Tag Archives: Manu Hagmann

THE BACKBONE OF JAZZ: MATTHIAS SEUFFERT and FRIENDS at WHITLEY BAY 2012 (October 28, 2012)

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Count Basie and his musicians taught us so much by their example.

Swing is at the heart of everything.  Jazz is music for dancers, and it has to have an intense but light rhythmic impulse, an irresistible flowing motion. The blues are essential.  Simplicity is key even to the most elaborate improvisations.  Fewer notes have greater effect.  You can improvise on I GOT RHYTHM until the end of time.  Music, like its players and singers, has to have a living, breathing pulse.

(The grammarians in my audience will note I am using the present tense, intentionally.  Basie’s truths are still truths.)

The superb reedman / composer / arranger Matthias Seuffert put together a small band for the 2012 Whitley Bay Jazz Party and offered us his evocative originals in the style of / paying tribute to the great figures of jazz — Bix, Louis, Duke, Benny, Hawkins, and a few others: click here to enjoy these brilliant tributes.

I saved his homage to Basie, BACKBONE BASIE, for last — accomplished with the inestimable aid of Martin Litton, piano; Martin Wheatley, guitar; Manu Hagmann, string bass; Josh Duffee, drums; Matthias and Jean-Francois Bonnel, reeds; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Enrico Tomasso, trumpet:

Thank you, Matthias and friends, and thank you, Mike Durham.  As always!

May your happiness increase! 

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THIS ONE’S FOR PATTI: SWEET MUSIC FROM THE 2012 WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY

If you know anything about the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party (formerly known as the Whitley Bay International Jazz Festival) you can’t help being fond of and admiring Patti Durham.  She continues to be a loving presence, a truly dear friend to many people.  So “this one’s for Patti”: one of her favorite songs, performed at the 2012 Party.

GUILTY is one of those pretty, emotive early-Thirties ballads associated with Al Bowlly.  Here, it’s performed by the emotionally compelling (and always swinging) Spats Langham, vocal and guitar; Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Jens Lindgren, trombone; Emma Fisk, violin; Norman Field, reeds; Martin Litton, piano;  Manu Hagmann, string bass; Richard Pite, drums.  And as the performance goes along, I always imagine a meeting of Bowlly with a mid-Thirties Teddy Wilson band . . . an alternate universe in the Brunswick studios, where sweet meets swing:

Thank you, dear Patti, for inspiring us in so many ways.

May your happiness increase!

ON MY WAY / TO WHITLEY BAY / WHERE GOOD TIMES ARE PLENTIFUL

Feel free to join in with my new song — doggerel created to the tune of Harry Belafonte’s JAMAICA FAREWELL: “I’m on me way / to Whitley Bay / won’t be back / till late Monday / I’m all excit’ / Won’t miss my flight / I know I’ll have a time / at Whitley Bay.”

Obviously, I have no reputation as a composer of calypso.

The omens and portents are much more favorable today than they were in 2012.  That trip that began with this weary traveler leaving his passport at home and making a costly racing roundtrip to retrieve it. The glorious jazz weekend ended with Superstorm Sandy and its global effects.   Of course, in both cases, I was helped immensely by generous strangers (at British Airways) and swing friends.

But Whitley Bay — now the Classic Jazz Party, formerly the International Jazz Festival — has been a special place since my first visit in 2009. There I met and admired Bent Persson, Aurelie Tropez, Nick Ward, Jacob Ullberger, Matthias Seuffert, Emma Fisk, Frans Sjostrom, Norman Field, and two dozen others. There I basked in the wit and generosity of the late Mike Durham, who still remains a vivid presence. I will be looking around corners for him all weekend long.  And this year the visiting Americans aren’t so bad, either: Andy Schumm, Josh Duffee, Duke Heitger, Jeff Barnhart, Daryl Sherman.

This year’s party offers exciting thematic presentations: the music of Coon-Sanders, early Ellington, Mildred Bailey, Lee Wiley, Basie 1937, Johnny Dodds, Eddie South and Stuff Smith, rare Bix, rare Fats, California Ramblers, and more.  My camera batteries are charged and I feel the same way.

I wish I could sweep you all along with me, but the airlines are fussy about bringing unscheduled guests.  So I hope JAZZ LIVES readers have patience: I will video-record as much as possible, and subject to musicians’ approval, you will see much of it in the months to come.

I expect to be busy listening, recording, talking and hanging out — living life away from the computer — so if this blog seems quiet for this long weekend, don’t feel abandoned. I am simply gathering new material for your pleasure.

I don’t anticipate think that any of my readers has sufficient frequent flyer miles to jump on a plane right this minute, but “day tickets” are still available, £50 a day.  Details here.  But you’d have to be fairly close to Newcastle to make this possible.  (On a whim, I checked Expedia for round-trip from New York and the least expensive flight was $1500.)

