Tag Archives: JUMP Records

SEND JOE BOUGHTON SOME LOVE

The man in this photograph is listening intently.  He always does. 

Joe Boughton is a truly intent listener and serious jazz fan.  And more.   

His name will be familiar to many of my readers here and abroad.  Joe’s been producing records on the JUMP label for some years now, and has made it possible for the “Doctor Jazz” series of broadcasts on the Storyville label.  He’s also a devout collector of Hot Music — his idols being Johnny Windhurst, Ruby Braff, Bobby Hackett, Eddie Condon, Lou McGarity and the rest.  He loves those songs that have been unjustly forgotten — beautiful melodies. 

But Joe’s been one of those rare jazz-lovers who puts his energies (and money) where his passions are — by producing a series of jazz parties for more than twenty years — at Conneaut Lake and more recently at Chautauqua, New York.  I’ve been lucky enough to go to the Jazz at Chautauqua weekend parties since 2004 — and everything’s set for Jazz at Chautauqua 2010, September 16-19, 2010.  I’ll provide more details about that as soon as I know them.

But Joe’s in the hospital at the moment with some serious health issues. 

If you’ve ever heard and enjoyed one of the Storyville CDs, or one of the JUMP issues, or if you’ve been to one of Joe’s jazz parties, please send Joe an email or a card to help him along.  Friendly affection means so much when you’re feeling poorly.

Thanks, on behalf of Joe, his family, and the music he continues to foster – – –

Emails to Joe (in care of his son, Bill): bjboughton@aol.com        

To send cards or letters to Joe: 

Joe Boughton, c/o Sarah Holt,  401 Byllesby Ave.    Meadville, PA 16335.

And please pass the information along to your jazz friends.

ABE LINCOLN, SWASHBUCKLER

I have a special fondness for those musicians who never get their share of the limelight — not only Joe Thomas but also Frank Chace, Mike Burgevin, Cliff Leeman, Benny Morton, Shorty Baker, Rod Cless come to mind.  Abe%20Lincoln%20Masthead%20Image

It would be impossible to say who is most underrated or under-recognized, but trombonist Abe Lincoln is certainly a contender for Jazz’s Forgotten Man.  Although his astonishing playing enlivens many recordings — the late Thirties West Coast sessions that Bing Crosby and Hoagy Carmichael made with small jamming bands (often including Andy Secrest on cornet) and later sessions with the Rampart Street Paraders and Matty Matlock’s Paducah Patrol, he’s not well known.  I first heard him out in the open on a wondrous Bobby Hackett Capitol session, COAST CONCERT or COAST TO COAST, where Abe and Jack Teagarden stood side by side.  It wasn’t a cutting contest, but Abe’s joyous exuberance was more than a match for Big T. 

There are exceptions — cornetist Bob Barnard is a heroic one — but many jazz brassmen start their solos low and quiet, and work up to their higher registers for drama.  Abe Lincoln reminds me of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., leaping from a balcony, sword drawn.  There’s no shilly-shallying; Abe starts his solos with a whoop in his highest register and STAYS THERE.  He’s dazzling. 

I’m currently writing the liner notes for a forthcoming CD on the JUMP label (Joe Boughton’s cherished enterprise) which will feature a “Rampart Street Paraders” group in performance.  The venue was called “Storyville,” apparently located in San Francisco in the Sixties.  The band?  How about Billy Butterfield, Matty Matlock, Stan Wrightsman, Ray Leatherwood, Nick Fatool, and Abe Lincoln.  Looking for information in my discographies, I found sketches of Lincoln’s associations: the California Ramblers, Ozzie Nelson, Paul Whiteman, Roger Wolfe Kahn, West Coast radio and film work, soundtrack work for Walter Lanz Woody Woodpecker cartoons, even!

Then I did what has become common practice for researchers: I Googled “Abe Lincoln” “jazz” “trombone” — to separate him from that other Abe who split rails and ended the Civil War. 

And THIS came up — a whole website devoted to Abe: thorough, accurate, with photographs, articles, a discography, a video clip (!) and a biography:

http://www.abelincolntrombone.com/index.htm

It doesn’t make Abram Lincoln (not “Abraham,” by the way) a great deal more famous, but I applaud the site and bless the person who created it.  Check it out and enjoy Mister Lincoln.

GOODBYE, DAVE McKENNA, HAIL WAYNE WRIGHT

The extraordinary pianist Dave McKenna, who had been ill and unable to play for some time, died peacefully on October 18.  McKenna’s playing seemed to synthesize all the jazz piano that had come before him: the romping left-hand, both violent and precise, that summoned up the great stride players and the Boogie Woogie Trio at once — balanced against ricocheting treble lines that swerved and darted.  A McKenna solo in high gear (I think of his Chiaroscuro “C Jam Blues”) was a swinging juggernaut, but the McKenna locomotive was so smooth that the glasses of water in the dining room never sloshed.  He was a remarkable player who dazzled Oscar Peterson, and someone who had an immense affectionate recall for the best American popular songs, which he strung together in great thematic melodies (the Street medley, the Rain medley).  The Chiaroscuro, Shiah, Concord, and JUMP recordings he left behind — mostly solo, but some with Dick Johnson, Scott Hamilton, Ruby Braff, and Zoot Sims (not bad company) are imperishable.  And what more can anyone say about Dave except to recall that he was Bobby Hackett’s favorite pianist.

News also comes of a memorial service — with music, of course — celebrating the life of guitarist Wayne Wright.  Produced and organized by Chris Ambadjes of the American Guitar Museum, the concert will be held on Tuesday, November 11, 7:30-9:30 P.M, at Five Towns College in Dix Hills, New York. Center for Performing Arts – Main Stage. _