Tag Archives: jazz party

IT’S CLASSIC! THE CLEVELAND CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (Sept. 14-17, 2017)

Scott Robinson at the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party

Over the last dozen years, I have been to a variety of jazz parties and festivals, all of them deeply rewarding in singular ways.  But I have the longest ties to the Cleveland Classic Jazz Party.  Once it was Jazz at Chautauqua, then the Allegheny Jazz Party . . . but even when the name changes and the CCJP finds a new hotel to nest in, its spirited heart remains the same — very reassuring.  I also have a long history of writing about it: the very first post I did (2008) on this blog was called GOIN’ TO CHAUTAUQUA, and I’ve been posting videos from it for perhaps seven years now also.  Here is the post I wrote about the Party in June of this year: it has glorious music from Hal Smith, Frank Tate, and Rossano Sportiello at its center, too.

For those who shrink from Facebook as from Hades, the CCJP’s site is here.

Details?  On cornet / trumpet, Duke Heitger, Randy Reinhart, Andy Schumm; on trombone, Dan Barrett; on reeds, Dan Block, Ken Peplowski, Scott Robinson; on guitar / banjo, Howard Alden, Andy Brown; on piano, Ehud Asherie, James Dapogny, John Di Martino, Rossano Sportiello; on string bass, Joel Forbes, Nicki Parrott, Frank Tate; on drums, Ricky Malichi, Pete Siers, Hal Smith; on vocal, Petra van Nuis; gypsy swing quartet, the Faux Frenchmen; historian (giving a presentation on Ella’s centennial) Phil Atteberry.

On Thursday night, there’s an informal session (for donors and weekend patrons only) that begins at 7:30.  Friday begins with Phil Atteberry’s presentation on Ella (10:30-11:30) and then there are piano solos from 2-4 and an evening set from 5:30-11 and an hour’s set — anything goes — in the “Jazz Club.”  Saturday, music from 10-2 and again from 5:30-11 and 11-12.  Sunday, 9-1:30.  That is a banquet of music and good feeling, and because all the events are in the same hotel, there is no scuttling between one site and another.  Nancy Hancock Griffith and Kathy Hancock are kind and attentive to detail, so things work.  I booked the hotel some months back, and a plane trip more recently.

There’s nothing like being on the scene, digging the sounds, among like-minded and likeable people.  Now, some video evidence.

and

and

As musicians used to say, “Don’t sleep on this one.”  As I say, “It’s only six weeks away, and the CCJP has been known to sell out — not in an aesthetic way, mind you.  See you there!

And — to get darker, but only for two bars.  Money and health and plans get in the way of people attending parties and festivals and gigs, and no one could take those facts lightly.  But I meet so many people who say, nicely, “Oh, I’d love to go there.  Maybe in a couple of years!” and when the couple of years have passed, the “there” is no longer there.  If you can, bestir yourself.  Events — as large as the CCHP or as compact as the guitar trio at the local restaurant on Friday — vanish without your support.  And doing is always better than wishing you had done.  What’s gone is gone.

May your happiness increase!

WE HAD A BALL: THE 2014 ALLEGHENY JAZZ PARTY

The first thing you need to know is that the 2015 Allegheny Jazz Party will take place on September 10-13, 2015, at the Inter-Continental Hotel (near the Cleveland Clinic) in Cleveland, Ohio.

“Michael, that’s a year from now.  Why are you telling us this?”

I had such a good time at the AJP just concluded that I want everyone to get ready for next year: wonderful music in profusion, comfortable surroundings, a quiet and attentive audience paying serious attention to the good sounds, good food, comfortable rooms in a hotel full of very friendly staff.  Ease and friendliness prevailed, thanks to Nancy Griffith and Kathy Hancock, who could run a medium-sized country with gentleness and efficiency.

You’ll notice I put MUSIC at the top of that list.  Here’s a sample — the second performance from the informal session on Thursday night, created by Duke Heitger, trumpet; Bob Havens (amazing at 84 or any age), trombone; Nicki Parrott, string bass; Howard Alden, guitar; Rossano Sportiello, piano:

You can keep up with the AJP here or at website.

The experience at the AJP was special for reasons beyond the splendid music: a rare comfort was in the air and the guests were so easy with one another.  If you have a 2015 calendar, I encourage you to mark the dates on it now.  You won’t be sorry.

More videos to come.

May your happiness increase!   

A BOWL OF CHERRIES?

A true story in parable’s clothing follows.