By the time some of you read this, I will already be on a Delta flight to Newcastle by way of Amsterdam . . . a jazz pilgrim on one of the great pilgrimages, bearing notebook and camera, CDs and snacks, clothing, pills, and an umbrella — instead of a scallop shell.

See you back at the ranch on Tuesday, November 5!

Here’s a little music from the 2012 Party, a video of mine that has not been made public before, to lift up your spirits and embody what the weekend is all about.  Rene Hagmann, cornet; Jean-Francois Bonnel, clarinet; Roly Veitch, guitar; Manu Hagmann, string bass, performing THAT’S A-PLENTY in hono(u)r of the Bechet-Spanier Big Four. My feelings exactly.

May your happiness increase!

“LIVE SPORT”: A JAM SESSION AFTER HOURS IN THE VICTORY PUB, NEWCASTLE (Oct. 28-29, 2012) with the STARS of THE WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY

Once more . . . if “Mister Mike” isn’t someone recognizable to you, would you kindly take a minute and read this?  It would mean a great deal to many people, and, to paraphrase Dizzy Gillespie, “No him, no this.”

“This” turns out to be my video record of the closing notes of the 2012 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party — a jam session on Sunday night held in the Victory Pub of the Village Newcastle.  Some of the details are indistinct — I would have made a very bad spy — because a video camera, even on a tripod, is an ungainly dance partner.  I wrote down personnels on the back of two JAZZ LIVES cards, which have now vanished into that place where Things That Vanish go.  So if I’ve left out the name of a noble participant, email me at swingyoucats@gmail.com. and tell me.

Or you can simply observe musicians brilliantly at play in the dark.

LONESOME BLUES (from the Hot Five book) Thomas Winteler, soprano saxophone; Frans Sjostrom, bass saxophone; Martin Litton, keyboard — he deserves a grand piano! — ; Roly Veitch, guitar; Josh Duffee, drums):

AFTER YOU’VE GONE (Thomas Winteler, soprano saxophone; Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Frans Sjostrom, bass saxophone; Martin Litton, keyboard; Martin Wheatley, guitar; Josh Duffee, drums):

I NEVER KNEW Andy Schumm, cornet; Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Jens Lindgren, trombone; Thomas Winteler, Michael McQuaid, Norman Field, reeds; Martin Wheatley, guitar; Frans Sjostrom, bass saxophone, and others):   

ONCE IN A WHILE (for Louis and the Hot Five — performed by Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Jens Lindgren, trombone; Thomas Winteler, Michael McQuaid, Norman Field, reeds; Spats Langham, guitar; Manu Hagmann, bass; Josh Duffee, drums, and others):

MY MELANCHOLY BABY (traditionally the dreaded request by inebriated patrons in the bar, but Spats Langham turns it into a masterpiece of tender swing here, aided by Andy Schumm, cornet; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Henri Lemaire, string bass; Matthias Seuffert, tenor saxophone; Michael McQuaid, alto saxophone, Josh Duffee, drums. The admiring watchers include Frans Sjostrom, Martin Wheatley, Stephane Gillot):

I SAW STARS (which I associate with the 1934 debut of Django and Stephane on Ultraphone — here rendered with sweet fervor by Roly Veitch, guitar / vocal; Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Matthias Seuffert, Michael McQuaid, reeds; Alistair Allan, trombone; Henri Lemaire, string bass; Josh Duffee, drums):

Then, as if by magic, the scene shifted . . . suddenly it was 1941; we were at Minton’s (or someplace north of 125th Street in Harlem, New York City; I had turned into Jerry Newman, recording swing-to-bop for posterity . . . you’ll hear what I mean.

LESTER LEAPS IN (Martin Litton, keyboard; Michael McQuaid, alto saxophone; Rico Tomasso, Andy Schumm, trumpet; Matthias Seuffert, tenor saxophone; Alistair Allan, trombone; Martin Wheatley, Roly Veitch, guitar; Manu Hagmann, string bass; Josh Duffee, drums):

TOPSY (Martin Litton, keyboard; Michael McQuaid, alto saxophone; Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Matthias Seuffert, tenor saxophone; Alistair Allan, trombone; Martin Wheatley, Roly Veitch, guitar; Manu Hagmann, string bass; Josh Duffee, drums):

After those last notes had stopped echoing, I (and some others) made our weary, happy way to bed . . . rocking gently on what we had heard, dreaming sweetly of the 2013 Party.

For Mister Mike.

And, as always, tickets are on sale to the 2013 Party, the best-organized high-spirited living jazz museum, here.

May your happiness increase.

“FORTY YEARS OF JAZZ”: MATTHIAS SEUFFERT, ORIGINAL THINKER — at the 2012 WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY (October 28, 2012)

Many of the most admired jazz improvisers don’t sit down and “compose” music on manuscript paper; rather, they invent new compositions on the spot while playing.

