Ellington units in the Thirties.

We heard music from the Jazzopators (Barney Bigard), the Fifty-Second Street Stompers (Rex Stewart), the Rug-Cutters (Cootie Williams), as well as compositions associated with Johnny Hodges, Sonny Greer, Juan Tizol.

One of the first things I did when I came back from Whitley Bay was to post Rico’s AIN’T THE GRAVY GOOD? — which has received some of the attention it deserves.  But a number of people, both musicians and fans, have asked, “Is there any more from Rico’s small-band Ellington set?” and I am happy to oblige here by presenting the entire set as it happened.

The band Rico assembled is David Boeddinghaus, piano; Malcolm Sked, bass; Henri Lemaire, guitar; Richard Pite, drums; Alistair Allan, trombone; Matthias Seuffert, Claus Jacobi, reeds.

KRUM ELBOW BLUES and DROP ME OFF IN HARLEM:

(For more about “Krum Elbow,” although the evidence is complex, click here.)

JEEP’S BLUES:

BIG HOUSE BLUES:

DRUMMER’S DELIGHT:

PRELUDE TO A KISS:

CARAVAN:

AIN’T THE GRAVY GOOD?:

FROLIC SAM:

The gravy is good!  I know there will be more delicious music this coming November 6-8 at the Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party.  (The new name is an appropriate tribute to its beloved founder: the music and the guiding principles remain unchanged so, and that’s a good thing.)

May your happiness increase!

EASY DOES IT: MATTHIAS SEUFFERT, ENRICO TOMASSO, MARTIN LITTON, HENRI LEMAIRE, MALCOLM SKED, RICHARD PITE at WHITLEY BAY (Nov. 9, 2014)

Jake Hanna said — more than once — “When you get too far from Basie, you’re just kidding yourself.”

Reedman Matthias Seuffert knows this well, and put his knowledge into action at the 2014 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, with a delightful set of Basie music. Matthias diverted us with his tenor saxophone and clarinet; Enrico Tomasso played trumpet; the rhythm section, essential, was Martin Litton, piano; Henri Lemaire, rhythm guitar; Malcolm Sked, string bass; Richard Pite, drums.

EASY DOES IT:

Eddie Durham’s TOPSY:

THESE FOOLISH THINGS:

COUNTLESS BLUES, in honor of the 1938 Kansas City Six:

BLUE LESTER:

SHOE SHINE BOY:

BLUE AND SENTIMENTAL, for Herschel:

and moving into the Fifties, FLIGHT OF THE FOO BIRDS (don’t let all that manuscript paper seem intimidating):

“Easy does it” isn’t just a bumper sticker or a catchphrase: it’s a way of life both inside and outside jazz.  What would happen if we tried to live the Basie way? Worth considering.

And on a more pragmatic note, each of the musicians seen in the videos will be playing at the 2015 Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party — November 6-8.  I’ve already started to look into airplane tickets and fares . . . a sign of great moral commitment to this Party.  If you’ve never been there, and you can get there, and you don’t . . . why, you’re just kidding yourself.  Where have I heard those words before?

May your happiness increase!

THE LATE MISTER MORTON: BENT PERSSON, MORTEN GUNNAR LARSEN, THOMAS WINTELER, JEAN-FRANCOIS BONNEL, GRAHAM HUGHES, JACOB ULLBERGER, HENRI LEMAIRE, NICK BALL at the 2014 WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (November 7, 2014)

Cornetist / trumpeter / scholar Bent Persson loves Jelly Roll Morton.  Here, he assembled a cohesive little band for a set at the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party (on November 7, 2014)  that took as its text Morton’s last recordings, from 1940 and 1941.  Bent’s colleagues are Nick Ball, drums; Henri Lemaire, string bass; Jacob Ullberger, guitar; Morten Gunnar Larsen, piano; Thomas Winteler, Jean-Francois Bonnel, reeds; Graham Hughes.