As a child — aside from my refusal to eat peanut-butter and jelly sandwiches — I was happily omnivorous.  But I had gotten it into my head that I didn’t like ripe cherries.  It could have been my reaction to a pie made with canned filling, but I turned away from the real fruit for years.  Then, someone said, “You don’t like cherries?  Try one of these!”  A rapturous experience.  But while I was savoring the fruit, I thought to myself, “There’s twenty years that you could have been enjoying this experience, and you didn’t, because of some irrational prejudice that stuck.”

This story came to mind yesterday.

Earlier this year I was at a jazz party (its name doesn’t matter) whose stylistic range sat easily between the Wolverines and Buck Clayton — call it “small band swing,” “Condon style,” “Mainstream.”  Delightful in all its variations.

But one of the sets, as an experiment (the musicians got to suggest their own thematic ideas) was a tribute to Bill Evans.  I had only heard Evans’ works for piano trio, for the most part, but when a small group of musicians I admire took the stage, I soon settled into the adventurousness of the music, as improvised lines crossed in midair, echoed, crackled and resounded.  The set was thoroughly uplifting.

Seated near me was someone — a semipro musician whom I’ve come to respect, a perceptive listener, someone devoted to the music in many ways.  Sandy [an invented name] looked at me when the set concluded, with a serious facial expression, and said, “Well?”  I replied, “I thought it was marvelous.”  Sandy frowned.  “Well, I don’t understand it.  And I don’t like it!

Not wanting to seem too didactic, I said quietly, “Forty years ago if I had heard that coming out of the radio, I might have turned away in annoyance.  But if you listen closely to it, all sorts of interesting and lovely things are going on.”  “Well, I don’t like it.”  End of discussion.

Later in that same weekend, someone saw me videoing and we got into conversation.  This person planned to visit Manhattan; I offered to send information about places to go, people to hear.  Again, after expressions of gratitude, there was the same ominous facial expression.  “I don’t like any of that progressive stuff.”  Another door closed somewhere.  I said only, “New York is full of musicians you might not have heard of who play the music you like to hear.”

Do you think if I had told these stern people my story of the cherries they would have seen its relevance?

I am not proposing that all art should be embraced equally.  People who say “I like everything!” always make me wonder if they really understand what they enthusiastically espouse.  But arteriosclerosis of its audience’s sensibilities can kill off an art form.

May your happiness increase.

JAZZ AT CHAUTAUQUA (AND MORE) IS COMING: SEPTEMBER 2012

When I was a child, Autumn came a few weeks after the mingled delights and worries of Back to School.  Later, Autumn meant no more barbecues for another year and the start of leaf-raking, gutter-cleaning and other suburban joys.  But since September 2004, I have a different set of associations — all exceedingly pleasant.

To be accurate, Autumn (or Fall) 2012 begins — in the Northern Hemisphere — on September 22, at 10:49 Eastern Daylight Time.  I looked it up.

The Beloved and I will be celebrating the change of seasons as we have done for the past years at Jazz at Chautauqua, the fifteenth such exaltation.

Chautauqua takes place at the glorious Athenaeum Hotel (built in 1881 and architecturally fascinating) from Thursday, September 20, to Sunday, September 23.  On Thursday, there’s a delightful series of  informal jam sets; Friday afternoon features piano and guitar solos and duets in the parlor, and on Friday evening a cornucopia of wonderful sounds begins and doesn’t stop until Sunday afternoon.  I’ve been filming live performances there for a few years, so you have only to head over to my YouTube channel, “swingyoucats,” and search for “Chautauqua” to have strong evidence of what fun awaits.

Here’s that great Romantic, John Sheridan, playing MY FOOLISH HEART:

This year, the personnel is quite wonderful (although that is frankly no surprise):

Cornet / trumpet: Duke Heitger, Jon-Erik Kellso, Randy Reinhart, Andy Schumm; reeds: Harry Allen, Dan Block, Bob Reitmeier, Scott Robinson, Alex Hoffman;  trombone: Dan Barrett, Bob Havens;  guitar/banjo: Howard Alden, Marty Grosz;  piano: Mike Greensill, Keith Ingham, John Sheridan, Rossano Sportiello; bass: Jon Burr, Kerry Lewis, Frank Tate; drums: Ricky Malichi, Pete Siers, John Von Ohlen;  vocals: Marty Grosz, Rebecca Kilgore, Wesla Whitfield.  Bands: Alden-Barrett Quintet; Faux Frenchmen (Don Aren, bass; George Cunningham, guitar; Brian Lovely, guitar; Joe Lukasik, clarinet; Paul Patterson, violin);  Photographic exhibit by Duncan P. Schiedt.

