Tag Archives: Jason Vanderford

“BAKER, RILEY (tuba);”

I celebrate the public performance and video debut of Riley Baker. You’ve seen and heard (and I trust admired) him on drums, but this is his first appearance in public with a band while he is so allied to metal tubing.

This took place a few days ago — May 30, 2014 — at Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park, where Riley’s father (that fellow Clint) put down the tuba so that Riley could join in. The other members of the All Stars are Leon Oakley, cornet; Jim Klippert, trombone; Robert Young, soprano and alto saxophone; Jason Vanderford, guitar; Bill Reinhart, banjo; J Hansen, drums.

BOURBON STREET PARADE:

MECCA FLAT BLUES:

Except for one chorus on BOURBON STREET PARADE, you can’t see a great deal of Riley’s face, but you can hear and feel him.  His tone is nice and full; he’s playing the right notes; his time is good.

And don’t rely on me: look at Jason’s face on MECCA and look at Leon’s enthusiastic “Welcome to the brotherhood!” grin and gesture at the end of that same tune.

Welcome, young Mister Baker!  And for the detail-obsessed, Riley and twin sister Ramona (a brilliant star in her own orbits) were born on November 28, 2000.  Not yet fourteen.  Hooray for the youngbloods!

May your happiness increase!

THE SWING WE HEARD LAST SUMMER (Part Two): CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS SWING BAND at EPIC SWING (July 13, 2013)

Remembering the past is a good thing, especially when the evidence is so rewarding and swings so well.  Here are some more performances from the evening of merriment and hot music performed by Clint Baker and his New Orleans Swing Band at Epic Swing, San Mateo, California, July 13, 2013.  (The first assortment can be viewed here.)

The band sounds wonderful and I am especially enamored of the Hopperesque lighting afforded everyone onstage.

The participants?  Clint, trumpet, reeds, vocal; Robert Young, reeds, vocal; Ray Skjelbred, piano; Jason Vanderford, guitar / banjo; Tom Wilson, string bass; Jeff Hamilton, drums.

IF I COULD BE WITH YOU ONE HOUR TONIGHT:

THE GIRLS GO CRAZY:

HONEYSUCKLE ROSE:

ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY (sung affirmatively by Clint):

IN THE SHADE OF THE OLD APPLE TREE (vocal Jason):

THE SECOND LINE:

SHAKE THAT THING:

LADY BE GOOD:

More to come! Clint and friends will be playing the Wednesday Night Hop in Mountain View, on January 8, 2014 — a very good way to welcome the New Year in.  Details here.  (And on the 15th, Emily Asher’s Garden Party will take the stand!)

May your happiness increase!

THE SWING WE HEARD LAST SUMMER (Part One): CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS SWING BAND at EPIC SWING (July 13, 2013)

Remembering the past is a good thing, especially when the evidence is so rewarding and swings so well.  Here are some performances from the evening of merriment and hot music performed by Clint Baker and his New Orleans Swing Band at Epic Swing, San Mateo, California, July 13, 2013.

The band sounds wonderful and I am especially enamored of the Hopperesque lighting afforded everyone onstage.

The participants?  Clint, trumpet, reeds, vocal; Robert Young, reeds, vocal; Ray Skjelbred, piano; Jason Vanderford, guitar / banjo; Tom Wilson, string bass; Jeff Hamilton, drums.

CRAZY RHYTHM (with an astonishing extended Skjelbred interlude):

COQUETTE:

PUT ON YOUR OLD GREY BONNET:

SARATOGA SWING:

SOME OF THESE DAYS:

EPIC SWING:

ROYAL GARDEN BLUES:

SWEET SUE, JUST YOU (in a Noone-Poston-Hines mood):

To get the full effect, set the YouTube “toothed wheel” or “gear” to 1080, watch in full screen with sufficient volume, gather the family, roll up the rug . . . .

More to come! And I don’t mean simply another set of videos, but Clint and friends will be playing the Wednesday Night Hop in Mountain View, on January 8, 2014 — a very good way to welcome the New Year in.  Details here.  (And on the 15th, Emily Asher’s Garden Party will take the stand!)

May your happiness increase!

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

I find myself in polite revolt against all varieties of medical assistance.  On one coast, I am told that certain procedures are necessary; on another, certain substances are to be ingested morning and night. I am very fond of all my healers, Western and Eastern, and have friendly relations with them.

