Tag Archives: New York City

NEW YORK CAKE: TERRY WALDO, EVAN ARNTZEN, JON-ERIK KELLSO, BRIAN NALEPKA, JIM FRYER, JOHN GILL, JAY LEPLEY at FAT CAT (January 29, 2017)

Not this (announced as “the best New York style cheesecake):

but a hot version of the song immortalized in 1924 and 1925 by Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet, Bessie Smith and others, CAKE WALKIN’ BABIES FROM HOME.  This is my second CAKE post: the first, presenting two hot performances by Dave Kosymna, Christopher Smith, Ray Heitger, Nicole Heitger, James Dapogny, and Pete Siers (all deftly captured by Laura Wyman) may be visited here.

But my experience of New York and New  Yorkers — even from the suburbs, what Flaubert would call the provinces — is that we don’t like to take second place to anyone or anything.  And in a cake walking contest, second place is noplace.

So here’s the New York version, created a month earlier at Fat Cat (75 Christopher Street in Greenwich Village) by Terry Waldo and the Gotham City Band, who were on that Sunday Evan Arntzen, Jon-Erik Kellso, Jim Fryer, Jay Lepley, Brian Nalepka, John Gill.  Consider for yourselves:

I won’t ask viewers to set up mock combat between Ohio and New York: all those cakes and contests are beautiful and hot.

May your happiness increase!

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BIG BAND MONDAY WITH THE GLENN CRYTZER ORCHESTRA at the FILLMORE ROOM (Monday, February 29, 2016)

Glenn Crytzer Orchestra flyer

It’s lovely to see an enterprising musician take the risk of leading a big band — and Glenn Crytzer (compositions / arrangements / guitar / banjo / vocals) is just that enterprising.  Although most New Yorkers know him for his work with quartets and septets, his new Orchestra (four reeds, four rhythm, five brass) is creating a splash at the Fillmore Room — 146 Tenth Avenue at 19th Street — from 7-10 PM every Monday.  I was there last Monday, February 29.  You can’t see the brilliant dancers off to my left, but you’ll have to imagine them on a substantial wooden dance floor.

Ordinarily I wouldn’t post a dozen videos at one time, but I wanted JAZZ LIVES viewers to get a sense of the band’s sustained energy — the way it barrels through three sets.  And just maybe some viewers in the metropolitan area will be sufficiently inspired to make the pilgrimage to Big Band Mondays.

The band itself was Glenn, guitar / banjo / vocal / arrangements / compositions; Ian Hutchinson, string bass; Jesse Gelber, piano; Andrew Millar, drums; Jason Prover, Sam Hoyt, Mike Davis, trumpets; Joe McDonough, Matt Musselman, trombone; Ricky Alexander, Linus Wyrsch, Evan Arntzen, Dan Block, reeds. And the Orchestra’s book is substantial: originals, homages to Goodman, Shaw, Lunceford, Waller, Louis, Lionel, Duke, Webb, Kirk, and more.

WALLINGFORD WIGGLES:

I GET IDEAS:

A MELLOW BIT OF RHYTHM:

HEY BA-BA RE-BOP!:

THE ROAD TO TALLAHASSEE:

TRAFFIC JAM:

APOLLO BLUES:

ME, MYSELF AND I:

BLUES FOR NORMA:

SQUEEZE ME:

BLACK AND TAN FANTASY:

IF DREAMS COME TRUE:

Book tickets / make reservations here

May your happiness increase!

BRIGHTENING THE CORNER: JOEL PRESS, MICHAEL KANAN, NEAL MINER at MEZZROW: PART TWO (July 26, 2015)

Joel Press

When I heard that Joel Press, tenor saxophone; Michael Kanan, piano; Neal Miner, string bass, were going to be playing a late-evening session at one of the two jazz shrines of West Tenth Street, Mezzrow, I got down there early to soak it all in — poems in music from three great lyrical poets.  Here are some highlights of the first part of the evening.

Joel, Michael, and Neal tell us, without words, that melody matters, that the old songs are memorable, and that one can sing beautifully through one’s instrument in a community of friends.

YOU’RE DRIVING ME CRAZY:

GONE WITH THE WIND:

HOW’S THE HORN TREATING YOU:

GHOST OF A CHANCE:

IT’S YOU OR NO ONE:

Joel has absorbed the whole tradition of jazz but stays current, exploring worlds while swinging, always sounding like himself.  Michael and Neal are the best guides to the opened universe of sounds that I know.

May your happiness increase!

“THIS ROVER / CROSSED OVER”: MARTY GROSZ, JON BURR, PETE SIERS, ANDY SCHUMM, DAN LEVINSON at the ALLEGHENY JAZZ PARTY (September 20, 2014)

It’s one of the most familiar songs in American popular music:

SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET

But you might not know this variation on the theme, with an urban New York twist:

Sign on sidewalk: 'Please direct your feet to the sunny side of the street...'

Sign on sidewalk: ‘Please direct your feet to the sunny side of the street…’

And this, courtesy of Marty Grosz, Andy Schumm, Dan Levinson, Jon Burr, Pete Siers:

You wouldn’t have seen this morning musicale unless you’d been at the 2014 Allegheny Jazz Party.  This is just to say — with thanks to William Carlos Williams — that such glorious effusions will take place once again at this year’s Party from September 10-13.  It’s a chance to be on the sunny side, with no after-effects requiring a dermatologist.