Here’s Duke Heitger and friends taking us into the jungle for a hot TIGER RAG:

All these men and women have been personally approved of by JAZZ LIVES and they have received this blogsite’s Seal of Approval.

Jazz at Chautauqua is one of those weekend parties where life is comfortable: guests staying at the hotel have only to come down a flight of stairs (or take the antique elevator) to find their wishes gratified: jazz, copious amounts of food and drink, smiling staff, a basket of apples on the front desk, beautiful views of Lake Chautauqua).  For details of pricing, reservations, and the like, all will be revealed here.

But wait!  There’s more!

For those of you who want to learn from the Masters — a most amiable crew of people whom we admire — before Jazz at Chautauqua begins, there will be the first-ever, turbo-charged, fully synchronous Traditional Jazz Workshop.  You will be able to study with Professors Kilgore, Lewis, Sportiello, Malichi, Heitger, Barrett, Robinson, Alden.  Dan Barrett is the Music Director and I am told that it is all Pass / Fail but no one ever Fails.  The details are on the same page; the Workshop runs from September 16 to the 20th, and students can stay at the hotel.  If my embouchure can be made to improve by early September, I may ask my colleagues to cover my classes, pack my valve oil and my cornet and become a student again.  I know there’s so much to learn!

I can hear some of you saying, “Michael, aren’t you rushing our summers away?  It isn’t even Bastille Day and here you are talking us into September.”  True, true.  But summer’s lease hath too short a date.  And — if not now, when?

I look forward to seeing some of my JAZZ LIVES friends there.  Heaven knows the bandstand will be full of them.

May your happiness increase.

“JAZZ LIVES” GOES TO A PARTY (August 9, 2011)

Marc Caparone and Dawn Lambeth are dear friends and superb musicians.  When they heard that the Beloved and I were coming to California for much of this summer, Marc proposed a jazz evening to be held at their house, and spoke of it in the most flattering way as the “Michael Steinman Jazz Party,” a name that both embarrassed and delighted me.

And it happened on Tuesday, August 9, 2011.  You’ll see some of the results here: great music from good-humored, generous people.

The guests — of a musical sort — were a small group of warmly rewarding musicians.  Besides Marc (cornet and string bass) and Dawn (vocals), there were Dan Barrett (trombone, cornet), John “Butch” Smith (soprano and alto saxophones), Vinnie Armstrong (piano), and Mike Swan (guitar and vocals).  The listeners included the Beloved, Bill and Sandy Gallagher (fine friends and jazz enthusiasts), Cathie Swan (Mike’s wife), Mary Caparone (Marc’s mother), James Arden Caparone (four months but with a great musical future in front of him), and a few others whose names I didn’t get to record (so sorry!).

Jazz musicians take great pleasure in these informal, relaxed happenings: no pressure to play faster, louder, to show off to an already sated crowd.  In such settings, even the most familiar old favorites take on new life, and unusual material blossoms.  We all witnessed easy, graceful, witty, heartfelt improvising on the spot.  And you will, too.

Jazz itself was the guest of honor.  Everyone knew that their efforts were also reaching the larger audience of JAZZ LIVES, so this happy cyber-audience was in attendance as well, although silent.

The first informal group (Dan on cornet, Butch on soprano, Vinnie, Marc on bass, and Mike) led off with Walter Donaldson’s MY BUDDY, performed at what I think of as Lionel Hampton 1939 tempo:

Then, evoking memories of Jim Goodwin and the Sunset Music Company (more about that later), the band created a buoyant homage to Dorothy Fields and Jimmy McHugh, to Duke Ellington, and to Bill Robinson, in DOIN’ THE NEW LOWDOWN:

A request from the Beloved for ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET (in 1945 Goodman Sextet tempo) was both honored and honorable:

Dawn — sweetly full of feeling and casual swing — joined the band for S’WONDERFUL:

After Dan told one of his Ruby Braff stories, Dawn followed up with BLUE MOON, one of her favorites, and you can hear The Boy (that’s James Arden) singing along in his own fashion:

Then the band shifted — Marc put down the string bass and picked up his cornet to lead the way alongside Dan, now on trombone, for ROSETTA:

And a really fascinating exploration of a song that isn’t played much at all (although Billie, Lester, Roy, and the Kansas City Five are back of it), LAUGHING AT LIFE, explored in the best way by Marc, Butch, and Vinnie:

Mike Swan joined this trio for a truly soulful IT’S THE TALK OF THE TOWN:

Without prelude, Mike launched into the verse of WRAP YOUR TROUBLES IN DREAMS (Dan couldn’t help himself and joined in): what a singer Mike is (and he’s listened hard to Crosby, always a good thing)!