But I’ve cancelled all my appointments except for one with this Doctor.  The office hours are “whenever you feel like it,” (s)he has no office manager, there are no forms to fill out, and (s)he asks for no co-pay.

I feel better already.  Don’t you?

The musicians — who deserve all the credit and  gratitude in the world for making healing come alive — are Clint Baker, cornet / vocal; Bill Carter, clarinet; Jim Klippert, trombone; Jason Vanderford, Bill Reinhart, Sam Rocha, strings; J Hansen, drums.  Recorded in January 2013 at a Wednesday Night Hop.

May your happiness increase!

LOVE SONGS AND SOME RHYTHM: CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS SWING BAND at the WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP (August 14, 2013)

This music makes me feel very nostalgic for summer in California with the Beloved and among friends, and happy to know I will be out there again in 2014. One of our staunch musical friends is the eminent Clint Baker.

These performances take me back to an evening in Mountain View, at “the Wednesday Night Hop,” where Clint and his New Orleans Swing Band gave us all, not just the dancers, reason to be very happy.  The NOSB was Clint, of course, trumpet and vocal; Benny Archey, trombone; Bill Carter, clarinet; Jason Vanderford, banjo / guitar; Sam Rocha, string bass; Steve Apple, drums.

I DON’T WANT TO SET THE WORLD ON FIRE:

YEARNING:

JOE LOUIS STOMP:

Trombonist Benny Archey was new to me.  He could be drummer / pianist Jeff Hamilton’s brother, so strong in the resemblance, but Mr. Archey is a retired Wyoming orchid grower, visiting California intermittently, who plays serious trombone.  I was very glad to meet and hear him.  And the rest of the band!  The distinctive voices of the front line players, weaving and bobbing expertly, and that rhythm section!  Dance music of the highest order. Thanks, as always, to these brilliant navigators of melody, and to Audrey Kanemoto and the people who create and sustain the Wednesday Night Hop.

May your happiness increase!

BE GLAD YOU ARE ALIVE AND HAVE EARS AND EYES TO HEAR AND SEE (THE CONTINUING SAGA OF GRATITUDE IN 4/4): SARA LAMHARZI, JASON VANDERFORD, CLINT BAKER

Two fellows and a gal in the park . . . something special, sweet music and sweet images for us.  Thanks to Sara Lamharzi (videographer); Jason Vanderford (banjo, vocal); Clint Baker (cornet, clarinet).

We hope for more beautiful music, so neatly captured on film — visit Sara’s YouTube channel here.

WHAT CAN I SAY, DEAR (AFTER I SAY I’M SORRY)?:

IN THE SHADE OF THE OLD APPLE TREE:

Oh, are we grateful!

May your happiness increase.

“ON WITH THE DANCE” (Part One): CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND at the WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP in MOUNTAIN VIEW (Jan. 3, 2013)

How to start the New Year — any New Year — right!  A swing dance with hot music provided by Clint Baker’s New Orleans Jazz Band, with beautiful playing from Clint (trumpet / vocal); Jim Klippert (trombone, vocal); Bill Carter (clarinet); Jason Vanderford (guitar, vocal); Bill Reinhart (banjo), Sam Rocha (string bass), J Hansen (drums).

I had a wonderful time.  Although you can’t see them, the dancers were explosively happy — and I think these video performances will rock and shout their way through the smallest computer monitor, the most tiny speakers.  Or your money back.

AVALON:

SISTER KATE:

WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP:

SWEET LOTUS BLOSSOM:

DOCTOR JAZZ:

ALL OF ME:

THE SECOND LINE:

BLACK SNAKE BLUES:

DINAH:

Is there anyone finer?  I thought not.

Californians are so lucky — not only for grapefruit trees and Meyer lemon trees, delicious local kale, and Amoeba Music — but they can go to a Wednesday Night Hop more often than I can.  I went to one where Clint’s band (with almost the same personnel) rocked the room — in 2012, and it was memorable indeed.  Part One and Part Two.

Here you can find out information about future Wednesday Night Hops.  (Thank you, Audrey Kanemoto!)

More to come in the second part, once everyone’s computer has cooled down.

May your happiness increase.

A HOT BAND IS GOOD TO FIND (Part Two): CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND at the WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP (August 1, 2012)

Jim Klippert said it best.  “I always wanted to play with a band like this.”

