Tag Archives: New Orleans

A NIGHT AT THE BOMBAY CLUB (Part Two): KRIS TOKARSKI, JAMES EVANS, HAL SMITH (September 22, 2016)

bombay-clubYes, The Bombay Clubthat luxurious New Orleans hangout in the Prince Conti Hotel, home to good music, food, drink, and friendships.  I visited it for the first time on the date above, to hear Kris Tokarski, James Evans, and Hal Smith — my premiere offering from that session can be found here.

And here is Part Two: listen to the way this trio blends the three voices into a larger, delightful organism, with each member keeping his individuality.

An absolutely gorgeous SOPHISTICATED LADY:

GET HAPPY, thanks to Harold Arlen at the rehearsal piano:

JUST YOU, JUST ME:

TOP HAT, WHITE TIE AND TAILS:

Yes, there are several more joyous instant-classics from this session, and they will appear.

May your happiness increase!

A NIGHT AT THE BOMBAY CLUB (Part One): KRIS TOKARSKI, JAMES EVANS, HAL SMITH (September 22, 2016)

bombay-club

It was my first time at The Bombay Club in New Orleans, and I know it won’t be my last.  The music was splendid — as you will see and hear — created by Kris Tokarski, piano; James Evans, reeds and vocal; Hal Smith, drums.

LOUISIANA:

I’M PUTTING ALL MY EGGS IN ONE BASKET:

DON’T BLAME ME:

BUT NOT FOR ME:

I would point out that Kris, James, and Hal aren’t involved in some densely researched multi-layered repertory project.  They are stylistic rovers, happily wandering around in the glorious present of swing, creating beautiful sounds and deeply listening to each other.  Individualists who have given their hearts to the collective endeavor.

There’s more from this glorious session.  I guarantee it.

May your happiness increase!

AT THE STOMP, AND THEY CERTAINLY DO (Part One): KRIS TOKARSKI, ANDY SCHUMM, HAL SMITH at SNUG HARBOR (September 25, 2016)

hot-classicism

It was just magical: twice during the 2016 Steamboat Stomp, a new favorite CD came to life in front of my eyes.  The CD — above — features Kris Tokarski, piano; Andy Schumm, cornet and clarinet; Hal Smith, drums, playing subtly but with tremendous heat.  (Not incidentally, the CD is available here, and to me it’s an instant classic.

I stayed in New Orleans an extra night at the end of the wonderful 2016 Steamboat Stomp to catch the “Hot Classicism” trio live at Snug Harbor, and what they have to say is plenty.  Here are five performances from that evening, and there will be more.

WEARY BLUES:

STRATFORD HUNCH:

IDA, SWEET AS APPLE CIDER (of course for Ida Melrose Shoufler):

CHICAGO RHYTHM:

MISTER JOE:

Could you be Hot Classicism-deficient?  Rather than visiting your local network medical professional, I suggest that you can remedy this common ailment by a) watching these videos; b) purchasing the trio’s CD here; c) finding somewhere that they are playing.  I know that HOT CLASSICISM will have a set or more at the San Diego Jazz Fest at the end of this month. Come say hello.  Let your inner Stomper be joyful.

As Smokey the Bear always says, “Only YOU can prevent starving musicians.”

May your happiness increase!

A SOUVENIR OF NEW ORLEANS: BRUNCH WITH JOE SIMON’S JAZZ TRIO featuring ALEX OWEN, JOHN EUBANKS, MARK BROOKS at MURIEL’S JACKSON SQUARE (September 25, 2016)

alex-alone

I had known of the engaging young trumpeter / vocalist Alex Owen through his own band, the Messy Cookers, whose debut CD also features guitarist John Eubanks.

Alex and John and friends on another gig.

Alex and John and friends on another gig.

When I visited New Orleans last month for the Steamboat Stomp, Alex and I got together for pleasant conversation and dinner.  And when I heard he would be playing with John and string bassist  / vocalist Mark Brooks as “Joe Simon’s Jazz Trio” for Sunday brunch at Muriel’s Jackson Square , my camera, tripod, and I took over a table for four and had a good time.  The food was both elaborate and pleasing; the service even more so (thanks to Patrick and David L.) but the music was the truly satisfying main dish: lyrical, hot but gentle, entertaining without pandering.

