Tag Archives: Joanna Sternberg

THE JOANNA STERNBERG TRIO with DAN BLOCK and JOE COHN: PART TWO (Sunny’s, Brooklyn, New York City, September 8, 2016)

joanna-sternberg-sept-8-2016-poster

The expression that comes to mind when I think of or hear this brand-new trio is an old-fashioned one, “Mighty nice.”  They are lyrical explorers, delving into old songs as if they were new, and Joanna’s new songs seem like old friends once we’re past the first chorus.

Here are the first four performances from that momentous debut at Sunny’s in far-off Red Hook.  Incidentally, Sunny’s is the second home of Miss Ida Blue, much beloved of JAZZ LIVES, and the Joanna Sternberg Trio — these three subtle shape-changers — will be back at Sunny’s on November 3, from 10 PM to 1 AM.  I can’t be there, because I’ll be at the Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party, so expect no videos — but it will give you more room to be there and savor the experience in person.

And here are four more beauties: two standards, two originals.  Delight in them, please.

The rollicking I GOT MINE by Frank Stokes:

THE TOUCH OF YOUR LIPS:

Joanna’s somber 3 / 4 opus, THE SONG:

HOW ABOUT YOU?

I like this trio a great deal.  How about you?

May your happiness increase!

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THE JOANNA STERNBERG TRIO with DAN BLOCK and JOE COHN: PART ONE (Sunny’s, Brooklyn, New York City, September 8, 2016)

joanna-sternberg-sept-8-2016-poster

I will let Joanna Sternberg — ace string bassist, singer, composer, guitarist, whimsical visual artist — introduce her new trio for herself . . . eloquently and naturally, as she does all else:

I am so thrilled and emotionally levitated to be singing and playing double bass in a trio with Joe Cohn on guitar, and Dan Block on tenor saxophone and clarinet. They are two musicians who share the same rare trait: nothing separates their minds, hearts and souls from their respective instruments. They provide selfless services to music on a daily basis.

Dan and Joe love, live and breathe music, whether they are playing a gig or walking down the street.  Every note is treated with appropriate attention and care in the correct “spirit of the song.”  Dan’s rich and warm (yet bright) tone is complimented by Joe’s sensitive and lively sound, as they gracefully listen to each other and draw inspiration from each other’s rhythm and note choices.

My job is to be selfless while gleefully listening to (and reacting to) them, and lay down a bed (or a carpet) of sound for them to play on, making every note they play sound “right” whether they choose to stay in the traditional chordal progressions, or impose new harmonies which are always creative and soulful and true to the spirit of the song.

I am honored to be playing music with them, and we hope to perform multiple times a month. We share a love and appreciation for the music of Billy Strayhorn, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Rodgers & Hart, George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, and Ray Noble among many others.

We hope to release a record this year, and do a concert performing the music and arrangements from “Moody Marilyn Moore.” This is an album featuring Joe Cohn’s mother Marilyn Moore singing, and Al Cohn (Joe’s dad) on tenor saxophone (and arrangements.)

When I “play” music with Dan and Joe, it is a form of concentrated play. I am having a lot of fun, while trying my best to focus on serving the music properly. In order to do this, I have to conceal some of my excitement so that my playing is not exactly how I feel (which is a mixture of butterflies inside, and deep gratitude.)

I am usually smiling the entire time, unless it is a heart-wrenching ballad.

-Joanna Sternberg
www.joannasternberg.com

ON THE ALAMO:

A FOGGY DAY:

THREE LITTLE WORDS:

I’VE GOT YOU UNDER MY SKIN (where Joanna takes her own decidedly un-Sinatra approach!):

More to come.  Finding this trio in their debut performance made the trip to Red Hook, Brooklyn (past the reach of the subway, any subway) rewarding.  And, yes, cabs go there.

May your happiness increase!

A LITTLE JAM AT THE EAR INN: DANNY TOBIAS, SCOTT ROBINSON, FELIX LEMERLE, JOANNA STERNBERG (Sunday, August 14, 2016)

EAR INN sign

Sometime in July 2017, the EarRegulars will celebrate ten straight years of improving the universe through swing on Sunday nights at The Ear Inn (that’s 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City).  One of the conventions of their collective frolics is that the first set is usually devoted to the quartet — most often led by Jon-Erik Kellso, with guitarist Matt Munisteri the most Regular of the EarRegulars.  The second set welcomes approved musical guests who are invited to join in.  Last Sunday, the “house band” was Jon-Erik, Scott Robinson on wondrous reeds and brass — Eb clarinet, Eb alto horn, tenor saxophone — Adam Moezinia, guitar; Rob Adkins, string bass.

For the final performance of the night, Felix Lemerle took Adam’s place (and borrowed his guitar), and Joanna Sternberg did the same with Rob’s string bass. Jon-Erik ceded the trumpet chair to our friend Danny Tobias, trumpet.  And this happened.

“The Ear.  So dear,” is what I think.  See you there some Sunday or another!

This post is dedicated to the Professor from Bahia, the source of many goodnesses.

May your happiness increase!

