Tag Archives: Jazz Promo Services

“SIR, COULD YOU DIRECT ME TO 35th AND CALUMET?”

Before the GPS and the smartphone, there were maps.  You can still see people unfolding them on subway platforms, although in certain cities we are told that this is a huge neon sign saying I AM A TOURIST.  PLEASE ROB ME.

But this 1946 map is gloriously different: a map of Chicago hot spots from 1914 to 1928, its co-creators the jazz scholar Paul Edward Miller and the pianist / composer Richard M. Jones.  It’s selling for $400 at New York’s Argosy Bookshop: see details here.

chicago-map
Description: Map. Colored Lithograph. Measures 13.25″ x 19.25″.

Comments: This unique 1946 map of Chicago identifies the Chicago Jazz Spots from 1914 to 1928. Throughout, beautiful sketches depict famous landmarks and jazz scenes. Streets are identified and locations of jazz spots are noted. Two insets detail the establishments on 31st and State and 35th and State. The map, redrawn from the original by Paul Eduard Miller and Richard M. Jones appeared in the 1946 edition of “Esquire’s Jazz Book Year Book of the Jazz Scene”. The year book was an amazing period publication of jazz in its heyday, featuring photographs, articles, and more. Some of the articles that were included in the 1946 edition, along with this particular map, were “Thirty Years of Chicago Jazz”,Chicago Jazz History”, “Esquire’s All-American Band”, etc. The Map is in good condition with some foxing and edge wear near centerfold. Linen backed.

Thanks to Jim Eigo of Jazz Promo Services for letting us know.  Even with some foxing.  You can find him at 845-986-1677, jim@jazzpromoservices.com, and his website is http://www.jazzpromoservices.com.

May your happiness increase!

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL RECORD STORE . . . OR OPEN ONE!

This Saturday, April 17, is Independent Record Store Day worldwide. 

Many’s the happy hour I spent in Record World, Tower Records, Dayton’s, Happy Tunes, and more . . . perusing, considering, talking, hanging out, pouncing on something I’d never seen, wondering whether to spend twenty dollars (1972 dollars!) for BUCK MEETS RUBY or EASY NOW.  I grew up in suburbia, where every department store had a record section.  Those days are mostly gone, although I live near enough to Mr. Cheapo’s to visit, and Academy Records and Second Hand Rose still offer New York thrills. 

But here’s novelist Nick Hornby’s commentary, very much to the point:

“Yes, yes, I know it’s easier to download music, and probably cheaper.  But what’s playing on your favourite download store when you walk into it?  Nothing.  Who are you going to meet in there?  Nobody.  Where are the notice boards offering flat shares and vacant slots in bands destined for superstardom?  Who’s going to tell you to stop listening to that and start listening to this?  Go ahead and save yourself a couple of quid.  The saving will cost you a career, a set of cool friends, musical taste and, eventually, your soul.  Record stores can’t save your life.  But they can give you a better one.”

I would disagree only with Hornby’s understatement: I think record stores did save my life, or, at least, they helped me find something that has continues to make me very happy. 

And he is also correct about the social context: a Jiffy bag with a CD from Amazon through the mail is a great thing, and I am delighted to receive one, but it just isn’t the same as visually eavesdropping on what the fellow in the next browser is looking at or (one afternoon in Dayton’s) getting yelled at my the cashier for making an insufficiently reverent remark about the late Bud Powell record he was playing.  Yesterdays, oh, yesterdays!

Thanks to Jim Eigo of Jazz Promo Services for Hornby’s exhortation.

A THREE-WEEK GIG

Jim Eigo (of Jazz Promo Services) sent this along — from 1973, by Stan Hunt in THE NEW YORKER: