Tag Archives: Peter Appleyard

BOB AND RUTH BYLER + CAMERA = HOURS OF GOOD MUSIC

Bob and Ruth Byler

Bob and Ruth Byler

I first became aware of Bob Byler — writer, photographer, videographer — when we both wrote for THE MISSISSIPPI RAG, but with the demise of that wonderful journalistic effusion (we still miss Leslie Johnson, I assure you) I had not kept track of him.  But he hasn’t gone away, and he is now providing jazz viewers with hours of pleasure.

“Spill, Brother Michael!” shouts a hoarse voice from the back of the room.

As you can see in the photograph above, Bob has always loved capturing the music — and, in this case, in still photographs.  But in 1984, he bought a video camera.  In fact, he bought several in varying media: eight-millimeter tape, VHS, and even mini-DVDs, and he took them to jazz concerts wherever he could. Now, when he shares the videos, edits them, revisits them, he says, “I’m so visual-oriented, it’s like being at a jazz festival again without the crowd.  It’s a lot of fun.”  Bob told me that he shot over two thousand hours of video and now has uploaded about four hundred hours to YouTube.

Here is his flickr.com site, full of memorable closeups of players and singers. AND the site begins with a neatly organized list of videos . . .

Bob and his late wife Ruth had gone to jazz festivals all over the world — and a few cruises — and he had taken a video camera with him long before I ever had the notion.  AND he has put some four hundred hours of jazz video on YouTube on the aptly named Bob and Ruth Byler Archival Jazz Videos channel. His filming perspective was sometimes far back from the stage (appropriate for large groups) so a video that’s thirty years old might take a moment to get used to. But Bob has provided us with one time capsule after another.  And unlike the ladies and gents of 2016, who record one-minute videos on their smartphones, Bob captured whole sets, entire concerts.  Most of his videos are nearly two hours long, and there are more than seventy of them now up — for our dining and dancing pleasure.  Many of the players are recognizable, but I haven’t yet sat down and gone through forty or a hundred hours of video, so that is part of the fun — recognizing old friends and heroes.  Because (and I say this sadly) many of the musicians on Bob’s videos have made the transition, which makes this video archive, generously offered, so precious.

Here is Bob’s own introduction to the collection, which tells more than I could:

Here are the “West Coast Stars,” performing at the Elkhart Jazz Party, July 1990:

an Art Hodes quartet, also from Elkhart, from 1988:

What might have been one of Zoot Sims’ last performances, in Toledo, in 1985:

a compilation of performances featuring Spiegle Willcox (with five different bands) from 1991-1997, a tribute  Bob is particularly proud of:

from the 1988 Elkhart, a video combining a Count Basie tribute (I recognize Bucky Pizzarelli, Milt Hinton, Joe Ascione, and Doc Cheatham!) and a set by the West End Jazz Band:

a Des Moines performance by Jim Beebe’s Chicago Jazz Band featuring Judi K, Connie Jones, and Spiegle:

and a particular favorite, two sets also from Elkhart, July 1988, a Condon memorial tribute featuring (collectively) Wild Bill Davison, Tommy Saunders, Chuck Hedges, George Masso, Dave McKenna, Marty Grosz, Milt Hinton, Rusty Jones, John Bany, Wayne Jones, in two sets:

Here are some other musicians you’ll see and hear: Bent Persson, Bob Barnard, Bob Havens, the Mighty Aphrodite group, the Cakewalkin’ Jazz Band, the Mills Brothers, Pete Fountain, Dick Hyman, Peter Appleyard, Don Goldie, Tomas Ornberg, Jim Cullum, Jim Galloway, Chuck Hedges, Dave McKenna, Max Collie, the Salty Dogs, Ken Peplowski, Randy Sandke, Howard Alden, Butch Thompson, Hal Smith, the Climax Jazz Band, Ernie Carson, Dan Barrett, Banu Gibson, Tommy Saunders, Jean Kittrell, Danny Barker, Duke Heitger, John Gill, Chris Tyle, Bob Wilber, Gene Mayl, Ed Polcer, Jacques Gauthe, Brooks Tegler, Rex Allen, Bill Dunham and the Grove Street Stompers, Jim Dapogny’s Chicago Jazz Band, the Harlem Jazz Camels, and so much more, more than I can type.

Many musicians look out into the audience and see people (like myself) with video cameras and sigh: their work is being recorded without reimbursement or without their ability to control what becomes public forever.  I understand this and it has made me a more polite videographer.  However, when such treasures like this collection surface, I am glad that people as devoted as Bob and Ruth Byler were there.  These videos — and more to come — testify to the music and to the love and generosity of two of its ardent supporters.