“AT THE BALL, THAT’S ALL!”: THE ARMISTICE BALL (Nov. 14, 2015)

at the ball, that's all

thus —Armistice Ball

The Armistice Ball is a wonderful new / old tradition, and I’m planning on being there this year. May I invite you to join me at the eighth annual Ball? This is their website with much information.  It takes place on a Saturday, in Morristown, New Jersey, from 8-11 PM.

As you can see by the photograph above, it is a truly vintage affair — music, attire, dance steps.  No hip-hop; no blue jeans; no shorts.  (A relief!) The Ball is focused on the world that once was, the world of 1910-20 — specifically time-travel to 1918, when the Great War ended.  There won’t be any influenza epidemic at the Ball, fortunately.

But there will be music, sweet and hot, provided and created by Dan Levinson, Mike Davis, Matt Musselman, John Landry, Jesse Gelber, Mike Kuehn, Joanna Sternberg, Sue Fischer — celebrating the music and dance of the World War One era.

Here is the Ball’s Facebook page (where lovely antiquity and current cyberspace meet and shake hands).

I’ve never been to the Ball, but I’ve always wanted to go . . . and so I encourage you to give yourself the pleasure of attending. And here is some music that will encourage you — and if you live too far from New Jersey, at least you can raise the volume (to a decorous level) and one-step around the kitchen with your Beau or your Belle.

Here are atmospheric videos from 2013 and 2014:

and

and

But don’t wait too long.  You’ll be humming this song instead of more joyous ones.

After the Ball

May your happiness increase!

DO YOU HAVE A JOB TO OFFER THESE YOUNG WOMEN?

WOMEN ON BENCH 1928 Paris

I know the economy is improving, but even the most gifted job applicants sometimes have trouble finding the work they seek. This distressing situation was dramatized in music by Tamar Korn, vocal; Craig Ventresco, guitar; Joanna Sternberg, string bass; Wanda Seeley, the Singing Pride of Bozeman, Montana –July 26, 2015, at Casa Mezcal on Orchard Street in New York City — through this song:

I'M AN UNEMPLOYED SWEETHEART

I imagine the scenario: the songwriters at their desk in the Brill Building, 1931:

“Look at this.  So many people unemployed.  But people don’t want to sing about that.  People want songs that make them forget their troubles.”

“Yeah, but how many songs can we write about moonlight on my canoe with you — when those poor slobs are hungry?”

“Wait.  I NEED A JOB IN LOVE.  No.  I NEED THE JOB OF BEING YOUR SWEETIE.”

“How about I NEED A JOB UNDER THE COVERS WITH YOU AND I’M A HARD WORKER“?

Long pause for cogitation and regrouping.

“How about I’M AN UNEMPLOYED SWEETHEART“?

And an obscure masterpiece — made famous by Lee Morse — was born.

Fortunately for us, the four people in the video have jobs that they do so splendidly.  We cherish them.

May your happiness increase!

 

ARE YOU LOST?: CRAIG VENTRESCO and JOANNA STERNBERG TEACH THE LESSON (July 26, 2015)

NY map

I’ve known Deacon Craig Ventresco for more than a decade now, and learned a great deal from his moral teachings at Bar Tabac, the Cajun, and other pulpits on both coasts.

CRAIG

But I’d never heard him deliver such a serious sermon on the dangers of being destabilized in the cosmos as I did on Sunday, July 26, 2015, at Casa Mezcal on Orchard Street (that’s the Lower East Side of New York City).  In his stern peroration, he was supported nobly by another great teacher, Joanna Sternberg (to be precise, Craig plays guitar and sings; Joanna accompanies him on the string bass).  In their efforts to uplift the community, they are assisted by members of the congregation Tamar Korn and Meredith Axelrod.  Heed the words of Deacon Ventresco.  Take them to heart:

The song was a 1908 hit for Bert Williams, composed by Chris Smith and Cecil Mack:

RIGHT CHURCH BUT THE WRONG PEW 1908Given the ubiquity of the GPS and the smartphone, to say nothing of those antiquities, paper maps . . . don’t let this happen to you.  And — if a less serious moral statement of mine may be permitted — I think Craig should sing more often. He has noble stories to impart to us.

May your happiness increase!

“DENNIS’ BASS”: NEAL MINER’S TRIBUTE TO DENNIS IRWIN AND HIS BASS

Not for bass faces only.

Neal Miner is not only a splendid string bassist; he’s a fine filmmaker and someone who finds stories worth telling everywhere he looks.  Even if you have only a small interest in jazz string bass playing, I think you will find this film entrancing in itself.

Anything observed closely is beautiful, Emerson said — here is living proof: a memorial to a great musician by the people who loved him, and a living embodiment of his spirit through the instrument that he made his own.

In order of appearance: the majestic string bassist Dennis Irwin (1951-2008); pianist Larry Goldings; drummer Matt Wilson; bassist / filmmaker Neal Miner; singer Aria Hendricks; Dennis’ American Standard plywood string bass; Neal’s student Joanna Sternberg; string bassist Mike Karn; singer Annie Ross; pianist Jon Weber; drummer Tony Jefferson; string bassists John Roche; Doug Weiss; Spencer Murphy; Stephanie Greig; sound engineer Jean-Pierre Remeaux; feline Remy Hendricks.