Tag Archives: Ida Melrose Shoufler

HOT JAZZ, HIGH ALTITUDES: KRIS TOKARSKI, TIM LAUGHLIN, ANDY SCHUMM, HAL SMITH at the EVERGREEN JAZZ FESTIVAL (July 30, 2016)

Harold Ross, who edited THE NEW YORKER for twenty-five years, said, “Talent doesn’t care where it resides.”  And although Evergreen, Colorado is 7,220 feet above sea level, the music I’ve heard at the Evergreen Jazz Festival in 2014 and 2016 has never been short of breath.  Or, for that matter, passion, swing, or inspiration.  I’m going there again this July 2018.

As evidence, I present seven informal hot performances by Kris  Tokarski, piano; Tim Laughlin, clarinet; Andy Schumm, cornet; Hal Smith, drums, from a 2016 Saturday-afternoon session in a local restaurant.

Looking ahead to the weekend, SUNDAY:

IDA, which we dedicate happily to Ida Melrose Shoufler, back to herself:

The quartet assembles for Hines’ MY MONDAY DATE:

IF I COULD BE WITH YOU ONE HOUR TONIGHT.  Did someone whisper “Muggsy Spanier”?

It’s shocking.  She’s NOBODY’S SWEETHEART NOW:

Tim’s featured on a lovely A NIGHTINGALE SANG IN BERKELEY SQUARE:

And to close, Artie Matthews’ WEARY BLUES:

For more information about this month’s fiesta, click here.  The Festival is happening on July 27-29, with Dorothy Bradford Vernon’s barn dance featuring the Carl Sonny Leyland trio in Longmont, Colorado, on the 26th.

May your happiness increase!

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PASS THE JUG, PLEASE, or IF YOU DON’T KNOW FRANK MELROSE, YOU SHOULD

frank-melrose

One of the great tragedies in the music we love is the premature and violent death of Frank Melrose — really a brutal murder of a beloved father and husband and a great artist. . . . “Franklyn Taft Melrose (November 26, 1907 – September 1, 1941)” says it all.

But for three minutes or so, you and I can choose to celebrate as well as mourn. Thanks to “Atticus Jazz” on YouTube, the deft and generous Emrah Erken, you may hear a beautiful copy of PASS THE JUG, with Melrose on piano (billed as “Kansas City Frank”) and Tommy Taylor on drums — recorded in Chicago on March 8, 1929.

That rocks!

This one’s for my dear Aunt Ida Melrose Shoufler, who understands.  And it is in memory of Frances Melrose, Frank’s wife and Ida’s mother . . . seen below at the  piano, because she shouldn’t be left out, either.

frances-melrose-at-the-piano

May your happiness increase!

TERRY BLAINE AND MARK SHANE MAKE BEAUTIFUL MUSIC: MAY 8, 2015 (Part One)

So sweet when they stir it up.

Deep comfort.

Terry Blaine and Mark Shane are endearing musicians and very dear people, and I was thrilled to be able to attend and record their informal concert at the Croton Free Library in Croton-on-Hudson on May 8.  They’ve been working together for nearly thirty years, which shows in their genial swing and deep intuitive feeling for the music.

Terry Blaine is one of the finest singers you haven’t heard enough about.  Her speaking voice alone is full of light and shade, girlish enthusiasm and real depths; her singing voice is a watercolor landscape in itself, wistful, hinting at shadings that she does not overemphasize.  When I’ve heard her sing a familiar song I am always thrilled to hear its inner self revealed at last.  Tenderness and sweet swing pedal along side by side in her expressive gentle art.  She takes as her model the extraordinary Ethel Waters, but she is her own woman, and we are so glad of that.

Mark Shane is the frolicking brook to Terry’s serene voice, the dancing waters and rippling sounds, the Jess Stacy to her Helen Ward.  As we listen, we hear them both, complementing each other playfully but never demanding our attention forcefully.

Here is what I wrote about Terry and Mark and their newest CD, SWINGTIME DUET: MY BLUE HEAVEN, in 2014.

But now it’s 2015, and I can share selections from this magic, quiet, affecting evening with you.  Listen to Terry’s caressing voice, to Mark’s just-right accompaniment and solo.  Admire the easy way they make two old songs sound new and one that might be new to you sound comforting, wise, and true.  Float on their sweet tempos — they both know everything one would want to know about the Blessed Land of Medium Tempo.  If you’re not smiling because of this music, I don’t know what to say to you.  I certainly am.

HONEYSUCKLE ROSE (so easy and sweet!):

BREAD AND GRAVY (Hoagy for Ethel):

MY MELANCHOLY BABY (which has passed from being over-requested to rare and obscure, which is a pity, since it’s such a lovely song):

There will be more songs from this concert, I promise you.  But one doesn’t gobble down the finest cuisine, nay nay.

This post is specifically for my dear Aunt Ida Melrose Shoufler, who loves Mark and Terry as I do.

May your happiness increase!

“FINE, WONDERFUL, PERFECT!”: MORE FROM CONNIE and TIM at SAN DIEGO (November 2014)

Eddie Condon told the story of watching Fats Waller get a band together for the MINOR DRAG / HARLEM FUSS session, and that Fats’ response to an idea that pleased him was “Fine, wonderful, perfect!”  (although each word may have had its own exclamation point).