The reed master Matthias Seuffert is a heartening exception, and this set at the 2012 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, “Forty Years of Jazz,” allowed him to show off more of his considerable talents.  The premise was remarkable in itself: Matthias presented original compositions that evoked the first four decades of jazz and paid tribute to the great figures.

The set also displayed the marvelous professionalism of the players, for I suspect that some of them were seeing these scores for the second time in their lives.  The music would have been more polished had there been several long rehearsals, but it exuberantly got to the heart of things.

The players are Matthias, reeds and a surprise vocal; Rico Tomasso, trumpet; Jean-Francois Bonnel, reeds; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Martin Litton, piano; Martin Wheatley, guitar; Manu Hagmann, string bass; Josh Duffee, drums.

For Louis and Earl, circa 1928 — SATCHELMOUTH STRUT:

Mr. Beiderbecke, meet Mr. Trumbauer — TAKE A TRAM TO BIXVILLE:

For Fats Waller and his Rhythm — a special tribute to Mike Durham, the generous genius of the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, with a heartfelt vocal by Matthias — WHERE WOULD WE BE WITHOUT YOU?:

The one, the only Coleman Hawkins — FOR THE BEAN (or TO FATHER BEAN):

Ditto for Edward Kennedy Ellington — SOPHISTICATED EDDIE:

For BG, Teddy, and Gene — OPUS 5/6 or 7/8:

And a mid-Forties reconsideration of “I’M COMIN’ VIRGINIA,” in which she definitely has a new outfit — VIRGINIA BOP:

What an imagination!

May your happiness increase.

MR. LANGHAM CELEBRATES MR. BOWLLY at WHITLEY BAY: ENRICO TOMASSO, JENS LINDGREN, NORMAN FIELD, EMMA FISK, MARTIN LITTON, MANU HAGMANN, RICHARD PITE (Oct. 27, 2012)

Al Bowlly was a memorable singer and guitarist.  Thomas “Spats” Langham is a memorable singer and guitarist.  Does anyone see a pattern here?

The musical connections were warmly evident at the 2012 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, when Spats took to the little bandstand to celebrate Al — with the best friendly assistance from Enrico Tomasso, trumpet; Jens Lindgren, trombone; Norman Field, reeds; Emma Fisk, violin; Martin Litton, piano; Manu Hagmann, string bass; Richard Pite, drums.

Spats crooned sweetly, earnestly, and with lovely humor — and the band rocked or serenaded around him.  On the first tune (and others) I thought, “My goodness, this is how Al Bowlly might have sounded if he had ended up in the (U.S.) Brunswick Records studios in 1936 with a Teddy Wilson small band,” and the combination was inspiring.

GOT A DATE WITH AN ANGEL:

THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN:

THE VERY THOUGHT OF YOU (oh, so sweet):

MY SWEET VIRGINIA:

BROTHER, CAN YOU SPARE A DIME? (Readers, I apologize for the missing eight bars at the end.  It is possible that unintentionally shut the camera off because I was trying too hard to hold back tears, and I am serious):

One other selection, performed beautifully, GUILTY, will show up in another form.  Immensely touching music.

I write this post with my father in mind.  Born in 1915, this was his music — and I learned the lyrics to BROTHER from him, very early.  He would have admired Spats very much.

May your happiness increase.

FOUR OR FIVE TIMES: THE BONNEL-HAGMANN BIG FOUR (RENE HAGMANN, JEAN-FRANCOIS BONNEL, MANU HAGMANN, ROLY VEITCH) at WHITLEY BAY 2012

BECHET SPANIER

I think many people who love jazz would agree that the 1940 sessions that brought together Sidney Bechet, Muggsy Spanier, Carmen Mastren, and Wellman Braud are a summation of what hot improvised music could be — easy yet intense, full of ensemble variations and surprises but leaving great open stretches for dramatic solos, four individualists jostling for space but working sweetly together as a cohesive community of sound and feeling.  The HRS records have been emulated with some success in this century (one memorable effort paired Jon-Erik Kellso and Bob Wilber one morning at Jazz at Chautauqua) — but one delicious evocation and tribute happened just a few months ago at the 2012 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party.  The participants were Rene Hagmann, blowing mightily on cornet; Jean-Francois Bonnel on soprano saxophone and clarinet; Manu Hagmann on string bass; Roly Veitch on guitar.  Here are five truly inspiring performances — with some of the original details intact, but not repertory copies (at times, Rene leans much more towards Cootie Williams than Muggsy, to great effect) — stylish, fervent, and hot.

SWEET SUE:

LAZY RIVER:

FOUR OR FIVE TIMES:

SWEET LORRAINE:

CHINA BOY:

Heartwarming hot jazz!  (And there was a Bonnel-Hagmann Big Four performance of THAT’S A-PLENTY, which is being held in a safe place.  Details to come.)

May your happiness increase.