Tag Archives: Twenties jazz

“YOUR FAVORITE COLLEGIATES!”: THE ORIGINAL CORNELL SYNCOPATORS MAKE THEIR NEW YORK CITY DEBUT at THE TRIAD THEATER (September 28, 2018)

Enthusiasm, precision, and love are qualities that the Original Cornell Syncopators brought to their New York debut at the Triad Theater on West 72nd Street.

“Direct from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, your favorite collegiates, the Original Cornell Syncopators, bring you Hot Jazz from the 1920s and 30s to the Triad Theater! Music includes songs by King Oliver, Bix Beiderbecke, the New Orleans Rhythm Kings, Paul Specht, The Original Prague Syncopated Orchestra, Bennie Moten and more!”

This joyous young band is not only curious about where the music we love came from, but righteously works to make sure it doesn’t get dusty.  They delve into “all of jazz’s earliest forms, from its first recorded sounds, to the roots of Swing and beyond.”

Can you tell I admire and love this band and that it was a joy to see and hear them in Manhattan?  (I’ll see them again — and you can too — at the San Diego Jazz Fest.  You could come, too.)

Here are four of my rather informal videos: Colin tells me that professional videos and a CD issue of this concert are coming . . . a great pleasure.

The “Syncs,” as they jovially call themselves, are Colin Hancock, cornet, clarinet, vocals; Lior Kreindler, trumpet, vocals; Dave Connelly, trumpet; Rishi Verma, trombone; Kieran Loehr, alto saxophone, clarinet; Stephen Newcomb, alto and baritone saxophone, clarinet; Troy Anderson, tenor saxophone, clarinet; Clare Burhenne, tenor and baritone saxophone, vocals; Uche Chukwukere, violin;
Robbert Van Renesse, banjo, guitar, vocals; Christina Li, piano; Noah Li, drums;
Sarah Cohn-Manick, tuba.  And, remarkably, not one of them is majoring in music at Cornell . . . so they have (as we say) other strings to their bow.

I WONDER WHAT’S BECOME OF JOE sports a fervent vocal by Clare and superb ensemble work by the OCS:

SWEET LIKE THIS is a melancholy 1929 King Oliver rumination:

ECCENTRIC summons up the New Orleans Rhythm Kings, always welcome:

And BLUE (or BLUE AND BROKENHEARTED) is homage to the Goodman – McPartland hot ballad:

This just in!  SYNCS TAKE TO THE PARK!  (Who said jazz musicians are solely nocturnal?)

May your happiness increase!

 

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LONDON’S HOTTEST RHYTHM JUGGLERS: THE VITALITY FIVE, “SYNCOPATION GONE MAD”

I’ve had an alarm clock / clock radio at the side of my bed for decades now, and its message is unvarying and irritating. Time to go to school!  Time to go to work! Time to move the car to avoid a ticket! 

But playing the new CD by The Vitality Five, its title noted above, I thought if I could rig up a musical machine that would, at first softly, play one of their glorious lively evocations of a vanished time, I would be much more willing to get out of bed and face the world.

The Vitality 5 is inherently not the same as many other bands performing Twenties hot repertoire.  For one thing, the 5’s reach is informed and deep: of the seventeen songs on this disc, perhaps four will be well-known to people who “like older jazz.”  Be assured that even the most “obscure” tunes are melodic and memorable.  More important to me is the 5’s perhaps unstated philosophy in action.  Many bands so worship the originals that they strive to create reverent copies of the original discs, and in performance this can be stunning.  But the 5 realizes something in their performances and arrangements that, to me, is immensely valuable: the people who made the original records were animated by joyous exuberance.

The players we venerate were “making it up as they went along,” as if their lives depended on it.  Theirs did, and perhaps ours do as well.

So these performances are splendidly animated by vivacious personality: they leap off the disc.  I don’t mean that the 5 is louder or faster, but they are energized.  You can’t help but hear and feel it.

Facts.  The band has been together since 2015, and it is that rare and wonderful entity — a working band.  Two of its members should be intimate pals to JAZZ LIVES readers: David Horniblow, reeds, and Andrew Oliver, piano — they are the one and only Complete Morton Project.  The other three members who complete the arithmetic are special heroes of mine, people I’ve admired at the Whitley Bay / Mike Durham jazz parties: Michael McQuaid, reeds and cornet; Martin Wheatley, banjo; Nicholas D. Ball, drums.

And they are superb players — not only star soloists, but wonderful in ensemble, making the 5 seem much more a flexible orchestra than the single digit would suggest.  They are, as Louis would say, Top Men On Their Instruments.  Each performance has its own rhythmic surge, the arrangements are varied without being “clever,” and the band is wise enough to choose material that has a deep melodic center — memorable lines that range in performance from sweetly lyrical to incendiary.  The back cover proclaims that there are “17 CERTAIN DANCE HITS!” and it’s true.

A final word about repertoire — a subject whose narrowing I find upsetting, as some “Twenties” groups play and replay the same dozen songs: this disc offers songs I’d either never heard before (JI-JI BOO) or not in decades (THE SPHINX) as well as classics that aren’t simply transcriptions from the OKeh (FIREWORKS, EVERY EVENING, COPENHAGEN) — across the spectrum from Nichols-Mole to Clarence Williams to McKinney’s Cotton Pickers and more.

I know it’s heresy to some, but the Vitality 5 performs at a level that is not only equal to the great recordings, but superior to them.  A substantial claim, but the disc supports it.

Visit here to hear their hot rendition of COPENHAGEN — also, here you can buy an actual disc or download their music.  Convinced?  I hope so.