FWP might never become my new acronym for sheer bliss, but it will do for the music that Connie Jones and Tim Laughlin created at the 2014 San Diego Jazz Fest.  I posted two sublime performances a day or two ago, and bowing to popular demand (my own and others’) here are a few more.  Rich and rare!

These are the two final performances Tim’s New Orleans All Stars created for us on their closing set of November 30, 2014 (the NOAS were Tim, clarinet; Connie, cornet; Doug Finke, trombone; Chris Dawson, piano; Katie Cavera, guitar; Marty Eggers, string bass; Hal Smith, drums).

An easy but soaring IDA (for Auntie):

And something for the Swing Ironists, CALIFORNIA HERE I COME:

Wondrous.

May your happiness increase!

UNABRIDGED and UPLIFTING: CARL SONNY LEYLAND and RAY SKJELBRED at MONTEREY (March 19, 2014)

There are occasions when we have two pianos on stage, and two pianists. Perhaps it’s not so unusual these days. But I submit to you that the pairing of Carl Sonny Leyland (on the right side of your screen) and Ray Skjelbred (left) is remarkable for its wit, depth, and playful inventiveness.  It happened on March 9, 2014, at the Jazz Bash at the Bay in Monterey, California, and I present the results here now in all their splendor.  Unabridged, unexpurgated, unedited, and full of life. I apologize that my camera’s wide-angle lens wasn’t sufficiently ample to keep both Masters in the shot, but the sound is I hope compensation for the visual limitations.  (I was seated in the first row and kept swiveling my head back and forth, so my camera followed suit.)

I think it was an absolute honor to be there, and that this is unrivaled music.

NOBODY’S SWEETHEART NOW:

WININ’ BOY BLUES:

FAN IT / OH, BABY!:

HOW LONG BLUES:

CHINA BOY:

BUDDY BOLDEN’S BLUES:

OUR MONDAY DATE:

SUGAR:

BLUES MY NAUGHTY SWEETIE GIVES TO ME:

SPECIAL DELIVERY BLUES:

I WOULD DO ANYTHING FOR YOU:

Both of these great musicians — strong-minded individualists — reveled in this opportunity to create something larger than themselves, something warmly alive and unforgettable. To echo Carl’s words after the end of NOBODY’S SWEETHEART, “Yeah. Fun.”

May your happiness increase!

HAL SMITH HONORS “MISTER CHACE”

The splendid jazz drummer and jazz scholar Hal Smith and I share certain serious devotions.  One is to the pianist Frank Melrose and his daughter Ida; another is to the clarinetist and brave explorer Frank Chace.

Hal has emerged with yet a third talent to share (generously) with us: he has created a beautiful and lively video tribute to Mister Chace, with a glorious soundtrack of SORRY — played by Marty Grosz and his Honoris Causa Jazz Band from the Riverside recording called HOORAY FOR BIX — as well as a panorama of rare, never-before-seen, highly evocative photographs that open the door to understanding Frank Chace a little wider.

Thank you, Hal!  Frank would be amused, perplexed, and I think pleased by your creative act of love.  Ultimately, he would be delighted that someone who understood the music so well — and played it with equal grace — had taken the time to honor him:

Hal and Frank can be heard together on two rewarding and illuminating CD sets on the Jazzology label — one with Butch Thompson, John Otto, and Charlie DeVore; the other with Tom Pletcher and Tom Bartlett, among others.  Winning music indeed.

May your happiness increase!

WAILING SOULFULLY IN SAN DIEGO: RAY SKJELBRED AND HIS CUBS PLAY FRANK MELROSE

I had a wonderful time at the 34th annual San Diego Jazz Fest, held over Thanksgiving weekend 2013. Thanks must go to the diligent and generous Paul Daspit and his Pals, including the heroic Jim McNaughton and Myrna Beach Goodwin, who laid out a hearty spread for us.  Incidentally, the SDJF is ON for 2014: click here!  (The 2014 schedule isn’t posted yet, but I know that Andy Schumm and Josh Duffee will be joining the West Coast luminaries for some hot music.)

Here’s some auditory proof of the 2013 delights — one of the best small bands ever, pianist Ray Skjelbred and his Cubs . . . featuring Kim Cusack, clarinet / vocal; Clint Baker, string bass; Katie Cavera, guitar / vocal; Mike Daugherty, drums.

They played two delectable sets full of Chicago rhythm, something you don’t always hear these days in traditional circles — swing before Swing, hot without self-consciousness about it.

I offer one performance only (I want people to savor this!), WAILING BLUES, written by that vanished paragon of music, “Kansas City” Frank Melrose, whose music — performance and composition — always takes surprising turns, whether gutty or tender or both.

We miss him, and I am honored to have his surviving child, Ida Melrose Shoufler, as a devoted reader of JAZZ LIVES . . . so a little pre-Christmas present of her father’s particularly flavorful WAILING BLUES:

Now, that music exemplifies “tonation and phrasing.”  It gets in the gutter because from there you can really see the stars.

After this performance, Ray said, thoughtfully, “There was something dynamic and strange about everything that Frank Melrose did, which is very appealing to me.”

Frank’s physical self left the planet a long time ago in a death that has the frightening impact of Greek myth, but his spirit — whimsical, intense, curious, heartfelt — is with us today, embodied by these players and those who love him.

I hope you never have to wail, but if the spirit moves you in that direction, may this music guide and shelter you.

May your happiness increase!