Tag Archives: translation

“BUGLE DISPOSITION RAG” — SAVORY TRANSLATIONS?

Newsweek: Exclusive clips from jazz greats

2. “Bugle disposition Rag”: Count Basie’s 1940 ensemble, featuring substance instrumentalist Lester Young, on a set this adornment never transcribed in the studio, on March 8, 1940. Personnel: author Clayton (tp, arr); Harry “Sweets” Edison, Al Killian, Ed adventurer (tp); Vic Dickenson, Dan Minor, Dicky author (tb); Tab adventurer (as, sop, arr); peer Warren (as); Lester Young, Buddy poet (ts); Jack pedagogue (as,bar); Count Basie (p); Freddie Green (g); director Page (b); Jo designer (d).

I know what Bessie Smith would have said about this!  This excerpt came from www.flashnewsworld.com. and is its very own kind of jive.  Brilliance comes through no matter what amiable violence is done to the language: Google translation has at least recognized that the men of the Basie band were adventurers, authors, designers, and poets.  And what they played was always an adornment. 

“RECORD TREASURES (2) MARTY GROSZ”

The syntax is sometimes baffling (thanks to Google translation from the Japanese) but the intent is clear, and it’s one I share — to celebrate and honor Martin Oliver Grosz, as well as his wonderful (and extremely rare) 1951 records with Dick Wellstood, Frank Chace, Pops Foster, Tommy Benford, Ephie Resnick, and Hugh McKay:

Record treasures (2) Marty Grosz
September 3, 2000 (Sun), Marty Gross charity concert was held in Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Art.
Why, you might reasonably be thought to concerts at the museum. Actually, the father of gross, but was born in Germany, continued to criticize the German caricaturist George Grosz’s largest Century 20 (real name: George Gross 1898-1959) is the.From August 6 to September to the 24th, the exhibition has been held by George Grosz, Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Art, Sept. 3, the concert is not held as one of the event Marty Gross.
Gross, now ages 20, 30 in the leading jazz and classical repertoire’s primary, has been active on the world stage as an arch-top guitar virtuoso.On the day, the Tsukuba depart 8:40 minutes, if all goes well I will get to Utsunomiya sometimes 12. Joban Line in injury Tsuchiura But straight out of a whopping three hours late! Start of the concert arrived 10 minutes before the museum was 2:50 minutes.So I became a part of stand. Year 1929 made by Gibson L-5 (16inch gold hardware in the body) have appeared in gloss, CD follows a familiar song and we sang and played. Still raw L-5 was a really good sound.The second part, and to return to families with young children could sit in the front. 2 meters before the closely watched technique was a good shout. No.1 song in the popular vote in the ability of power, now 70 years old and is unbelievably great, energetic two hours.After the concert, I went to see the gloss. People who bought the CD only, beating restrained by staff that差Shi出Shimashita two copies of the records SP Gross. Was surprised when I can not forget that face. Records this SP, June 6, 1951, which was recorded in New York, Gross was the first session will be 21 years old. In this session, and view photos Gross tenor (4 string), seems to play the guitar.

The time to migrate to the LP era, this record is the end of SP Gross and I have only two copies.
Historically, the record was one of my treasures, treasures risen in the ranks of the sign of the day.(2000.9.4)


Mart Gross & the Cellar Boys
(Jolly Roger 2003)

Mart Gross & the Cellar Boys
(Jolly Roger 2004)

Gross said during performance
Marty Grosz with Gibson L-5
(Photo: Dr. Yanagisawa)

(From left) After the concert, around the Gross
Seya Yanagisawa Mr. Hasegawa said Mr. Yamada, Mr. Gross’s exit
(Photo: Dr. Yanagisawa)

The original site, for those fluent in Japanese, is http://www.sakura.cc.tsukuba.ac.jp/~jazzsp/topic/rare2.htm.

“THE ODOR OF POPULARITY”

This biography of  Sidney Catlett comes directly from http://www.jazzandroots.com/big-sid-catlett.html.  I credit the original site — the “Jazz and Roots Club” found in Shrewsbury, England (I presume) so that readers know I am reporting rather than inventing. 

 Big Sid Catlett, was one of the large battery the swing era and one of the few who crossed stylistic boundaries smoothly without loss of quality would suffer. Born in Indiana and learned to play the piano as a child before the school band will pass to the battery.

He began his career in Chicago in the late twenties before moving to New York at the time of the Great Depression. His first serious contact with jazz came when he worked for Benny Carter’s orchestra in 1932. From that experience, he found work easily and well spent by the best swing bands of the time between most notably those of Louis Armstrong and Fletcher Henderson.

