Tag Archives: Lynn Redmile

“NO ONE ELSE BUT YOU”: DANNY TOBIAS and MARK SHANE’S NEW CD

It’s just so good.

When Mark Shane told me that he had plans to record a CD session in duet with Danny Tobias, I was thrilled: a dream that I hadn’t imagined would come to be.  And it did, and the results are glorious.  I am taking it for granted that JAZZ LIVES readers know well who Mark and Danny are: if these names are new to you, please search them out on this very site.  I’ll wait until you get back.

Here is the link where you can hear sound samples, download the music or buy the disc.  I recommend all three actions!

And because I don’t recommend music I don’t like, you should know that I just about insisted on writing liner notes for this disc.  Instead of plain text, I offer them in Lynn Redmile’s delightful design:

and

May your happiness increase! 

MUSIC THAT FALLS KINDLY ON THE EAR: DANNY TOBIAS, JACK SAINT CLAIR, SILAS IRVINE, SAM HARRIS at the 1867 SANCTUARY (Ewing, New Jersey: April 6, 2019)

Some of the most memorable sessions — improvising without arrangements — are marked by a delightful ensemble tension coming out of competitiveness.  Think of almost any date Roy Eldridge played on, for an example close to hand.  Others are marked by an equally pleasing calm friendliness: we’re all here for the same purpose, and let’s have a good time.  A collective hug rather than head-cutting.

The quietly impressive group that Danny Tobias — master of various brass instruments — brought to the 1867 Sanctuary in Ewing, New Jersey, on Saturday, April 6, really exemplified the affectionate community of the second example.  Danny assembled very gifted young men from Philadelphia: reedman Jack Saint Clair, here solely on tenor; pianist Silas Irvine, and string bassist Sam Harris.  Here’s their sweet version of CHEROKEE — not at a racetrack tempo, but as a waltz:

And the Rodgers and Hart SPRING IS HERE, wistful, pensive, still swinging:

Danny’s secret indulgence (one that makes me particularly glad) is the Eb alto horn — beloved of Dick Cary and very few others.  This particular specimen, Danny notes, was a gift from his friend, the very fine trombonist Gil Toth, who was in the audience.  (Also in the audience were dance luminaries Lynn Redmile and Renee Toplansky.)

What better way to say “Thank you” to Gil and all of us than with this heartfelt rendition of SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER ME?

Every jazz concert needs a song with disputed authorship, so here’s DIG, a line on SWEET GEORGIA BROWN, that Miles Davis took credit for:

Even if your idea of paradise is King Oliver 1923, I hope you can hear the sweet floating beauties on display here.  And let’s not forget Jack Saint Clair’s melancholy-uplifting solo feature, posted earlier.

It was a wonderful afternoon at the 1867 Sanctuary — where art flourishes — and Danny, Jack, Silas, and Sam gave us great gifts.

May your happiness increase!

EMBRACED WARMLY BY MUSIC: DANNY TOBIAS, GEORGE RABBAI, PHIL ORR, PAT MERCURI, JOE PLOWMAN (Part Three): March 24, 2018

THIS JUST  IN: Danny and George will be back at the 1867 Sanctuary on Saturday, September 22, from 2-4 PM.  Mark it down.)

Here are the closing performances — the second set — from a lovely afternoon of rewarding music.  Those who missed the first two segments may savor them here.


That picture gives all the needed details, but it can’t convey the genial loving spirit that animated the music: friendly conversations among players who deeply respect and value each other, on and off the bandstand.  And you would have to be at the 1867 Sanctuary to hear how fully it welcomes creativity.

A feature for the rhythm section, led by the lyrical Mr. Plowman — from GUYS AND DOLLS:

The great Fifties Basie groove on a composition by Freddie Green:

Danny’s romp on familiar chord changes (test yourself!) which is also the title of his latest CD, COMPLETE ABANDON:

Danny’s feature — THESE FOOLISH THINGS — on his special new / old cornet:

A gorgeous bouquet of sound, scored for two fluegelhorns, EMILY:

And the brief closing selection, IT’S YOU OR NO ONE:

What wonders!  I believe that Danny and George have talked of doing another afternoon performance at the unique 1867 Sanctuary and I hope this comes to fruition soon.  All I can tell you is that I left the address in my car’s GPS and I will keep it there.  “Worth a trip from anywhere!” as a radio commercial used to tell us.  Thank you, Danny, George, Joe, Phil, Pat, Bob and Helen Kull, Caroline Roth, Lynn Redmile, and everyone else who made this possible.

May your happiness increase!

A SANCTUARY FOR MUSIC: DANNY TOBIAS, JOE HOLT, and MAX DONALDSON (Ewing, New Jersey: June 11, 2017)

Beautiful music doesn’t always get a suitable place to grow and shine, but on June 11, 2017, it did, for a few hours.

