Tag Archives: Matt Garrity

ORIGINALS BY ONE: JOEL FORRESTER, MICHAEL IRWIN, MICHI FUJI, DAVE HOFSTRA, MATT GARRITY at CLEOPATRA’S NEEDLE (August 3, 2017)

“I’m Joel, and these are my tunes,” is the way pianist-composer-bandleader Joel Forrester might announce himself at the start of an evening.

JOEL FORRESTER, photograph by Metin Oner

He isn’t pugnacious in the way some musicians are, who assertively say that they are going to play their compositions all night long.  No, Joel says it quietly, mixing a wry offhandedness with just a touch of pride.  “Here are my children, and I like them myself, but you needn’t.  However, no substitutions are allowed, no ordering off the aesthetic menu.”  His quiet statement tells us that the pianist and the composer really occupy the same space, seamlessly mingled.

I was at one of Joel’s gigs where a woman — pleasantly but forcefully — told Joel that she wanted to hear him play TAKE THE “A” TRAIN.  Joel politely said no, and the woman, undeterred, pressed: didn’t he know it?  Joel played the first few bars of the famous introduction to show that his was a choice, not an inadequacy, and then politely explained to the listener that one of the reasons he had this particular gig was that he wouldn’t be obligated to play “A” TRAIN.  I don’t think the woman understood the distinction, but she stopped interrogating the pianist-composer.

Here are several of Joel’s “tunes” — more than that to my ears — as he performed them on August 3, 2017, at Cleopatra’s Needle, which occupies its own original space around Broadway and 95th Street.  The Players are Michi Fuji, violin; Michael Irwin, trumpet; Dave Hofstra, string bass; Matt Garrity, drums.  In form and in performance, Joel’s creations don’t contain cliches, nor do they inspire them.

Incidentally, a serious Joel-alert: he will be at Cleo’s on Thursday, October 19, 7-11, with bassist Hofstra and drummer Garrity, with Irwin coming by and even tenor saxophonist Vito Dieterle.  I will be sans camera for once, I think, so you will have to make the scene on your own.

But back to the August revelry and reverie, with three selections: KIRSTEN’S NEW MAMBO, YOUR MOVE, and a melding of FLIP FLOP and a very slow NO QUESTION.  This is music you could pensively, happily get lost in. I’ve retained Joel’s banter with the audience because it is part of the presentation, verbal preludes to the music.

A mambo (when was the last time you heard one) for the mysteriously inspiring Kirsten.  Explication du texte from Joel:

K’S NEW MAMBO, written for the Chicago wedding of my son’s best friend, caused Henny Youngman to exclaim, “Forrester, you got a hit on yer hands!” forgetting that he’d said that about an earlier tune of mine.

and a tune featuring Michi Fuji, YOUR MOVE.  Of this performance, Joel says, “Michi Fuji really hears it!”

A set-closing combination, FLIP FLOP, featuring Dave Hofstra, and Joel’s “break tune,” performed with new slowness, NO QUESTION.

FLIP FLOP arose out of a high school desire to pen a tune like OLEO or BILLIE’S BOUNCE: i.e., one that bites its own tail.  NO QUESTION has long been my break tune. It was dedicated to David Sutter of the band Fish ‘n’ Roses (and Creed Taylor’s biographer). Denis Charles used to tell people, “It’s a riff on Monk’s ‘Rhythm-changes.” As indeed it is:

Not the usual, and I am among others who celebrate that.  And I hope to see the Faithful at Cleopatra’s Needle on the 19th.

May your happiness increase!

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WITH TENDERNESS: THEN, NOW, SOON (JOEL FORRESTER, VITO DIETERLE, MATT GARRITY, DAVE HOFSTRA)

JOEL FORRESTER, photograph by Metin Oner

Some more music from my hero Joel Forrester, captured live at Cleopatra’s Needle on August 3, 2017, which is the THEN of the title.  Joel brought with him Vito Dieterle, tenor saxophone; Dave Hofstra, string bass; Matt Garrity, drums (and other noble participants, their identities to be revealed in future JAZZ LIVES’ posts).