On August 1, 2012, Clint Baker’s New Orleans Jazz Band rocked the house — the Cheryl Burke Dance Studio in Mountain View, California — at the “Wednesday Night Hop.”

The participants?  Clint on trumpet and vocal; Jim Klippert, trombone; Bill Carter, clarinet; Jason Vanderford, guitar; Bill Reinhart, banjo; Tom Wilson, string bass; Steve Apple, drums.

Here’s where you can find out about future Wednesday Night Hops.

And here’s the first part of the evening.

Now, to the second.  The constant delights were beautiful ensemble energy and precision, wonderful hot playing — passion, relaxation, and intuition — no matter what the tempo.  More than one person let me know that the first set was so entrancingly distracting that it got them off track at work . . . . I have visions of people at their desks all over the world trying hard to stay focused while Sister Kate does her thing . . . . for Clint and his colleagues create music that is deliciously distracting.  Their music is a sure cure for gloom, tedium, ennui, Victorian swoons, pins-and-needles, existential dread, coffee nerves, the blahs, low blood sugar, high anxiety, and more.

SISTER KATE (or, for the archivists in the room, GET OFF KATIE’S HEAD):

Woe, woe.  It’s CARELESS LOVE.  Be careful, now!

Thanks to Puccini, here’s AVALON, not too fast:

For Bix, for Louis, for Papa Joe — ROYAL GARDEN BLUES:

SOMEDAY SWEETHEART:

KNEE DROPS is an irresistible Louis Armstrong song from the Hot Five sessions. For this post, I tried to find more information on what the dance move would have looked like in 1926 . . .but I am not sure that the “knee drop” as practiced in break-dancing and ballet would have been recognized at the Sunset Cafe or other Chicago nightspots:

When in doubt, SHAKE THAT THING (defined loosely):

May your happiness increase.

A HOT BAND IS GOOD TO FIND (Part One): CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND at the WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP (August 1, 2012)

What happened in Mountain View, California, on Wednesday, August 1, 2012, might have been noted by global weather scientists as the best kind of seismic alteration.  Clint Baker’s New Orleans Jazz Band played two sets for dancers at the “Wednesday Night Hop” held at the Cheryl Burke Dance Studio and they made the cosmos rock — as far as I and the dancers could tell.

The participants?  Clint on trumpet and vocal; Jim Klippert, trombone; Bill Carter, clarinet; Jason Vanderford, guitar; Bill Reinhart, banjo; Tom Wilson, string bass; Steve Apple, drums.

Here’s where you can find out about future Wednesday Night Hops: the street address, the admission cost, directions.

And here’s the first part of the evening.

But a word before you immerse yourselves in the rocking hot sounds.

Some of my nicest readers gently write in, “Michael, you really should have put your camera here or there,” and I try not to let that SHOULD weigh too heavily on me. The gentle suggesters do not realize that I am at these gigs because the band members are generous kind people who put up with my presence and my camera.  But the world is not my personal video studio and I am trying my best to be unobtrusive — not the jazz world’s Erich von Stroheim.

So at Mountain View I could have set up my camera under a huge whirring electric fan (needed to keep the dancers from heatstroke) or over the drums.  I chose the latter and initially I was anxious.  But necessity is not only an inventive mother — sometimes Miss Necessity is a real pal (think of Joan Blondell in the Thirties movies where she tells the naive heroine what really needs to be said).

Setting up close to Steve Apple was a religious experience, for he played with such quiet strength,  such variety of sound and timbre, such deep swing that my vantage point was a true gift.  You can hear how the horns floated on top of and through this blissful rhythm section . . . . and how they mixed 2012 swing with a beautiful New Orleans splendor!  Clint’s solid lead would have made the masters grin; Bill Carter and Jim Klippert weave curlicues and romp on the harmonies in the best way — and those fellows in the back: Reinhart and Vanderford and Wilson would get my vote for Best String Trio anywhere.  The real thing, alive and well.