The place is the  1867 Sanctuary at Ewing at 101 Scotch Road in Ewing, New Jersey, and the lovely music was created by Danny Tobias (trumpet, Eb alto horn), Joe Holt (piano), and guest Max Donaldson (tenor saxophone).  Here are several of the highlights of that most rewarding concert.

Think of Fred and Ginger, or of Ella and Louis — but let us all bow low to Irving Berlin, without whom we’d have no CHEEK TO CHEEK:

For ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE, Danny invited up young Mister Max Donaldson, who certainly played splendidly.  Max told me, “I am a 17 year old junior in high school and have been playing saxophone since the 5th grade. I discovered jazz in the 7th grade and found my passion. Some of my favorite jazz greats to listen to are Dexter Gordon, Benny Golson, and Sonny Rollins, though I listen to and appreciate all types of jazz.”  Watch out for this young man: I predict a creative future for him.

For his first feature, Joe chose to improvise on Beethoven’s Minuet in G Major, WoO 10, No. 2.  To which I could only say (under my breath, politely), “WoO!”:

Here’s Danny’s own romping variations on a jazz classic, which he has titled HOW’S IT GO?:

Danny has picked up another brass horn, the neglected but beautiful Eb alto horn — think of Dick Cary and Scott Robinson — and here the duo improvises a BLUES FOR MAX in honor of their tenorman:

Holt meets Joplin, with happiness, for MAPLE LEAF RAG:

And finally, Richard Rodgers – Lorenz Hart’s moody SPRING IS HERE, a song Joe hadn’t known before — how beautifully he finds his way:

Gorgeous music in a serenely beautiful place.  Thanks to Danny, Joe, Max, Lynn Redmile, and to Bob Kull for making this all happy and possible.

May your happiness increase!

DANNY TOBIAS MAKES BEAUTIFUL MUSIC: “COMPLETE ABANDON”

Photograph by Lynn Redmile

Photograph by Lynn Redmile

One of the quietest of my heroes, lyrical brassman Danny Tobias, has a new CD.  It’s called COMPLETE ABANDON — but don’t panic, for it’s not a free-jazz bacchanal.  It could have been called COMPLETE WARMTH just as well. And it’s new in several ways: recorded before a live audience — although a very serene one — just last September, in the 1867 Sanctuary in Ewing, New Jersey.

dannytobiasquintetThe CD presents a small group, captured with beautiful sound (thanks to Robert Bullington) “playing tunes,” always lyrical and always swinging.  The cover photograph here is small, but the music is endearingly expansive.  (Lynn Redmile, Danny’s very talented wife, took the photo of Mister T. at the top and designed the whole CD’s artwork.)

Danny is heard not only on trumpet, but also on the Eb alto horn (think of Dick Cary) and a light-hearted vocal on LOVE IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER.  He’s joined by his New Jersey friends, the very pleasing fellows Joe Holt, piano; Paul Midiri, vibraphone; Joe Plowman, string bass; Jim Lawlor, drums.  And both in conception and recorded sound, this disc is that rarity — an accurate reflection of what musicians in a comfortable setting sound like.  The tunes are I WANT TO BE HAPPY; DANCING ON THE CEILING; MY ROMANCE; LOTUS BLOSSOM; COMPLETE ABANDON; THE VERY THOUGHT OF YOU; THIS CAN’T BE LOVE; LOVE IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER; I’M CONFESSIN’; EVERYBODY LOVES MY BABY; GIVE ME HE SIMPLE LIFE; THESE FOOLISH THINGS; PICK YOURSELF UP.

You can tell something about Danny’s musical orientations through the song titles: a fondness for melodies, a delight in compositions.  He isn’t someone who needs to put out a CD of “originals”; rather, he trusts Vincent Youmans, Billy Strayhorn, Richard Rodgers.  He believes in Count Basie, Bing Crosby, and Louis Armstrong, whether they are being joyous or melancholy.  Danny has traveled long and happily in the sacred land of Medium Tempo, and he knows its most beautiful spots.

When I first met Danny — hearing and seeing him on the stand without having had the opportunity to talk with him (this was a decade ago, thanks to Kevin Dorn and the Traditional Jazz Collective at the Cajun) I delighted in the first set, and when he came off the stand, I introduced myself, and said, “Young man, you’ve been listening to Ruby Braff and Buck Clayton,” and young Mister Tobias heard and was gracious about the compliment.

Since then, I’ve understood that Danny has internalized the great swing players in his own fashion — I’m not the only one to hear Joe Thomas in his work — without fuss and without self-indulgence.  He doesn’t call attention to himself by volume or technique.  Rather, to use the cliche that is true, “He sings on that horn,” which is not at all easy.