May your happiness increase!

TAPESTRY: A MUSICAL LANDSCAPE featuring AFRICVILLE STORIES and A SALUTE TO MOTOWN

Sometimes you measure the worth of an enterprise not by the names of the players on the bill — but by the hearts of the people behind the players.

It’s in that spirit that I call your attention to the Jazz Performance and Education Centre (JPEC) of Toronto, Canada.

Raymond and Rochelle Koskie saw that their beloved city had no full-time jazz venue, and in 2008, got people together — musicians, business people, and arts professionals, all passionate about jazz in Toronto — to create a solution, that city’s own version of Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York.

“This first-class, multi-purpose facility will feature performances by top local, national and international jazz talent; educational programming in which fans of all ages can learn about jazz; recording facilities; and a Hall of Fame and Archives which will encompass and preserve Canada’s outstanding jazz heritage and tradition. The facility will enhance Toronto’s reputation as one of the best cities in North America in which to experience live jazz.”

Starting in 2009-2010, JPEC held a Jazz Gala, featuring Archie Alleyne (drums), Peter Appleyard (vibes), Guido Basso (trumpet and flugelhorn), Arlene Duncan (vocals), Michael Dunstan (vocals), Molly Johnson (vocals), Jackie Richardson (vocals) and Joe Sealy (piano).  They have held concerts featuring Oliver Jones, Dianne Reeves, Ingrid Jensen, Kurt Rosenwinkel, and Bill Charlap/Renee Rosnes.  They’ve hosted lectures by local musicians and writers.  In 2010-11, five concerts featured Fred Hersch and Norma Winstone, Lee Konitz, Robert Glasper, and Seamus Blake.  The next year’s concerts offered Lionel Loeke, Lucien Ban and John Herbert, Tom Harrell, Luciana Souza and Romero Lubambo.

On February 23, 2013, the JPEC will hold its fourth Gala — TAPESTRY:

JPEC_1_2

I encourage you to attend, to support this enterprise, to follow your curiosity. Even if the names on the program aren’t familiar, the desire to bring jazz — living and creative — to a major city is worth investigating.  Learn more here.  And, yes, such endeavors cost money — but they might be the answer to the possibly bleak future of jazz performance in major cities as one can imagine it in twenty-five years, given the current facts.

May your happiness increase.

ALTERATIONS WHILE YOU WAIT: MARTY GROSZ, 1977

This lovely video performance is courtesy of the great jazz archivist (and musician) Bob Erwig — his YouTube channel is “erwigfilms” and it catches the irreplaceable Marty Grosz on Canadian television in 1977.  Marty’s accompanied by vibraphonist Peter Appleyard and Jim McHarg’s Metro Stompers in a version of THERE’LL BE SOME CHANGES MADE that starts off somberly, pensively, before jumping up and exulting:

SPARE CHANGE, ANYONE?  IT ALL GOES TO THE MUSICIANS: CLICK HERE!

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VBURVAWDMWQAS

WELCOME!

The very articulate Rochelle Koskie met me at Chautauqua and told me of a very worthy event at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto on October 1 — celebrating the inauguration of the JAZZ PERFORMANCE AND EDUCATION CENTRE of Toronto, with a musical gala in honor of Lincoln Alexander.  I didn’t know much about Alexander, but he is the first black Canadian to serve in a vice-regal position; he has been an influential political force for good.  And he is an ardent jazz fan!

I won’t supply all the details here but will say that the evening will include performances by Peter Appleyard, Guido Basso, Russ Little, Archie Alleyne, Joe Sealey, Arlene Duncan, Michael Dunstan, Molly Johnson, Jackie Richardson, Scott Alexander, Brian Barlow, Vern Dorge, Steve Mc Dade, Ted Quinlan, Michael Stuart, Tom Szcesniak, and Simon Walls — all Canadian jazz luminaries.

Those of us who remember CODA, who can recall when Toronto was host to world-famous players, will want to attend this event to support the JPEC, a not-for profit and charitable organization devoted to the preservation and continued development of jazz in Canada.  It promises to “inspire audiences through performances, education, workshops, and recordings,” and “will provide a Hall of Fame and Archive of Canadian and International Jazz History.” 

That’s worth supporting — and the gala evening ends with a dessert reception, always a good thing.  For more details, visit www.jazzcentre.ca.