Clint called DALLAS BLUES to start, which is the hallmark of a man who loves the music — and he had been playing Luis Russell in the car on the way down to Mountain View, always a good idea:

ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY is a sweet Jabbo Smith tune that’s getting more play these days (Eddie Erickson does it, too!) — romance in swingtime:

WHISPERING shows, once again, how a band sensitive to the dancers can swing anything:

RED SAILS IN THE SUNSET brings back 1935 Louis (this is a Decca band) and the New Orleans tradition of playing pop tunes rather than sticking to a narrow repertoire of  “good old good ones”: I think of Bunk Johnson preferring PISTOL PACKIN’ MAMA and MARIA ELENA on dance gigs:

EVERYBODY LOVES MY BABY, with the verse — and I swung my camera around to catch the expert hopping of Audrey Kanemoto, our heroine, and Manu Smith.  Watching this video, I thought of the Czech writer Josef Skvorecky, who loved jazz and had been an amateur saxophonist in his homeland under a variety of occupations.  In one of his novels, he has a passage describing playing in a band while the current love of his life is doing a beautiful expert vigorous Charleston to the music.  He would have loved to see this band and these dancers:

There was no beer at Mountain View, although there were Fritos in little bags from the vending machine.  Perhaps that’s why THE BUCKET’S GOT A HOLE IN IT came to mind.  Or perhaps it was time for some Lowdown Groove, which I have not found in any vending machine:

WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP, a fast blues for the Lindy Hoppers:

I love SOLID OLD MAN — a simple line from the session that Rex Stewart, Barney Bigard, and Billy Taylor did with Django in 1939:

KRAZY KAPERS is, as Clint mentions, a line on DIGA DIGA DOO — recorded first by Benny Carter in 1933 with one of our dream bands, featuring Floyd O’Brien, Chu Berry, Sidney Catlett, Teddy Wilson, Max Kaminsky, Lawrence Lucie, and Ernest Hill.  (Thank you, John Hammond!):

My goodness!  What a hot band!  And there’s more to come.

May your happiness increase.

HOP TO IT! (A SWING DANCE PARTY with CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND) August 1, 2012)

I know it’s short notice for anyone who’s not reasonably close to San Francisco . . . but Wednesday night, August 1, 2012, will reverberate with jazz fireworks in Mountain View, California, because Clint Baker’s New Orleans Jazz Band will be playing a swing dance party at the Wednesday Night Hop — from 9:30 to midnight.

The participants?  Clint on trumpet; Jim Klippert, trombone; Bill Carter, clarinet; Jason Vanderford, guitar; Bill Reinhart, banjo; Tom Wilson, string bass; Steve Apple, drums.

Here’s where you can find out all the essentials: the street address, the admission cost, directions . . . but find your dance shoes and your best Lindy Hop getup and get down there!

Why?

Here’s a selection from Clint’s appearance at a Wednesday Night Hop in August 2011.  Different personnel for the most part — but Clint’s bands are seismic phenomena: Clint, Jim Klippert, Jason Vanderford will be returning — the rest of last year’s crew were Robert Banics, clarinet; Jeff Hamilton, piano; Sam Rocha, bass and tuba; J. Hansen, drums.

Come over and say hello at this WNH!

May your happiness increase.

EXACTLY LIKE THIS! (“KATIE AND THE LOST BOYS,” December 6, 2011)

Initially, I thought the band name was misleading — even though I understood the reference to PETER PAN.  Clint Baker (heard here on clarinet and trumpet) and Jason Vanderford (banjo) seem like the least-lost-fellows in the cosmos . . . they never miss a beat!  But I accept the title on behalf of Katie Cavera, who certainly provokes lovely thoughts whether she’s playing, singing, or just sitting down in front of her breakfast . . .and she surely can fly (no need for the feathers)!

We owe thanks to the musicians and to Alisa Clancy — whose December 6, 2011, end-of-the-year party at her “Jazz on the Hill” class at San Mateo Community College we’re now enjoying.  And of course we owe thanks to Rae Ann Berry, who took her camera, tripod, and enthusiasm to capture this music for us.

Exactly like this, exactly like them, EXACTLY LIKE YOU:

When some people might ask, “Should I reveal / exactly how I feel?” we might be tempted to say, “Gee, I’ve got to run.  Will you look at that time?” — but this group can reveal its feelings all they like . . . play it till 2051:

Katie sings I WISH I COULD SHIMMY LIKE MY SISTER KATE — beautifully, as always.  Some of you may be troubled by the postmodern aspect of this — isn’t Katie Cavera our Sister Kate?  How can she sing about herself in the third person?  Don’t let these metafictional trifles ruin your pleasure:

And here’s Clint to tell us all about Al Capone, Johnny Dodds, and a hat — tales worth spinning — as prelude to a lovely rendition of SARATOGA SWING:

Another one of Miss Cavera’s signature numbers, that paean to erotic activity — time’s a-wasting!  We’re burning moonlight here!  Ah, DO SOMETHING:

And a version of JUST A CLOSER WALK WITH THEE (in two tempos) that’s full of feeling and personal significance, as Clint explains:

We’ll close with another vision of Paradise — did J.M. Barrie know this one? — called AVALON:

Exactly!

