Tag Archives: Shaye Cohn

SADNESS WILL BE GLADNESS, or THE JOYS OF SURRENDER: The EarRegulars Plus at The Ear Out, 326 Spring Street — JON-ERIK KELLSO, SHAYE COHN, JOHN ALLRED, JAMES CHIRILLO, NEAL CAINE (July 25, 2021)

Our culture celebrates victory, but sometimes giving in is the only way: this song dramatizes the surrender to love.

I SURRENDER, DEAR has an ache in its heart. (If you don’t know the classic versions by Bing and Louis, you owe it to yourself to visit them.) But sadness, whole-heartedly dramatized, is joy.

Thank the EarRegulars for this sustained burst of emotions, coming from The Ear Out (that’s located on Sunday afternoons from 1 to 3:30 in front of The Ear Inn, 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City). On July 25, 2021, they were Jon-Erik Kellso, Puje trumpet; John Allred, trombone; James Chirillo, guitar; Neal Caine, string bass, with NOLA guest Shaye Cohn, cornet, joining them, adding to the collective lyricism.

If you can, and you haven’t participated in these Sunday-afternoon musicales, you are seriously missing out. And you wouldn’t want to tell the grandchildren that you were too busy with the Times puzzle, would you?

May your happiness increase!

SO RICH, SO RARE: “LOVER, COME BACK TO ME,” by the EarRegulars Plus — JON-ERIK KELLSO, JOHN ALLRED, JAMES CHIRILLO, NEAL CAINE, SHAYE COHN — at The Ear Out, 326 Spring Street (July 25, 2021).

James Chirillo, Shaye Cohn, in action.

Who could resist such a request? Thank you, Sigmund Romberg, of course.

John Allred, Jon-Erik Kellso, Neal Caine, showing us how it’s done.

And thank the EarRegulars for this sustained joy from The Ear Out (that’s located on Sunday afternoons from 1 to 3:30 in front of The Ear Inn, 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City).

Where it happens — on Sunday afternoons, 1-3:30.

On July 25, 2021, they were Jon-Erik Kellso, Puje trumpet; John Allred, trombone; James Chirillo, guitar; Neal Caine, string bass, with NOLA guest Shaye Cohn, cornet, joining them. And here’s a masterpiece of chamber jazz, no exaggeration: solos, swing, ensemble telepathy, lyricism:

I’ve posted several other luminous performances from this session, with guests Jen Hodge, Josh Dunn, Rafael Castillo-Halvorssen, and Tamar Korn: THEM THERE EYES, IF I COULD BE WITH YOU ONE HOUR TONIGHT, and ONCE IN A WHILE. They don’t need explication, although they (and this burst of pleasures) remind me of someone from the UK — obviously deep into her own preferred variety of jazz — who used to comment on my postings, “Too swingy.”

She meant it as a criticism: I take it as the highest compliment.

The EarRegulars and friends deserve our most reverent thanks. And our physical presence: every Sunday afternoon from 1 to 3:30, at 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City.

And a self-referential postscript: in some unimagined context, should someone ask me, “Michael, what have you done with your life? I understand you were a college professor for decades . . .” I would point them to videos like this as the achievements I’m most proud of.

May your happiness increase!

EVERYBODY AT 326 SPRING STREET CAN REALLY DO THAT THING: The EarRegulars and Friends at The Ear Out — JON-ERIK KELLSO, SHAYE COHN, JOHN ALLRED, JAMES CHIRILLO, RAFAEL CASTILLO-HALVORSSEN, JOSH DUNN, JEN HODGE (July 25, 2021)

They make it look and sound so easy, which is one of the marks of great art — what Castiglione called “sprezzatura,” or an inspired nonchalance. Or, bcause it’s from the Louis book, it translates as “hot cosmology.” An extraordinarily lovely interlude by the EarRegulars plus guests, performed for all and sundry (did the passers-by feel the love as they trotted by?) on Sunday, July 25, 2021, at “The Ear Out,” in front of The Ear Inn, 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City.

The creators — bless them in long meter — are Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet; John Allred, trombone; James Chirillo, guitar; with Rafael Castillo-Halvorssen, trumpet; Shaye Cohn, cornet, Josh Dunn, guitar; Jen Hodge (sitting in for Neal Caine), string bass.

And their facial expressions will tell you their communal pleasure in the music they made float on the air.

“Hi, hi!” to quote Louis. Or to quote an enthusiastic friend of mine, “Wow wow wow.” More to come.

May your happiness increase!

INSPIRED NONCHALANCE at THE EAR OUT by The EarRegulars and Friends: JON-ERIK KELLSO, SHAYE COHN, RAFAEL CASTILLO-HALVORSSEN, JOHN ALLRED, JAMES CHIRILLO, JOSH DUNN, JEN HODGE (July 25, 2021)

By the time I began to attend live jazz happenings in New York City, 1970, the block of Fifty-Second Street once known as “Swing Street” had lost its marvelous coloration: banks and stores now stood where for, about a decade, there had been a line of jazz clubs where one could hear the most magnificent music, with musicians playing not only their own gigs but visiting others’. Ben, Bird, Billie, Big Sid, Bechet, Big T — among a hundred others. All that remained was a few dozen photographs and some record dates that tried to simulate the energies that bubbled up every night.

But in 2007, when Jon-Erik Kellso started a Sunday-night residency at The Ear Inn, 326 Spring Street, often with guitarist Matt Munisteri — the group was not yet called The EarRegulars — those sessions were the closest thing to Swing Street glories that I had ever seen, as the original quartet would delightfully grow with friends coming to add their voices to the swinging choir.