In the full-band titles, most of which featured Henry “Red” Allen, one of Bent’s (and my) heroes, one hears an approach different from the Victor Red Hot Peppers — sometimes as if Morton was adapting conventions of Swing Era arranging for his own purposes, with great effectiveness.

Here are five selections, each rewarding and full of small surprises.

MY HOME IS IN A SOUTHERN TOWN, which rollicks along:

WININ’ BOY BLUES, without a vocal but with double-time passages:

KING PORTER STOMP in its original form as a piano solo, which — after decades of hearing it scored for brass and reeds — sounds novel, almost startling.  Talk about “orchestral piano”!

FROG-I-MORE RAG, as imagined for the trio of Thomas, Morten, and a very happy Nick:

SWEET SUBSTITUTE, for full band, echoing the powerful General recording:

I’ll be at the 2015 Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party.  These videos, and others I’ve posted, should answer the question “Why?” neatly.  At least they do for me.

May your happiness increase!

“TWO DEUCES”: ENRICO TOMASSO, BENT PERSSON, JEAN-FRANCOIS BONNEL, CLAUS JACOBI, MAURO PORRO, ALISTAIR ALLAN, DAVID BOEDDINGHAUS, MARTIN WHEATLEY, HENRI LEMAIRE, NICK BALL at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (Nov. 9, 2014)

TWO DEUCES

I thought, “What could I give the JAZZ LIVES audience for Christmas 2014?”

I am not in the habit of giving holiday presents, but I thought this would do the trick: a wonderfully sustained six-minute exploration of the 1928 classic TWO DEUCES (summoning up Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines in their youth) by some of Gabriel’s boys: Enrico Tomasso and Bent Persson, trumpets; Jean-Francois Bonnel, Mauro Porro (grinning), Claus Jacobi, reeds; Alistair Allan, trombone; David Boeddinghaus (brilliantly Hinesian), piano; Martin Wheatley, banjo / guitar; Henri Lemaire, string bass; Nick Ball, drums.  Recorded on November 9, 2014, at the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party:

This music embodies joy for all.  It won’t be stale on December 26.  And if you would allow me to send the Official JAZZ LIVES Holiday Message, it would be just six words and a few punctuation marks:

Be kind.

Spread joy.

Study Louis.

May your happiness increase!

THE MANY LIVES OF SIDNEY BECHET: THOMAS WINTELER, BENT PERSSON, GRAHAM HUGHES, MORTEN GUNNAR LARSEN, HENRI LEMAIRE, MALCOLM SKED, NICK BALL at WHITLEY BAY (Nov. 8, 2014)

The very great Sidney Bechet was an assertive soloist early in the history of jazz, a swaggering melodic improviser who pointed the way for many players. Sometimes his legacy gets compressed into SUMMERTIME (which is an offering in the presentation below) but his legacy was much more expansive than one operatic performance.

BECHET

Here, at the 2014 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, reed virtuoso Thomas Winteler and friends Bent Persson, trumpet and vocal; Graham Hughes, trombone; Morten Gunnar Larsen, piano; Henri Lemaire, banjo / guitar; Malcolm Sked, bass; Nick Ball, drums, offer a wide-ranging portrait of Monsieur Bechet from the very early Twenties to the mid-Forties, with familiar songs taking a back seat to less-played ones, including a pair of unrecorded Bechet originals.

OH, DADDY:

SHREVEPORT BLUES:

Forward more than fifteen years, to his version of Victor Herbert’s lovely INDIAN SUMMER:

From the Decca date with Louis (here Bent sings the blues), 2:19 BLUES:

OLD FASHIONED LOVE:

SUMMERTIME:

Two Bechet originals, never recorded — SWEET LOUISIANA / I’LL BE PROUD OF YOU:

GEORGIA CABIN:

A memory of the 1945 Blue Note date with Bunk Johnson, PORTO RICO:

This happens only at the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, now called the Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party in honor of its beloved founder, and it will happen again on November 5-8, 2015.

May your happiness increase!