AT THE HOP (Part Two): CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND (Aug. 20, 2011)

One set by Clint Baker’s New Orleans Jazz Band wouldn’t have been enough for anyone — either the audience at the Wednesday Night Hop at Mountain View, California, or for the wider audience of JAZZ LIVES.  So here’s the second collection of exuberances: six songs, four of them explicitly New Orleans-rooted, the other two jazz classics.

And a surprise.  When the band took to the stage for the first set, it was Clint (trumpet, leader, vocals); Jim Klippert (trombone, vocal); Robert Banics (clarinet), Jason Vanderford (banjo, vocal); Sam Rocha (bass, tuba); J. Hansen (drums), Carl Sonny Leyland (piano).  But a very nimble pianist — masquerading as the brilliant drummer Jeff Hamilton — was prevailed upon to sit in, and Jeff played the first four tunes of the set, having a good time himself.

And you’ll notice the absence of microphones.  Who needs them when you’ve got swing this hot?

Those tunes?  Well, why not start off with a Debussyian dream, full of watercolor shadings and sweet pastels?  On second thought, let the impressionists be dreamy elsewhere.  Here’s TIGER RAG:

Clint (who’s not a whiner) likes the Jelly Roll Morton tune, a thinly-veiled advertisement of erotic prowess, WININ’ BOY BLUES.  Don’t deny his name:

William H. Tyers’ classic PANAMA followed, its multiple strains in place:

And one of the most-often played and most durable songs in the common language of small-band-swing, HONEYSUCKLE ROSE:

Carl came back to play his part in an energetic SOME OF THESE DAYS:

And the set closed with a funky blues — somewhere between Bill Haley and the Comets and MOP MOP — which I know as JOE AVERY’S PIECE (although it might also be JOE AVERY’S BLUES):

Oh, play those things!

AT THE HOP: CLINT BAKER’S NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BAND (Part One): AUG. 20, 2011

Getting the kitten down from the tree is heroic, as is untying the maiden from the railroad tracks as the train bears down on her.  But so is what Clint Baker and his New Orleans Jazz Band did at Mountain View, California, on August 20, 2011 — making the room and the dancers vibrate with a sweet intensity.

Here’s the evidence.  Clint led the band on trumpet, with Jim Klippert (trombone), Robert Barics (clarinet), Carl Sonny Leyland (piano), Jason Vanderford (banjo), Sam Rocha (bass and tuba), Jason (or J.) Hansen (drums).  I had watched and heard versions of this band at Cafe Borrone (through the generosity of Rae Ann Berry and her Magic Tripod) and they are superb, but I was unprepared for the hot energy that emanated from this group — no microphones except for Clint’s announcements — and took over the room.

They began their set with AVALON, effectively wiping out any associations with Benny Goodman or Al Jolson:

Then, Clint sang James P. Johnson’s ONE HOUR and the band followed his entreaty in the best spirit:

Drummer Paul Barbarin is a beloved figure to me because of the way he drove both the Luis Russell band and the Louis Armstrong Orchestra (1935-39).  But he also composed BOURBON STREET PARADE and the jolly THE SECOND LINE:

SWEET LOTUS BLOSSOM, a paean to some herb or other, was a feature for singer-banjoist Jason Vanderford.  Knocked me right out!

MILENBERG JOYS (or GOLDEN LEAF STRUT, a cousin of the BLOSSOM above) just romped:

TEXAS MOANER BLUES points backwards in time to Sidney Bechet and Louis Armstrong, but it seems vigorous in its moaning splendor today:

And the set closed with Clint’s swinging exercise in New Orleans group therapy (with help from Dr. Klippert from Vienna), YOU TELL ME YOUR DREAM:

The dancers loved it, as I did.  And there’s another, equally hot set to come.  And this event was sponsored by WEDNESDAY NIGHT HOP — check out their site for information on future events:

http://wednesdaynighthop.com/events/CaliforniaWorkshop2011.php

THOSE RHYTHM MEN: CLINT BAKER’S CAFE BORRONE ALL-STARS (April 1, 2011)

We know that we’ve made it through a very extended winter when we can hear Clint Baker’s Cafe Borrone All-Stars swing out (thanks to the devotion of Rae Ann Berry and her Magic Tripod). 