Now, you may see and hear for yourself.  JAZZ LIVES can’t provide shrimp and grits or a salad of fresh greens and fruit, and you’ll have to pour your own coffee. But I’ll wait while you prepare yourself for the musical delights offered by Alex, John, and Mark: gently swinging and never hackneyed.

Usually I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS is a closing number, but it works very well as a welcome to the gig:

I need Fats in my diet:

A good old good one from Mark:

Venerable and hot, courtesy of the ODJB, Condon, and many more:

A memorable 1920 pop tune:

You’ll miss me, honey!

We never get tired of marveling at Irving Berlin’s genius:

A request, handled with style:

Another paean in praise of the state:

And, as a closer to the second set, ‘WAY DOWN YONDER IN NEW ORLEANS:

What lovely sounds.

May your happiness increase!

“HOT CLASSICISM” by KRIS TOKARSKI, ANDY SCHUMM, HAL SMITH on DISC (and LIVE)

If it were possible to play a compact disc to extinction, my copy of HOT CLASSICISM would be gone by now.  Amazingly, the disc is starting to look translucent.

What it contains is the rousing and lovely performances by Kris Tokarski, piano; Andy Schumm, cornet or clarinet; Hal Smith, drums, recorded live in New Orleans at the Old U.S. Mint on January 13, 2016.  Here’s a sample — the rollicking PARKWAY STOMP:

Several of the performances appeared as videos on YouTube, but the fidelity of the CD is immensely superior, and you can’t (or at least you shouldn’t) play videos in the car unless you are a passenger, so I commend this disc to you with high enthusiasm.

hot-classicism

HOT CLASSICISM was produced by Kris.  You can order a copy at his website, here, and if you are in New Orleans come see the trio’s CD release show. This Saturday, the 24th, at 8:15 PM they play at the Steamboat Stomp and Sunday the 25th, they are at Snug Harbor, with sets at 8 and 10 PM.

hot-c-photoHere’s what I wrote for the CD.  In full candor, I insisted on writing something for them, and would have been very put out if they had said NO.  I believe in this music and these musicians with all my being.

One of my favorite quotations is “We cannot ask the dead to come back. We can, however, invite them to live through us.” This CD is a vibrant, generous conversation between the Ancestors and three very much alive Jazz Masters. Kris, Andy, and Hal know that Lester was right, that you have to “go for yourself.” But innovation is a Mobius strip: try to be yourself by rejecting the Past and you might run dry in mid-chorus. The Elders were innovative in their moment. We revere them but we honor the past by making it new.

“Hot classicism” is the phrase that came to my mind when I first encountered these magically conjoined kindred souls, their music an instantaneous wallop of bliss that hasn’t faded yet. In this trio, everything is in balance. It’s a true Hot Democracy where everyone gets a chance to blow, where musicians support one another for “the comfort of the band.” Listening to this joyous session, I also thought of the great classical chamber trios and quartets: Casals-Thibaud-Cortot, for one example. In those groups, even though musicians were following printed scores, their sensibilities, temperaments, and vocal timbres blazed through. Someone listening to an unnamed violinist on radio or record recognized the player: Szigeti, not Heifetz; Stuff, not Stephane. And those personalities blended in wondrous synergy.

“Hot,” everyone knows as the remarkable marriage of passionate abandon and exquisite control. These performances, as Hot as you could want, are technically splendid, idiomatically pleasing. But here’s the beautiful part: they are marvelous because the players know what not to play, how to leave space. They know that too much is not a good thing, with apologies to Mae West and Oscar Wilde. Hal, Kris, and Andy embody ancient virtues: how to say your piece eloquently in sixteen bars; how to create memorable syncopated dance music. And since they are temporal hybrids – living simultaneously in 1926, 1936, and 2016, a very pleasing subversive freedom animates these performances. These musicians roam freely in a universe of sounds. They bring their modern awareness to the sacred texts of the past. Consider Andy’s clarinet playing, which reflects the great Chicagoans and New Orleanians but also delineates an alternate universe where Milt Mesirow put in that ten thousand hours of practice. So the music here, although deeply devout, goes its own way. If there’s a harmony or a rhythmic suspension that works at that moment, this trio offers it joyously, even if Keppard would have frowned on it.

