Tag Archives: Paul Motian

HANDFULS OF KEYS: DAN MORGENSTERN CELEBRATES MARTIAL SOLAL (and ANDRE HODEIR), EDDIE COSTA, and WILLIE “THE LION” SMITH (July 6, 2018)

Another visit with our favorite Jazz Eminence who, having spoken first of saxophonists Dexter Gordon here, Sonny Stitt, and Lee Konitz here, moves on to pianists Solal (with a digression to critic / violinist Hodeir), pianist-vibraphonist Costa, and pianist-force of nature Willie “the Lion” Smith . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a previous conversation Dan had spoken of Solal with great enthusiasm, so I followed his lead:

I also wondered what Dan knew of the brilliant, short-lived, multi-talented Eddie Costa:

and finally, for that afternoon, glimpses of Willie “the Lion” Smith:

Now, some music.

Martial Solal, 1963, playing Django (with whom he recorded) — accompanied by Teddy Kotick and Paul Motian.  (The sessions were recorded in New York City.):

Eddie Costa, Wendell Marshall, Paul Motian:

Willie “the Lion” Smith, 1965, introduced by Humphrey Lyttelton — accompanied by Brian Brocklehurst and Lennie Hastings.

Thank you so much, Mister Morgenstern!  More stories to come . . . Randy Weston, Jaki Byard, Ira Gitler, Slim Gaillard, Harry Lim, Jeff Atterton, Kiyoshi Kuyama . . . and others.

May your happiness increase!

TWO WAYS OF LOOKING AT PAUL MOTIAN

Fred Settenberg’s piece on Paul Motian intrigues me.  Although I don’t always enjoy writing so powerfully aware of its own power, Settenberg’s piece — just posted a day ago — moves me.  It feels candid, adult, a little wry: and the love for Motian’s music and what it implied, the dreams that great art leads us into, is fully realized.

It’s worth reading for sure: Motian

But I know that Paul Motian was — in his own quiet, amused, compelling way — a man too large to be encompassed by just one piece of writing.  So here is the photographer John Rogers’ tribute to Motian as loving mentor and guide to the big city — a piece I haven’t been able to get out of my system since I first read it:

Dinners and Drum Music

I wish I could require my students to read these two beautiful evocations side-by-side: Settenberg imagining an ideal future in the sound of recorded jazz; Rogers finding his way with Motian at his side.  How very different, how moving, and how true!