 

Possessor of a light rhythm and full of swing, was able to adapt their style to each soloist who accompanied him. He was admired in his time by the general public who flocked to the ballrooms and dress, elegant, classic and fun at the same time, helped him be the focus of attention among the young. As a musician he felt at ease in any situation and in any format and was one of the first battery of swing who played with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker.

It is remarkable in its contribution to the combos that organized the great clarinetist, Benny Goodman and his final year career before he died following a heart attack, was with “All Star” by Louis Armstrong where he spent his last years in the odor of popularity.

Now I understand much more than I did.  The reason for Sidney’s wondrous inventiveness was his large battery (more volts, more swing).  And he never lost quality while crossing stylistic boundaries (are those crossings rather like going through Customs at the border or more like passing through the metal detector at the airport?).  Finally — there’s something in the air.  A scent, light, elusive, entrancing.  Not Chanel; not fresh hot coffee; not the scent of new-mown hay: no!  It’s the odor of popularity. 

I’m always glad to see that anyone’s paying attention to my heroes, but word-for-word translation has its limits.

FRENCH WIKIPEDIA MEETS (AND CONQUERS) DAVE TOUGH: MORE JAZZ MANGLISH

While I was searching for the one film clip in which Dave Tough can be seen, I found this biography, reproduced here exactly as it appears on the web.  Remarkable, ne c’est pas?  Incidentally, I know just how difficult it is to speak or write correctly and gracefully in one language, let alone two.  But the prose here goes beyond the starship Enterprise, I think.

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Dave Tough (David Jarvis Tough) is a Batteur of American Jazz , born the March 26th 1908 with Oaks Park (Illinois) and dead the December 6th 1948 with Newark (New Jersey).

Biography

Dice its more young age, Dave Tough knows health issues. He suffers indeed from epilepsy. Dave Tough makes its beginning musical in 1925 in Austin High School Gang at the sides of Bud Freeman, Frank Teschmac her and Eddie Condon. He plays in some minor groups before making a round in Europe, in 1927-1928, with “New Yorkers”. In France, it occurs with Mezz Mezzrow. Of return to the the United States, he plays in the orchestra of Red Nichols (1928-1930). Between 1932 and 1935, its health issues oblige it to stop its career. In addition, Dave Tough drinks much, which is not to arrange the things and regularly will pose problems to him.
It takes again its career in 1936, playing successively in the orchestras of Tommy Dorsey (1936-1937, then at the end of 1938), Bunny Berigan (1938), Benny Goodman (1938), Joe Marsala (1939, then 1940-1941), Jack Teagarden (1940), Bud Freeman (1940), Artie Shaw (1941-1942), Charlie Spivak (1942), Woodie Hermann (1942). During the Second world war, he plays in a military jazz band depend on the “Navy” and directed by Artie Shaw (1942-1944). After war, one finds it at Woody Hermann (1944-1945), then again at Joe Marsala (1945-1946). Its health issues impose frequent cuts in its engagements to him. In 1946, it settles as musician “free lance” with New York. One can hear it accompanying Eddie Condon or the troop by JATP of Norman Granz. In 1947, it has its last engagements near Charlie Ventura, Bill Harris and finally Muggsy Spanier. At the end of 1947, it is neat in the “New Jersey Veterans’ hospital”. He dies of the continuations of an accidental fall.
Dave Tough was in addition chromiquor for the review “Metronome” and is the author of a method of battery. One can foresee it in the film “Earl Carroll Vanities” (1945).

Style

Dave Tough was a fine and atypical beater. Whereas many its contemporaries (like Gene Krupa, for example) often devoted themselves to solos with the spectacular visual aspect, Dave Tough concentrated on the aspect ” accompaniment rythmique” instrument. Its play with the Balais was in particular particularly subtle.
One can read an excellent analysis of his style, in=2 0the pages which are devoted to him in the remarkable work “a History of the Battery Jazz. Volume 1” of Georges Paczinsky with the editions In addition to Mesure (1999).

External bond

  • Biography with photographs.
Random links: 1951 | Too Tough to Die | David Rumsey | The Maccabees | Enrique Buenaventura


© 2007-2008 speedlook.com; article text available under the terms of GFDL, from fr.wikipedia.org


JAZZ MANGLISH 3

When a Japanese record label issued collections of Lee Wiley’s live recordings, they generously provided these versions of famous lyrics:

“I’ve got a crush on you, weedy pine.”

Nothing can happen to me anymore / I’m writing turkeys all over my door.”

Thanks to Scott Robinson for these gems.