And to the Gentlemen of the Ensemble: if you perfect the Vitality Five Rise-and-Shine machine, suitable for all electric currents, do let me know.  I’ll be your first purchaser.  Failing that, please prosper, have many gigs, and make many CDs!

May your happiness increase!

HOTTER THAN THE DEVIL’S KITCHEN: DAVID BOEDDINGHAUS and his BOYS at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY: ANDY SCHUMM, KRISTOFFER KOMPEN, MAURO PORRO, SPATS LANGHAM, MALCOLM SKED, JOSH DUFFEE, MATTHIAS SEUFFERT (November 8, 2014)

David Boeddinghaus is a superb pianist and arranger, but I’ve never had the pleasure of watching him time-travel back to the Twenties in ways exuberant and exact.  Here he is at the 2014 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, with Andy Schumm, cornet; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Mauro Porro, Matthias Seuffert [only on SHE’S CRYING FOR ME], reeds; Spats Langham, banjo; Malcolm Sked, brass bass; Josh Duffee, drums.

SHE’S CRYING FOR ME:

FIREWORKS (harking back to the Original Memphis Five, not Louis and Earl):

A JAZZ HOLIDAY:

FRESHMAN HOP (all hail Jack Pettis!):

WALKIN’ THE DOG (in honor of Carmichael’s Collegians):

What fine hot music they make.  And there’s more to come in November 2015 at

the Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party.

May your happiness increase!

ANDY SCHUMM COMES ON (IN TWO TAKES)

Good news!  Andy Schumm, the sterling cornetist, is making a New York visit.  He’ll be playing at The Ear Inn this coming Sunday (October 24) with our other delightful visitor from afar Dan Barrett, Matt Munisteri, Scott Robinson on bass sax — a heavenly jazz crew!  And no doubt other New York friends and admirers who have their horns with them.  That’s 326 Spring Street from 8-11 PM. 

I confess that I would like the Ear to be jammed with sympathetic wise listeners who sit reverently and know that SUSIE (OF THE ISLANDS) was issued in two takes.  But I hope the throng of admiring Bixians will save me a seat at the bar, too. 

And — long-term good news — Andy’s just started his own website: www.andyschumm.com.  You can see what a pleasure and resource it’s going to be — not just the usual LOOK AT ME! extravaganza.  Andy wants to make his site a place where people can chat about their jazz interests, share their discoveries, get answers to their questions — which will be valuable indeed.  Do take a look!

“BLUE BLOOD BLUES”: SPENCER’S NIGHTHAWKS

I’ve been listening to a five-disc set called JAZZ MAGIC featuring cornetist Carl Spencer and his bands.  Between 1964 and 1972, Spencer led a small hot group called the Washboard Kings which devoted itself to a wide range of music — from early pop and jazz to the earliest Thirties.  After an extended hiatus, Spencer reformed his band as Carl Spencer’s Nighthawks Orchestra and it’s continuing to gig as I write this. 

Spencer’s bands have impresssed me both by their wide range (the musicians are comfortable playing the repertoire of the Creole Jazz Band, Bix Beiderbecke, Luis Russell, and pop music of the day — TAKE YOUR GIRLIE TO THE MOVIES IF YOU CAN’T MAKE LOVE AT HOME for one example) and their relaxed authenticity.  They know the Twenties styles well and can improvise within these idioms. 

Here’s a YouTube clip of two of Spencer’s star reed players working their way through Morton’s BLUE BLOOD BLUES.  This was recorded at the 2001 Bude Jazz Festival and features Brian Hills and Mac White, clarinets; Henry Davis, piano; Mike Parle, banjo; Roger Graham,  tuba; Tim Philips, drums.

JAZZ MAGIC contains 122 tracks, drawn from studio sessions and live performances, with guest features for pianists Martin Litton and Neville Dickie, banjoist / singer Spats Langham, and others — a delightfully varied assortment that deserves to be better known.  Visit  www.spencersnighthawks.com for more information on the band and on JAZZ MAGIC.

IMAGINE THIS!

This was one prize — of several — acquired yesterday at the Coxsackie Antique Center, a multi-dealer showplace near Albany, New York, with a hundred dealers.  Walking up and down the aisles, although the large store was clean and well-lit, which isn’t always the case, I began to be grateful that there were so many things I had no desire whatsoever to collect. 

But this piece of sheet music — new to me! — suggests that hipness didn’t restrict itself to major urban centers in 1927 or after — or perhaps someone brought this from New York City to play on the piano at the summer house?  My photographs of the score might be too small to play from, but perhaps my readers can solve this for themselves. 

Quinoa  butterfly  Fud 011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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IMAGINATION is an unusually modern piece for 1927, harmonically sophisticated — but unless you can sight-read, you might not know what it sounds like. 

Voila!  The Bix Beiderbecke Discussion Group (http://www,bixbeiderbecke.com.) once again came to the rescue.  There I found a good deal of information about Fud Livingston — composer, arranger, reedman — as well as audio versions of IMAGINATION by bands including Red Nichols, Miff Mole, Vic Berton, and other Twenties hot stars.  (I hope that Professor Al Haim agrees that my petty larceny was done for a good purpose.)   

IMAGINATION by Miff Mole and his Molers, August 30, 1927

IMAGINATION by the Charleston Chasers, Sept. 8, 1927

IMAGINATION by Red Nichols and his Five Pennies, June 1, 1928

Note: these files occasionally take some time to load; sometimes they stall; they require Real Player.  But they do reward the patient and diligent. 

To repay the Bixophiles for my borrowing these recordings from their site, here’s another piece of sheet music, also new to me, with distinct ties to Bix and Tram.  More to come! 

Quinoa  butterfly  Fud 010