Tag Archives: master class

ONE LAST FOUR-BAR BREAK: A WORKSHOP and A WEEKEND (Sept. 16-20 / 20-23, 2012)

In case you’re an amateur or proficient jazz musician or singer with leanings towards the classic repertoire and a desire to study with the Masters, don’t let this opportunity slip by.  A few days from now, the first Jazz at Chautauqua Traditional Jazz Workshop will begin . . .where musicians can study with Duke Heitger, Dan Barrett, Scott Robinson, Rossano Sportiello, Howard Alden, Kerry Lewis, Ricky Malichi, and Rebecca Kilgore.  Students get 30% off our Jazz Workshop and free lodging.  Here’s  a new video about the Workshop.  And after the Workshop concludes, the 15th annual Jazz at Chautauqua party begins.  For information on both events, click here.  These two events are rare birds — and they need the support of listeners young and older and musicians likewise.

I’ve just learned that Jazz at Chautauqua has extended a few scholarships to exceptional college music students and to a member of a great local organization, Infinity Visual and Performing Arts, Inc., which “creates and sustains an environment in which young people, based solely on their desire to participate, can grow, learn, and lead through participation in the visual and performing arts.”  (Visit them here.)

Many jazz fans and writers lament the aging, shrinking audience.  Instead of cursing the greyness, why not send your niece or nephew, your granddaughter who’s starting the string bass or your stepson who yearns to play trombone better . . . to the Workshop and the Weekend?  The young folks will thank you, and in the long run, so will the music.

(I am aware that to many readers this appeal might sound like a broken OKeh, and that many people — for reasons of distance, health, or finances — find any version of the above impossible.  I apologize to them.  But if one out of a hundred people who say, “Young people don’t come to jazz parties” did something about it, the median age — and health — would be changed remarkably.  Didn’t Eleanor Roosevelt say, “Better to enjoy SHIM-ME-SHA-WABBLE in person than to curse the fact that the Commodore Music Shop is closed“?  I might have the quotation a little wrong, but you get the idea.)

May your happiness increase.

FLOATING: A MASTER CLASS (The Ear Inn, Nov. 8, 2010)

NPR wasn’t there.  PBS was off covering something else.  Too bad for them.

But last Sunday night, The EarRegulars offered a master class at The Ear Inn.  Anyone could attend. 

Their subject?  Duke Ellington called it “bouncing buoyancy,” his definition for the irresistible levitation that swinging jazz could produce.  I call it floating — the deep mastery of rhythm, line, and invention that one hears in Louis, Lester, Benny Carter, Jack Teagarden, Jo Jones, Teddy Wilson, Sidney Catlett, and on and on. 

The audience at The Ear Inn (326 Spring Street in Soho, New York City) may not have known what they were hearing, but I am sure it was absorbed osmotically into their very cells.   

And who are these masters, teaching by example?  The co-founders of The EarRegulars, Jon-Erik Kellso and Matt Munisteri, on trumpet and guitar, joined by bassist Neal Miner and someone I’d only heard about, tenor saxophonist Alex Hoffman, a young man who’s already playing splendidly.  (Look him up at http://www.alexhoffman.com.) 

Later in the evening a whole reed section dropped by, one by one: Andy Faber, tenor; Dan Block, alto; Pete Martinez, clarinet.

Here are a few highlights.  Check yourself to find that you’re still touching the chair seat:

I THOUGHT ABOUT YOU, that pretty rhythm ballad — most of us know it as “I TOOK A TRIP ON A TRAIN,” and so on:

MY WALKING STICK is a wonderful minor-rock with the best pedigree — an Irving Berlin song recorded once by Louis Armstrong and the Mills Brothers, then, forty years later, by Ruby Braff and Ellis Larkins.  This version is the twenty-first century’s delightful continuation, with Professor Kellso walking with his plunger mute:

Another pretty song that rarely gets played is UNDER A BLANKET OF BLUE — the ballad Frank Chace loved.  I know it from versions by Louis, Hawkins, and Connee Boswell, not a meek triumvirate:

Caffeine always helps focus and energize, as does this version of TEA FOR TWO, with Andy Farber joining in.  I don’t quite understand the initial standing-up-and-sitting-down, but perhaps it was The EarRegulars Remember Jimmie Lunceford:

How about some blues?  Better yet, how about a greasy Gene Ammons blues?  Here’s RED TOP, Dan Block leaping in (top right).  Matt Munisteri’s dark excavations made me think of Tiny Grimes, but Matt goes beyond the Master here:

And here’s the rocking conclusion:

Finally, those singers and players who take on HOW AM I TO KNOW often do it at the Billie Holiday Commodore tempo, stretching out the long notes.  But it works even better as a medium-tempo romper: Pete Martinez, seated on a barstool to my left, adds his particular tart flavorings:

And the final tasty minute and twenty-six seconds:

Seminars held every Sunday, 8 – 11 PM . . . no course prerequisites!