Two selections struck me most strongly as wordless evocations of tenderness, overlaid with grief.  The first, YOUR LITTLE DOG, Joel’s elegy for a beloved pet, is incomplete: I arrived late to this Musical Offering and the quartet was taking its leisurely melancholy route through this composition, one of Joel’s that is most dear to me. Here is the closing minute.  I wish I’d arrived earlier, but this minute-plus remains emotionally powerful:

Later in the evening, Joel and the quartet offered a slow ballad, ABOUT FRANCOISE, which has much of the same mood:

I’ve lingered over these two performances because they present a sound, a mood, a tempo that I don’t always encounter, in a world where some musicians feel pressured to be brighter, quicker, more attention-getting.  Joel and friends know that music that mourns can also elate and uplift, and I hope you feel those emotions here.

That was THEN, as they say.  The NOW is, of course, the minutes you are spending absorbing the sounds.

SOON is not yet here as I write this, but it will come  . . .  you know the rest.

Joel, Vito, and Dave have a new trio gig in Riverdale, New York, this coming Sunday, which is September 10, from 3 to 7 PM, at MON AMOUR, a coffee-and-wine cafe at 234 West 238th Street, two doors to the east of Broadway.  Take the #1 train to 238 (its penultimate station stop) and you are THERE. No cover or music charge. 

And Joel has promised me a full version of YOUR LITTLE DOG for my camera and my audience.  You could spend Sunday afternoon searching for your autumn-winter wardrobe, but that can wait a few days.

Something relevant and perhaps not coincidental: I am reading with great pleasure OPEN CITY, the 2011 debut novel by Teju Cole — the book a gift from tenor saxophonist Sam Taylor, and after beginning this blog, I had to leave my computer but could take the book with me.  The narrator says, early on, of a younger friend in his neighborhood, “My friend was especially passionate about jazz. Most of the names and styles that he so delighted in meant little to me (there are apparently number of great jazz musicians from the sixties and seventies with the last name Jones).  But I could sense, even from my ignorant distance, the sophistication of his ear.  He often said that he would sit down at a piano someday and show me how jazz worked, and that when I finally understood blue notes and swung notes, the heavens would part and my life would be transformed.  I more than half believed him . . . ” (24-25).

Cole’s words echo Forrester’s “tunes.”

May your happiness increase!

SOUND-SUGGESTIONS: JOEL FORRESTER FIVE at SILVANA (July 24, 2017)

One of the happinesses of 2017 has been reconnecting with the singularly multi-talented Joel Forrester: piano, compositions, arrangements, thoughts, and feelings.  I’ve been changed by his music, and I don’t write those words casually. It’s serious and playful, sorrowful and hilarious all at once.

JOEL FORRESTER, photograph by Metin Oner

I was happy to be on the scene for another appearance by Joel’s quintet — this time at Silvana, oat 300 West 116th Street in New York City, on July 24.  Along with Joel, the quintet is old friends Dave Hofstra, string bass; Matt Garrity, drums; Michi Fuji, violin; Michael Irwin, trumpet.  No cliches, no trickery. Just deep feelings and deep improvisations in an hour-long set that felt rich and spacious . . . and filling: I didn’t want to hear any more music that night.

DON’T ASK ME NOW:

FINDING MY WAY BACK HOME:

SOME THINGS DON’T WORK OUT:

SOLDIERS IN THE ARMY (the rhythm section only, but joined by the enthusiastic audience):

AFTER YOU, JOEL:

SILENT NIGHT BLUES:

FLIP-FLOP:

You’ll notice I wrote “another”: my first encounter with the Five was at the Shrine, also in Harlem, on July 17, captured here.  Since the Five performed a few of the same tunes at both gigs, you can compare and contrast.  Comparison is said to be odious, but not with this small expansive traveling orchestra.

May your happiness increase!