Danny’s colleagues are, as I wrote above, his pals, so the CD has the easy communal feel of a group of long-time friends getting together: no competition, no vying for space, but the pleased kindness of musicians who are more interested in the band than in their own solos.  The vibraphone on this disc, expertly and calmly played by Paul Midiri, at times lends the session a George Shearing Quintet feel, reminding me of some Bobby Hackett or Ruby Braff sessions with a similar personnel.  And Messrs. Lawlor, Plowman, and Holt are generous swinging folks — catch Joe Holt’s feature on GIVE ME THE SIMPLE LIFE.

To purchase the CD and hear sound samples, visit here.  Or you can go directly to Danny’s website — where you can also enjoy videos of Danny in a variety of contexts.

CDBaby, not always the most accurate guide to musical aesthetics, offers this assessment: “Recommended if you like Bobby Hackett, Louis Armstrong, Warren Vache.”  I couldn’t agree more.  And I’m grateful that the forces of time, place, economics, and art came together to make this disc possible.  It is seriously rewarding, and it doesn’t get stale after one playing.

May your happiness increase!

COME TO PHILLY FOR JOY: MARTY GROSZ, DANNY TOBIAS, DAN BLOCK, BRIAN NALEPKA (Sept. 25, 2016)

I’m going to be in New Orleans on the night of September 25, otherwise I’d be here.  And with me absent, there will be one, perhaps two empty seats.  Do you need any more inducement?

"Tell us a story, Mister Grosz!" Photo by Lynn Redmile

“Tell us a story, Mister Grosz!” Photo by Lynn Redmile

Oh, yes.  It will be a concert — hugely informal, of course — by Marty Grosz, guitar / vocals / badinage / vaudeville; Danny Tobias, cornet; Dan Block, reeds, Brian Nalepka, string bass.  “Four of the best,” as they used to say in English boarding schools.  The host will be Philadelphia guitarist Barry Waharhaftig, leader of the Hot Club of Philadelphia.

Here’s three of the four heroes, with a typical Grosz free-association interlude, from 2013.  It was terribly dark at the Mermaid Inn, but we could still hear Marty, Danny, Dan, and Ed Wise, string bass:

I would point out, most gently, that Marty is now 86.  (And I don’t mean “86” in the bartending sense, but his chronological age.)  So the race is to those who do not delay.

Marty and his friends will be appearing on Sunday, September 25, from 8-10:30 PM.  The jollities will take place at the Venetian Club Ballroom, 8030 Germantown Avenue, in Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, under the swinging aegis of Barry Waharhaftig and the Hot Club of Philadelphis.  Tickets are $20, with 5% going to the Weavers Way Food Co-op “Food Moxie” Program.

For tickets, visit http://MartyGrosz-Quartet.BPT.me.  For further information, contact Barry Wahrhaftig at 215-380-2588 or HotClubPhilly@gmail.com.

May your happiness increase!

PUREBREDS AT THE EAR INN (2016 and 2012)

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Thanks to photographer / chronicler Lynn Redmile, we have this shining example of what happens at The Ear Inn, 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City, on Sunday nights, because of the EarRegulars — and what happened on January 18, 2016.  The text for this mellow sermon is Handy’s YELLOW DOG BLUES.  Lynn explains, “Each Sunday, at the historic Ear Inn on Spring Street, NYC, the EarRegulars play some of the coolest hot jazz, with a rotating lineup of musicians in their quartet, often joined by others in a jam session. This session featured founder Jon-Erik Kellso (trumpet), co-founder Matt Munisteri (guitar), Evan Arntzen (reeds) and Neal Miner (bass) and joined by Danny Tobias (trumpet), Mike Davis (cornet), Balázs Szalóky (trumpet) and Paul Brandenberg (cornet).”

That’s enough to make anyone howl.

When one DOG isn’t enough . . . let us return to those halcyon days of yore, specifically September 16, 2012, when I had a video camera ready for the closing song of a Sunday evening, when the original quartet was Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet; Harry Allen, tenor saxophone; Chris Flory, guitar; Neal Miner, string bass. As the evening progressed, the Friends came in: Pete and Will Anderson, Dan Block, Alex Hoffman, saxophone; Eli Preminger, Danny Tobias, trumpet; Doug Finke, trombone.

Remarkable — but just another example of the ordinary magic that happens on Sunday nights at The Ear.

And perhaps not by coincidence, the Westminster Dog Show is coming to New York City on February 15 and 16, 2016.  Will this mean there will be more sitting-in at The Ear Inn, or sitting down, or sitting and staying? We’ll see.  I’ll ask my authority on such matters, Brynn White.

“Barry!  Treats for everyone!”

May your happiness increase!