Since May of this year, Jon-Erik has been holding sessions outside The Ear Inn, and they provide the same emotional and aesthetic uplift. The music says in every note: We are not dead. We can still create joy. And we are happy to offer our wise feeling joy to you.

This happened again — most gloriously — on the afternoon of July 25 . . . a fairly quiet time in Soho, with many people having found some way to get out of the city. But those who remained in front of 326 Spring Street will, I propose, never forget what they saw and heard.

And the musicians were similarly transported: watching the performance that follows, please note the facial expressions of the musicians: Jen Hodge’s smile, James Chirillo’s approval, so evident, even behind the double mask. I’ve posted an exuberant sample from that day — the closing performance, THEM THERE EYES, featuring Tamar Korn — and here’s another wonder, James P. Johnson’s IF I COULD BE WITH YOU ONE HOUR TONIGHT:

They make it look and sound so easy, which is one of the marks of great art — what Castiglione called “sprezzatura,” or an inspired nonchalance. An extraordinarily lovely interlude by the EarRegulars plus guests, performed for all and sundry (did the passers-by feel the love as they trotted by?). The creators — bless them in long meter — are Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet; John Allred, trombone; James Chirillo, guitar; with Rafael Castillo-Halvorssen, trumpet; Shaye Cohn, cornet, Josh Dunn, guitar; Jen Hodge, sitting in for Neal Caine, string bass. Wondrous lyricism, a great feast of sounds for our ears and hearts.

I feel so much gratitude to them and their peers: I hope you feel it also.

May your happiness increase!

GREAT BIG EYES ON SPRING STREET: The EarRegulars, Irregularly — TAMAR KORN, SHAYE COHN, DANNY TOBIAS, JOHN ALLRED, JAMES CHIRILLO, NEAL CAINE, JOSH DUNN (July 25, 2021)

In front of 326 Spring Street, Soho, New York City, a shrine for friendly music and more.

Wondrous music was made (to quote Fratello JLC) in front of the Ear Inn on Sunday, July 25. If you were there, you know. If you weren’t, you can see and hear a sample now — created by the EarRegulars on their penultimate performance of the afternoon, THEM THERE EYES, featuring the regular EarRegulars for the day, John Allred, trombone; James Chirillo, guitar; Neal Caine, string bass, with irregular EarRegulars Tamar Korn, vocal; Shaye Cohn, cornet; Danny Tobias, trumpet; Josh Dunn, guitar.

Leader Jon-Erik Kellso and Rafael Castillo-Halvorsen, guest trumpet, sat this one out to not have an excess of brass – but you can imagine their grins. Oh, my!

Have you been? Joys await for those who can drop in. And there’s Sunday, August 1 . . . .

May your happiness increase!

SPLENDID DANCE MUSIC: “CE BIGUINE,” CHARLIE HALLORAN AND FRIENDS

You know the ancient joke, where someone asks, “Do you want a book for your birthday?” and the response is, politely, “No, thank you, I already have a book”? Had you asked me, “Would you like a CD with ten songs, none of them known to you, in a genre that you aren’t familiar with, performed by a group with only three musicians people you know (or know of)?” it would have been very easy to pretend to be busy cleaning up the kitchen and ignore the question.

But oh! would I have deprived myself of immense pleasures because of suspicious narrow provincialism.

The evidence is here: Charlie Halloran‘s new CD, devoted to music that isn’t officially “jazz” but that swings irresistibly down new paths.  Charlie’s summary is worth quoting in its entirety: Excited to release my new album of Caribbean music! Recorded straight to 78 rpm acetate disc, 1950s era biguines to liven up a cocktail party. Bottoms up!

And here you can enjoy the rhythms and sounds of this CD.

Charlie Halloran, 2017. Photograph by Jeffrey Dupuis.

I knew Charlie as a splendid trombonist and bandleader — this is his first CD as a leader.  So, without even hearing this CD, I wanted a copy because I have faith in Charlie as an intuitively gratifying creator of music.  And when I learned that the music had been recorded to 78 rpm acetate discs at Twerk Thomson’s studio, I knew it would be special.  (Here is the lowdown on Mr. T.)  The disc turns out to be a wonderfully rewarding travelogue and time machine: taking me places both musical and emotional that are very pleasing: hotel bar in the Caribbean, say, seventy years ago, as one of the people commenting on the disc has said.

I don’t know anything about the vernacular music of Martinique; I don’t know the names of the dances the songs inspire; I’ve never had a Planter’s Punch, and I certainly don’t even want to type the song list — so I hereby disqualify myself from any pseudo-informed comment.  But I assure you I’ve been wiggling in my computer chair, and if I had someone who was interested in wiggling on a more lavish scale, I wouldn’t be typing now, as this frolicsome music plays.  And I will say that someone interested in the multi-cultural roots of New Orleans music will find much to notice, study, and love here.

This post is shorter than usual not because of a lack of enthusiasm — no, quite the reverse! — but because I’d rather people hear the music than spend time reading my words.

Aside from Charlie (trampagne — his preferred spelling — and instigator), the musicians are Tomas Majcherski, clarinet; Zayd Sifri, percussion; Pete Olynciw, string bass; Doug Garrison and Robin Rappuzi, drums; Tom McDermott and Shaye Cohn, piano; Max Bein-Kahn, guitar; Todd Burdick, banjo.

It’s a wonderful disc, full of pleasures.  And for me, who sometimes feels hemmed in by similar repertoire, it is refreshing and inspiring.

May your happiness increase!