Recorded April 1, 2011, but everything here is for real. 

The CBAS are Clint, banjo / guitar / vocal; Leon Oakley, cornet; Jim Klippert, trombone; Robert Young, soprano sax; Bill Reinhart, bass; Steve Apple or Riley Baker, drums, joined by Jason Vanderford, banjo.

Here’s a very sweet-hot WHISPERING:

A perfect combination: Clint sings I’M CRAZY ‘BOUT MY BABY (and the band goes back for the verse in the middle:

How about SOME OF THESE DAYS (catch Leon’s riffing behind Robert and more — including a group vocal behind Clint):

I know why I waited . . . no one does those love scenes EXACTLY LIKE YOU (Leon in a very Beriganesque mood, ten-year old Riley Baker on drums):

Another one for Fats and Louis — THAT RHYTHM MAN:

If your GPS is recalculating, you might sing “Where shall I go?” or the SONG OF THE WANDERER:

Finally, since candor is a beautiful thing, remember IT’S A SIN TO TELL A LIE:

To prepare for your trip to Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park (where Clint’s All-Stars play most Friday nights), do visit http://www.cafeborrone.com.  The Beloved and I are looking forward to our first in-person visit this summer! 

Thanks to the gentlemen of the ensemble, to Rae Ann, and to Roy Borrone, the rhythm man of great renown who has kept hot jazz alive at his restaurant for two decades.

More videos from this session can be seen at “SFRaeAnn” on YouTube — if you haven’t subscribed, you’re missing a great deal of inspired elation.

ENSEMBLE JOYS: “SAY ‘SI SI'”!

The New Orleans musicians — even the ones who took expansive solos as the nature of jazz changed — knew how important inspired ensemble playing was.  It would have been very bad form to cut short a romping group effort and simply dilute its force into a series of solos with the rhythm section. 

And this principle is perfectly demonstrated by a recent performance by Clint Baker and the Cafe Borrone All-Stars (captured on August 13, 2010, by the unwearying Rae Ann Berry) of the pop song “SAY ‘SI SI'” where for nearly five minutes the front line keeps a splendid momentum going. 

That’s Clint on trumpet and clarinet, Jim Klippert on trombone, Robert Young on a variety of reeds, Bill Rinehart on banjo, Jason Vanderford on guitar, and Sam Rocha on bass:

Just try and keep sedately still while this video is playing . . . !

VIDEOGRAPHERS THREE!

What do Rae Ann Berry, Elin Smith, and Lisa (Mook) Ryan have in common?  They’re all women who have a deep involvement in jazz, even though they don’t play instruments.  Nor are they married to instrumentalists or players. 

All three are very creative members of the jazz audience — which is often more male than female.  But they do more than sit and applaud: they are improvisers behind the camera, video artists. 

Rae Ann is known to many by her YouTube channel name — SFRaeAnn — and she takes her camera to jazz happenings on the West Coast: regularly, she finds Clint Baker and his band at Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park, or a solo piano recital by the esteemed Ray Skjelbred at Pier 23 in San Francisco, as well as regularly videorecording jazz fetival performances.  Here are two of her most recent captures:

From July 20, 2010, here’s Ray working his deep-blue way through KMH DRAG, an impromptu blues line created by Max Kaminsky, Freddie Moore, and Art Hodes for a memorable Blue Note record date in (I believe) 1944:

And ten days later, Rae Ann recorded Clint and friends at Cafe Borrone, playing HINDUSTAN.  That’s Clint, clarinet; Leon Oakley, trumpet and necktie; Jim Klippert, trombone; Jason Vanderford, guitar; Bill Reinhart, bass; Steve Apple, drums; and Robert Young, banjo.  There’s good rocking tonight, New Orleans-style:

Elin Smith lives in England, and it was my good fortune to meet her and Ron, her husband, last year at Whitley Bay and again this year.

