Tag Archives: Otis Bazoon

NOTES FROM CONNIE (April 8, 2016)

small purple flowerAbout a month ago, I wrote this tribute to the most beloved Connie Jones, who announced his retirement at a performance at the French Quarter Jazz Fest, two weeks after the performances below on April 8.  Through the good offices of my friend, the superb drummer Hal Smith, I found these two precious videos, shot by Mark Jones — documenting that concert.  Connie Jones and the French Quarter Festival All Stars are Connie, vocal and cornet; Tim Laughlin, clarinet; Charlie Halloran, trombone; Duke Heitger, trumpet; Otis Bazoon, tenor saxophone; David Boeddinghaus, piano; Ed Wise, string bass; Hal Smith, drums.

Here’s A HUNDRED YEARS FROM TODAY:

and TISHOMINGO BLUES:

Bless Connie Jones and his devoted friends.

May your happiness increase!

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FRENCH QUARTER WEST: TIM LAUGHLIN, CONNIE JONES, DOUG FINKE, CHRIS DAWSON, MARTY EGGERS, KATIE CAVERA, HAL SMITH at the SAN DIEGO JAZZ FEST (Nov. 29, 2014)

I was perusing Facebook today (face it, I’m hooked) and saw this entry from the splendid string bassist Ed Wise, which I reproduce in part:

Friday, April 10
French Quarter Festival
with Connie Jones’ Crescent City Jazz Band (Tim Laughlin, Bob Havens, Otis Bazoon, David Boeddinghaus, Bryan Barberot and, of course, yours truly.)
Jackson Square
11:00 a.m.

It was and is probably very ungenerous of me, but I got upset . . . for purely selfish reasons.  “How could that beautiful band be playing there without me?” I of course realized this both vain and silly: beautiful music goes on all the time, the swing tree falling in the forest without Michael to video it, but still I felt deprived.

And then I realized, and spoke to myself in the gentle interior monologue I try to cultivate: “Hey, you have many beautiful videos of Connie and Tim from the 2014 San Diego Jazz Fest.  Why not post one of them as your own French Quarter Fest?”

And here we are:

That’s Tim, clarinet; Connie, cornet; Doug Finke, trombone; Chris Dawson, piano; Katie Cavera, rhythm guitar; Marty Eggers, string bass; Hal Smith, drums. Glorious.

And don’t get upset that the song is called FAREWELL BLUES.  This music isn’t saying good-bye any time soon.

May your happiness increase!

 

LOOK OUT! STEAMBOAT COMIN’ ROUND THE BEND!

It is May. Yet I am making plans for November 14-16, 2014. That’s the kind of fellow I am, even if it goes against all the good advice about living in the moment.

I learned from Duke Heitger at last weekend’s jubilant Atlanta Jazz Party that the 2014 Steamboat Stomp — a three-day floating jazz festival held on the steamboat Natchez, floating up and down the Mississippi from New Orleans, is going to happen.

890_stomp2014

It was a glorious weekend in 2013.

steamboatnatchez-paddle

And Duke has some of the same people lined up — the Yerba Buena Stompers, Banu Gibson, and Topsy Chapman — with hints of other heroes and heroines to come.

Of course, much of my pleasure was in the glorious music. But some of it was deeper and harder to explicate. Maybe it was looking out at the Mississippi River flowing by after all those years of reading and teaching HUCKLEBERRY FINN. Maybe it was being on an actual steamboat listening to jazz — the way one might have heard it in 1921 when Fate Marable’s band swung out. Maybe it was getting to walk down the streets of New Orleans — those fabled streets — and try different varieties of gumbo. I can’t tell you exactly what parts of the experience made the strongest impact. But I will be there! And I hope some of my friends can join me.

Here’s some musical evidence of the New Orleans Joys available to people at the Stomp. I do not overstate, you will see.

Before:

Palm Court Cafe, Part One

Palm Court Cafe, Part Two

Oh, Sheik That Thing!

The Steamboat Stomp itself:

Ms. Gibson’s Singular Cardiological Rhythms

Mr. Thompson’s Indigos

Doctor Pistorius and the Worlds of Love

Rocking the River

Stomping for Joy

Joe Oliver  Is Pleased

If that doesn’t convince the hesitant, I don’t know what will.  For myself, the thought of it suddenly becoming November is terrifying. But as far as the 2014 Steamboat Stomp is concerned, I’m ready.

May your happiness increase!

LEAVE YOUR TENT FLAP OPEN: THE SHEIK APPROACHES (October 10, 2013)

“At night, when you’re asleep, into your tent I’ll creep.”

Not me personally, but THE SHEIK OF ARABY.

page1-293px-Sheik_of_Araby.pdf

The SHEIK, a very vigorous fellow from 1921, made his appearance thanks to Duke Heitger and his Crescent City Joymakers, on October 10, 2013 at The Palm Court Jazz Cafe — 1204 Decatur Street — the night before the 2013 Steamboat Stomp began.

The beautiful hot band was and is Duke, trumpet; Otis Bazoon, reeds; David Boeddinghaus, piano; Richard Moten, string bass; Jeff Hamilton, drums, joined by Ray Heitger (Duke’s father), clarinet; Jon-Erik Kellso (Duke’s friend, comrade, and inspiration — in town from New York for a PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION show):

And how they played!  Admire, please, the sweetly intertwining horn lines of two soloists who are also great ensemble players, then consider the rest of the Gentlemen of the Ensemble.  I don’t know if they would (singly or collectively) creep into anyone’s tent, but you will have to negotiate such arrangements on your own.