Mike also began MELANCHOLY with Dan — wait for Marc and Vinnie adding their voices to this improvisation:

And the session ended with GEORGIA ON MY MIND, scored for a trio of Dan, Mike, and Vinnie:

The informal session came to a gentle stop there, but the music didn’t go away.  Butch had brought with him a video (taken from Dutch television in 1978) of the Sunset Music Company — a band featuring banjoist Lueder Ohlwein, cornetist Jim Goodwin, trombonist Barrett, reedman Smith, pianist Armstrong.  Since Vinnie and Dan and I had never seen the video, we all retreated to the den and watched it.

It was both moving and hilarious to see the men of 2011 watching their much younger 1978 selves, as well as a moving tribute to those who were no longer with us.  I wish there had been time and space to make a documentary about those men watching themselves play. . . . perhaps it’s possible.

I feel immensely fortunate to be surrounded by such beauty, and to have my name attached to it in even the most tangential way is a deep honor.  I can’t believe that it happened, and I send the most admiring thanks to all concerned.  Even if you weren’t there, unable to witness this creation at close range, I think the generous creativity of these musicians will gratify you as well.  This post is a gift also to those who will see it and couldn’t be there: Arianna, Mary, Melissa, Aunt Ida, Hal, June, Candace, Dave, Jeff, Barbara, Sonny, Clint, David, Maxine, Ricky, Margaret, Ella, Melody . . . the list goes on.  These gigabytes and words are sent with love.

A postscript.  JAZZ LIVES is so engrossed with music that I rarely write about anything else, but if you are ever in the Paso Robles, California, area, I urge you to consider spending a night (as the Beloved and I did) at the accurately-named INN PARADISO, 975 Mojave Lane (805-239-2800: innparadiso@att.net).  We have never stayed at a more satisfying place.  Everything was beautiful and comfortable — from the room to the view to the quiet to the dee-licious breakfast, to the gentle friendly kindnesses of Dawna and Steve — making it a genuinely memorable experience.  I want to go back!  See for yourself at www.innparadiso.com.

SEPT. 16, 1963: ASPEN, COLORADO

I can hear it now.

From the left, that’s Danny Barker, guitar; Ed Hall, clarinet; Wild Bill Davison, cornet; a trombonist I don’t recognize.  And the unseen guiding spirit is one Dick Gibson.

Do you think it’s AS LONG AS I LIVE or perhaps THAT DA DA STRAIN?  It sounds good from where I am in 2011.

THE JAZZ FEAST AT SACRAMENTO (May 2011)

The 2011 Sacramento Jazz Festival and Jubilee has just come out with its detailed schedule . . . and it took me several hours before I could begin this post, because the schedule made my head spin.

In the best way, you understand.

Those of my readers who have never been to a jazz party / festival / jubilee which features simultaneous bands or artists in different venues will not quite empathize, but let me explain.  In some jazz spectaculars, it is simply a matter of coming to the main ballroom or the one stage, sitting down, and hearing music for a long period of time.

Not so at Sacramento, an absolute jazz cornucopia.  The festival begins at 11:45 on Friday, May 27, and rollicks on until late afternoon on Monday, May 30.  And what happens during any given time period is nearly overwhelming.  At 5:30 PM on Monday there are eighteen separate bands playing in eighteen venues.  

“Feast or famine,” my mother used to say.

Here’s the schedule, in case you wish to jump ahead and simply immerse yourself in the mathematically delightful possibilities:

http://www.sacjazz.com/schedule/

The result of such abundance, for me, is a mixture of elation and anxiety.  Elation because, “My goodness, look at all the wonderful things there are arranged here for my delight!”  Anxiety: “What if A and B are playing opposite each other, and I want to see both?  What should I do?  Should I commit to one and miss the other, or should I rudely get up in the middle of A’s set and truck on down to B, hoping there should be a seat?”

We should all have such worries, and I plan on working things out — perhaps with a printed schedule on the flight from New York to California.  And having an absolute surfeit of jazz riches is not the worst fate I will face.

Be sure to check out the schedule: even if you cannot see your way to Sacramento this year, perhaps it will act as an inducement to raid the children’s dental fund or the like . . . ?