Elin loves to record jazz performances, but also is fascinated by composing films: her YouTube channel is “elinshouse,” and here she’s trained her lens on two performances by Thomas Winteler, who sounds more like Sidney Bechet than anyone I’ve ever  heard.  These songs are from the most recent Whitley Bay International Jazz Festival, where Thomas was joined by my hero Bent Persson on trumpet, Michel Bard on reeds, Lou Laprete on piano, Henri Lamaire on bass, and Ron Houghton on drums for ALLIGATOR CRAWL:

And a triumphant POTATO HEAD BLUES.  Like its predecessor, it suggests what might have happened if Sidney had brought his clarinet into the OKeh studios while Louis and his Hot Seven were recording:

Finally, there’s Lisa (Mook) Ryan, another Californian. 

Lisa is intrigued not only by the music of Bix Beiderbecke but by the people who continue to investigate it, play it, and keep his legacy alive.  She’s done wonderfully atmospheric films set to Bix’s music.  Here’s IN THE DARK (as played by Dick Hyman) which she’s used atmospherically — creating juxtapositions of slowly-observed still photographs — to muse on what Bix experienced and felt in the year 1928, all seen as shades of light, shadow, and blackness.  Other impressionistic creations of Lisa’s can be seen on her “MookRyan” channel:

 Most recently, under the heading of “MookCam,” she’s captured cornetist Andy Schumm in performance.  Although youthful, Andy has so many fans with video cameras (including myself) that he might be the most-documented jazz musician of the last two or three years — a singular tribute to his talent and the affection it inspires! 

Here are Andy and His Gang at the Putnam Museum, on July 22, 2010.  Andy is playing Bix’s cornet, John Otto on clarinet and sax, Vince Giordano on bass sax/tuba/string bass, Dave Bock on trombone, David Boeddinghaus on the Beiderbecke family piano, Leah Bezin on banjo, and Josh Duffee on drums for a merging of CLARINET MARMALADE and SINGIN’ THE BLUES:

The generous creativity of RaeAnn, Elin, and Lisa inspires us!

“I’M THE WININ’ BOY (DON’T DENY MY NAME)”

Cafe Borrone in Menlo Park, California, looks like a perfectly nice restaurant in the middle of a shopping mall — but it has hot jazz every week.  (Wish that the mall nearest to me could get this idea.)  And Rae Ann Berry is there, faithfully. 

She captured a particularly rewarding session by Clint Baker’s Cafe Borrone All-Stars on May 14, 2010, from which I’ve taken Jelly Roll Morton’s WININ’ BOY (there’s been a small fervent discussion of whether it’s WININ’ or WINDIN’ or WINDING or WiNDING BALL and what those terms suggest . . . the usual consensus is that they refer to various types of male sexual prowess: use your imaginations). 

On this lengthy soulful version, Clint is at the drums, doing splendid things with cymbal accents; Bill Reinhart is providing a powerful string bass pulse; Jason Vanderford takes a rare acoustic guitar solo late in the performance; Robert Young emotes beautifully on the soprano sax; Jim Klippert not only anchors things on trombone but takes an impassioned vocal; trumpeter Leon Oakley finds just the right mute for each chorus; Ray Skjelbred “makes that old piano [in this case an electric keyboard] sound exactly like new,” or even better, with right-hand splashes and solid chords. 

A wonderfully cohesive group – – – especially in the middle of grilled chicken salads.  Don’t deny their names!

Thanks, as always, to Rae Ann, to the band, and even to the shoppers and diners who make this gig possible.

NEVER TOO BUSY . . .

Courtesy of “SFRaeAnn,” here’s just under five minutes of pure relaxed pleasure: Clint Baker and his Cafe Borrone All-Stars, recordeon on April 3 at Menlo Park, California, with Robert Young, C-meloody sax;  Leon Oakley, cornet;  Jim Klippert, trombone; Jason Vanderford,  guitar;  Monte Reyes, banjo; and Bill Reinhart, bass.  Visit Clint at: http://www.clintbakerjazz.com

I’m especially fond of this almost-forgotten tune (memorable to me because of a 1928 recording where Louis Armstrong backs Lillie Delk Christian) but this performance is special in itself.  No one rushes the tempo; no one gets loud or louder, and the musicians work together in a casual, affectionate understanding of what a band needs.  Great fun, and if you’re too busy for this, what can I say?