James Joyce said of ULYSSES, not humbly but perhaps accurately, that if Dublin were to be destroyed, it could be built again from his novel. And if all the monumental jazz recordings prior to, say, 1930 were to vanish, one could rebuild the Hot Library of Alexandria from this CD.

Some listeners (they can’t help themselves) will compulsively start a list of Influences and Models that they hear. I won’t. This CD is completely endearing because it’s music. Let others point out, “Oh, that’s exactly the note that Kid Wawa plays on take 17, the take that only came out on Beka 12666-4!” I say, “Don’t these fellows sound grand, utterly like themselves?”

The only thing missing from this session is a band vocal: I think of the three of them humming behind a Kris solo passage or (dare I dream) hearing the trio warble the ode containing the heroic couplet, “You bought my wife a Coca-Cola / So you could play on her Victrola.” Maybe on the second disc of this trio’s oeuvre.

Andy, Kris, and Hal create affectionate wise music that amazes us, touches our hearts, helps make our world dance. Infinitely complex yet plain as day, their music enriches us.

Don’t be the last one on your block to experience HOT CLASSICISM.

May your happiness increase!

HOAGY APPROVES! VISIONS OF NEW ORLEANS, MADE REAL (Part Two): KRIS TOKARSKI, TIM LAUGHLIN, and HAL SMITH at the EVERGREEN JAZZ FESTIVAL (July 31, 2016)

Double rainbow, Evergreen, Colorado, 2014. Photograph by Michael Steinman

Double rainbow, Evergreen, Colorado, 2014. Photograph by Michael Steinman

You can experience the joy of Part One here.  All I will say is that I hope the MacArthur “genius grant” people are viewing this and the previous post: letters should be sent out now.  I won’t share their addresses, but the three superb creators of Melody and Swing are Tim Laughlin (clarinet), New Orleans; Kris Tokarski (piano), the same city; Hal Smith (drums), Searcy, Arkansas.

For the second part of the musical offering, here are two songs by Hoagy Carmichael.  The first has a glorious Louis Armstrong connection — both on disc and on film.  The second is a mournful poem in praise of the Crescent City, and the first recording of it I know features a young Jimmy Rushing with the Bennie Moten band.  Heroic antecedents, I would say.

JUBILEE:

and NEW ORLEANS, with the verse no one does:

And this just in.  My phone made a peculiar sound.  There was a text from a private number — a huge smiling emoticon with the initials H.C. beneath it. I take that as a celestial vote of confidence!

I don’t think I have to reiterate what a glorious time I had at the 2016 Evergreen Jazz Festival.  The music, as they say, speaks for itself.  And there’s more to come.

May your happiness increase!

LYRICISM, DRAMA, FUN, SWING: TIM LAUGHLIN, CONNIE JONES, DOUG FINKE, CHRIS DAWSON, KATIE CAVERA, MARTY EGGERS, HAL SMITH at the SAN DIEGO JAZZ FEST (Nov. 29, 2014)

I’ve seen and heard a great deal of live jazz performance since 2004 (and before then) and occasionally I feel as if the video camera has been grafted on my body (“More than five thousand published YouTube videos,” he said immodestly) — but the band that follows is one of my great pleasures.

TIM AND CONNIE FQF

It’s a delicious hybrid of deep New Orleans, Bob Crosby Bobcats, Teddy Wilson and Basie small groups.  I speak of Tim Laughlin’s All Stars featuring the master of melody on clarinet; Connie Jones, cornet; Doug Finke, trombone; Chris Dawson, piano; Marty Eggers, string bass; Hal Smith, drums.  Here they are in all their delightful gliding majesty at the 2014 San Diego Jazz Fest.

TIM AND CONNIE

YOU’RE LUCKY TO ME:

BUDDY BOLDEN’S BLUES:

DO YOU EVER THINK OF ME?:

And a vocal feature for someone who’s not only one of the greatest instrumentalists I know — but also a great musical actor and singer, Mister Connie Jones — NEW ORLEANS AND A RUSTY OLD HORN:

I treasure these musicians and these performances, and feel privileged beyond words that I have been in the same room (with a camera) with these masters.

May your happiness increase!