May your happiness increase!

SHE CAME TO PLAY: SARAH SPENCER STOMPS IT DOWN, PART TWO (June 10, 2015)

I can precisely document the time and place my admiration for Sarah Spencer began.  The site was the second floor of Casa Mezcal (86 Orchard Street, on the Lower East Side of New York City) around 3 PM on Sunday, June 5 — an event I’ve documented here. Witnessing this was Tamar Korn (it was her gig), violinist / baritone saxophonist Andy Stein and pianist Ehud Asherie.  Then, happily, Sarah brought her tenor saxophone to the Wednesday, June 10 gig of the Hot Jazz Rabble at the Tryon Public House (4740 Broadway).

Her friends in the Rabble were Jim Fryer, trombone; Mike Davis, trumpet; Glenn Crytzer, banjo; Jennifer Vincent, string bass.

A word before readers jump into the videos.  To tenor saxophone aficionados who have grown up on Hawk, Ben, Lester, and their modern descendants, Sarah’s playing may take sixteen bars to get used to.  If, however, you know the New Orleans tradition of Cap’n John Handy and Emmanuel Paul, Sarah’s bubbling, exuberant work will make you feel at home immediately.

She told me that she doesn’t see herself as a member of the front line, alongside trumpet and trombone, but rather as part of the rhythm section, energizing it in naturally.  What you’ll hear in her joyous ensemble playing sounds like a cross between water rushing over rocks and a very dark, ferocious Bud Freeman who’s been boling crawfish.

With that as preface, here she is on MARIE:

And here Sarah sings DOWN IN THE MOUF’ BLUES, which is a late Clara Smith performance.  Please note that she does more than copy the recorded performance.  Even better, she varies her phrasing from chorus to chorus with lovely shifts of emphasis and meter.  There is the surface appearance of don’t-care roughness, but underneath there is many subtle variations on the simple theme:

Sarah’s authenticity and enthusiasm are very winning.  Her personality doesn’t come through entirely in the videos, so you have to see and hear her for yourself.  I think of her as a youthful Earth Mother of New Orleans stomp by way of the UK and Connecticut.

And she and her Transatlantic Band are playing a gig this June 20th: details here!

May your happiness increase!

UPTOWN WEDNESDAY NIGHT!

Jim Fryer has good taste — as trombonist, euphonist, trumpeter, singer, composer, bandleader, reader of big books . . . and he’s currently trying something heroic and lovely: starting a new hot jazz scene in an area that hasn’t had one for a long time.

The place is the Tryon Public House, every Wednesday night from 11 PM to 1 AM.  It is genuinely “uptown,” 4740 Broadway, steps from the Dyckman Street stop on the A train.  New York City, of course.  Jim’s assembled a group he calls, demurely, the HOT JAZZ RABBLE.  In addition to Jim, the participants are trumpeter / singer Mike Davis, plectrist / singer / composer Glenn Crytzer, a bassist of choice — that means a choice bassist [last week it was Peter Ford; this week it will be Jennifer Vincent].  And the gig has been attracting virtuous New York hot talents — last week trumpeter Jordan Hirsch, and the word on the hot grapevine is that Mike and Jordan wailed on CORNET CHOP SUEY.  Dancing encouraged.  I am told there are fine liquids for purchase.  And I know there will be sitting-in.  As Jim says, “Please help us get a scene going here in Manhattan del Norte!”

Because I’ve been Going to School all my life, I am a morning person — but I hope to  make it to this Wednesday’s festivities.  And I know that my friend Sarah Spencer, a stomping New Orleans tenor player and down-home singer, will be there as well.

And now comes the didactic part.  Delicate readers may turn away or shield the children’s eyes.  But because of the internet and the overwhelming accessibility of free live music, audio and video, many jazz fans no longer have to or no longer choose to leave their houses to support living musicians actually playing the music.  Thrift, Horatio.  But when there is no scene, it might be because some of the fans didn’t put their shoes on and visit it.  Enough said.

May your happiness increase!

A WARMING TREND: TIM LAUGHLIN, CONNIE JONES, DOUG FINKE, CHRIS DAWSON, MARTY EGGERS, KATIE CAVERA, HAL SMITH at the SAN DIEGO JAZZ FEST (Nov. 28, 2014)

As I write these words, it is once again snowing in New York.  This calls for drastic measures.  More than a snow shovel or ice scraper, more than a down parka or silk underwear.

I need to heat things up.  And I know just the source of gentle but persuasive warming:

Just as a public service, I will point out that the song is the venerable yet still very lively JAZZ ME BLUES, played here on November 28, 2014, at the San Diego Jazz Fest, by a collection of swing superheroes: Tim Laughlin, clarinet; Connie Jones, cornet; Doug Finke, trombone; Chris Dawson, piano; Katie Cavera, guitar; Marty Eggers, string bass; Hal Smith, drums.

If every JAZZ LIVES reader now enduring a cold climate would turn the volume up and open a window, I believe we would have the best kind of global warming, with no deleterious side effects.  Or if that theory does not appeal, I suggest you do what I’ve been doing — playing this performance over and over, admiring its broad structure and many subtleties.

May your happiness increase!