And . . . live music is one of the many things I am thankful for this and every other day and night.  And the company of loving friends. And much more.  I wish that all of you have 365 1/4 days of Thanksgiving this year and every year.

May your happiness increase!

BEFORE THE STOMP, THERE WAS GREAT MUSIC (Part Two): DUKE HEITGER and the CRESCENT CITY JOYMAKERS at THE PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE: OTIS BAZOON, DAVID BOEDDINGHAUS, RICHARD MOTEN, JEFF HAMILTON, RAY HEITGER (October 10, 2013)

Duke Heitger’s wonderful Steamboat Stomp in New Orleans — a jazz festival on the steamboat Natchez — started unofficially the night before, Thursday, October 10, 2013, with a sweetly evocative session at The Palm Court Jazz Cafe (1204 Decatur Street).  Duke’s colleagues were clarinetist / saxophonist Otis Bazoon, pianist David Boeddinghaus, string bassist Richard Moten, and drummer Jeff Hamilton.  Later, some friends and family arrived to have fun on the bandstand, too.  Here’s a second substantial portion of heartfelt jazz — good old good ones that will never grow old.  We like it, we like it:

I COVER THE WATERFRONT:

PANAMA:

STARDUST:

MAMA INEZ (add Ray Heitger, clarinet):

ST. JAMES INFIRMARY:

May your happiness increase!

BEFORE THE STOMP, THERE WAS GREAT MUSIC (Part One): DUKE HEITGER and the CRESCENT CITY JOYMAKERS at THE PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE: OTIS BAZOON, DAVID BOEDDINGHAUS, RICHARD MOTEN, JEFF HAMILTON (October 10, 2013)

Duke Heitger’s wonderful Steamboat Stomp in New Orleans — a jazz festival on the steamboat Natchez — started unofficially the night before, Thursday, October 10, 2013, with a sweetly evocative session at The Palm Court Jazz Cafe (1204 Decatur Street).  Duke’s colleagues were clarinetist / saxophonist Otis Bazoon, pianist David Boeddinghaus, string bassist Richard Moten, and drummer Jeff Hamilton.  Later, some friends and family arrived to have fun on the bandstand, too.

Here’s a substantial portion of spicy music.

MUSKRAT RAMBLE:

AUNT HAGAR’S BLUES:

KING PORTER STOMP:

HINDUSTAN:

May your happiness increase!

GET HOT in NEW ORLEANS AT A DISCOUNT (sign up before Sept. 30, 2011)!

This just in from the New Orleans Traditional Jazz Camp for Adults:

Spend a week in Historic New Orleans learning to play Traditional Jazz under the instruction of some of the finest musicians in the city, enjoy some of the best food in the world, and marvel at the beautiful architecture of the French Quarter. Come to the Birthplace of Jazz and fall under the magical spell of our music and our people. As they say, “There is no place like New Orleans!”

The New Orleans Traditional Jazz Camp for Adults will be held June 10-15, 2012.  Tuition, which includes instruction, lodging, breakfast and lunch, will be discounted $150.00 if paid in full by the early bird registration deadline of September 30, 2011.  It is important to register and pay early to reserve your spot because classes will fill up. 

To date, we are about 2/3 full with campers registered from all over the United States as well as Sweden, Germany and Finland.  Campers spend the day in ensemble and group sessions with their instructors and evenings are spent jamming at the hotel or at various music venues nearby.  Fritzel’s is right across the street from the hotel and Preservation Hall and other music venues are within a short walking distance.

Music history speakers discuss New Orleans music heritage and culture during meals. One evening of the camp is dedicated to a traditional New Orleans “Second Line Parade.”  Campers parade through the streets of the French Quarter playing jazz to the delight of our many visitors.  Another night campers perform at the world-renowned Preservation Hall, a moving experience for everyone to be in the revered “Hall” where many of our musical fathers and mothers performed.

Camp concludes Friday night with a “Camper Concert” at the Grand Ballroom of the Historic Bourbon Orleans Hotel.  The public is invited and the ballroom really swings. Saturday is “Lagniappe Day,” a little something extra, a Traditional Jazz Festival.  Campers who can stay over are invited to perform at this festival.

Please visit our website at www.neworleanstradjazzcamp.com for more information.

We look forward to our 3rd camp and reconnecting with old friends and meeting new ones.

Red Beans and Ricely Yours,(as Louis Armstrong said)

Banu Gibson  Leslie Cooper  Nita Hemeter

A little commentary from JAZZ LIVES.  The faculty includes Banu Gibson, vocals and good cheer; Kerry Lewis, string bass; David Sager, trombone; Otis Bazoon, reeds; Matt Perrine, bass / tuba; David Boeddinghaus, piano; Carl LeBlanc, banjo; Gerald French, drums; Leah Chase, vocals; Ed Clute, piano; and the irreplaceable Hot guru of the cornet, Connie Jones.  Do you think if I pray at the shrine of Donald S. Reinhardt (with or without the pencil) I could be ready to go there in 2012?  I can dream — but you can sign up . . . .