Tag Archives: Victory Pub

“AN ORDER OF HOT, PLEASE, SIR!”: NOTES FROM THE VICTORY PUB, NEWCASTLE, UK (October 26, 2017)

“Chris and Chris” at the 2015 Steamboat Stomp in New Orleans. Photograph by Bess Wade.

I couldn’t make it to this year’s Mike Durham Classic Jazz Party, but my place as videographer has been filed nobly by a number of people, which is reassuring.  You can find their works on YouTube, but here is one performance so glorious that I wanted to share it with you.  The video is the work of my comrade Chris Jonsson — he’s half of the friendly team of “Chris and Chris,” the other half being Anne-Christine Persson (both snappy dressers as well who make all the hot festivals).  Chris Jonsson carries a video camera — low and unobtrusive — and has a YouTube channel called CANDCJ.

One of the highlights of the Party is the nightly jam sessions in the Victory Pub, where this year, they managed to get a small piano in, making the music even more true-to-life.  Chris captured hours of the “formal” sets, but the five selections he recorded in the Pub seem — to me, at least — even more thrilling. Here’s ONCE IN A WHILE, the Hot Five classic, played with immense energy and joy by some people I admire greatly: Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Torstein Kubban, cornet; Lars Frank, reeds; Phil Rutherford, tuba; Jacob Ullberger, banjo; Morten Gunnar Larsen, piano.  And how fiercely they swing!

Thanks to five musicians and one gifted archivist.  And to Louis, of course.  An aside: proven morale-boosters and mood-enhancers (pick your jargon) for me are the company of people I love, caffeine, and anything associated with Louis.  I hope you feel better, too.

And a postscript.  This performance is hot enough to have ignited something, which reminded me that at the 2014 Party there was a fire in the Victory Pub, and we had to leave the hotel for a time.  The music that resulted when we returned is one of my favorite memories: you can see it here.

May your happiness increase!

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WHERE I’VE BEEN, AND WHAT I HEARD (November 5, 2015)

There won’t be much prose in this blogpost: a seventeen-hour travel day has a way of overpowering ordinary cognition (Newcastle to Amsterdam to New York to home, including a taxi, two planes, two airports, a shuttle, and a drive home in rush hour).

But I wanted to let the JAZZ LIVES faithful know that I hadn’t decided to abandon them or the blog.   I will have something to say about the glorious cabaret evening that singer Janice Day and pianist Martin Litton put on in Hay-on-Wye.  And I assure you I will have much more to say about the Mike Durham Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, which is still ringing beautifully in my ears.

Nick Ball and Josh Duffee in the Victory Pub, November 2015, at the Party

Nick Ball and Josh Duffee in the Victory Pub, November 2015, at the Party

But music speaks louder than words, as Charlie Parker reminded Earl Wilson. So here’s a sample from the Thursday, November 5, 2015, after-hours jam session at the Victory Pub in the Village Hotel Newcastle . . . on RIVERBOAT SHUFFLE.

The energized participants are Torstein Kubban, cornet; Frans Sjostrom, bass saxophone; Thomas Winteler, clarinet; David Boeddinghaus, piano; Jacob Ullberger, banjo; Nick Ball, drums:

The Party will go on in 2016, but it needs you to survive and flourish.  So do make a note of that, in honor of hot jazz, in honor of Hoagy and Bix too.

May your happiness increase!

MARMALADE. YES, PLEASE. (Nov. 3, 2013)

Not this.

Marmalade jar

Or these.

Marmalade kittens

You’re getting warmer.

Marmalade ODJB

Almost there.

Marmalade Bix

But what follows is nothing historical, and it exists in the twenty-first century: CLARINET MARMALADE, played with exuberant Bix-and-Tram-and-Rollini brilliance at a jam session.

To me, this performance is so hot that it should have CAUTION! in its title — near the end of the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party, a hot session in the Victory Pub of the Village Hotel Newcastle, featuring Torstein Kubban, cornet; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Andy Schumm, C-melody saxophone; Lars Frank, clarinet; Claus Jacobi, bass sax [the one and only belonging to Frans Sjostrom], Morten Gunnar Larsen, keyboard; Jacob Ullberger, banjo; Josh Duffee, drums; various unidentified dancers and pedestrians.

Recorded on November 3 or perhaps the morning of November 4, 2013 — I cn no longer remember!

I know that this exuberance will happen again at this year’s Party — which is coming around the corner in fourth gear — as it has happened every year I’ve been there. (It begins on the evening of Thursday, November 6, 2014, which is a week away.  I should begin to pack now.)

Since absurdity appeals to me almost as much as does hot jazz, I have to tell JAZZ LIVES readers that when I was documenting this video on YouTube, various helpful terms appeared at the bottom of the page to be considered as tags.  One of them (understandably) was “fruit preserves.”  Indeed.

See you in the Victory Pub, I hope.

And for another three minutes of Torstein, Lars, and Kris, here’s this lovely hot too-brief interlude on MELANCHOLY (with a serenely self-absorbed still photographer to bring the fun to an abrupt close):

May your happiness increase!

MORE FROM THE JAM SESSION at the WHITLEY BAY CLASSIC JAZZ PARTY: ANDY SCHUMM, MATTHIAS SEUFFERT, LARS FRANK, KRISTOFFER KOMPEN, STEPHANE GILLOT, JEFF BARNHART, JACOB ULLBERGER, HENRI LEMAIRE, JOSH DUFFEE, BEN CUMMINGS (November 1, 2013)

It was dark in the Victory Pub, located in the middle of the Village Newcastle hotel — the site of the 2013 Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party — after the regular mini-concerts had concluded. But jazz players thrive in the dark.

And although the Classic Jazz Party successfully evokes and sometimes reproduces the great jazz performances of the past, sometimes I think the deepest evocations of jazz’s free-wheeling spirit happen after hours, where there isn’t a manuscript page in sight.

Collectively, the expert roisters were Andy Schumm, cornet; Jeff Barnhart, keyboard; Kristoffer Kompen, trombone; Stephane GIllot, alto saxophone; Lars Frank, Matthias Seuffert, tenor saxophone; Jacob Ullberger, guitar; Henri Lemaire, string bass, Josh Duffee, drums. Ben Cummings, trumpet. Other luminaries may be there, audible but hardly visible. If I’ve omitted anyone, I do apologize and offer to make corrections and reparations. It was delightful to be there; it delights me to revisit these videos; and I am delighted to think of being at the Classic Jazz Party in November 2014.

I SURRENDER, DEAR:

WHO?:

A SMOOTH ONE:

SWING THAT MUSIC:

AT SUNDOWN:

As I was packing up my camera (my eyelids were falling down — it’s a long day behind the video camera!) they had launched into a short, emotive NEW ORLEANS, and then a version of I’M A DING DONG DADDY that owed a good deal to SLIM’S JAM . . . if you can imagine it.  See you at the 2014 Classic Jazz Party, which will begin with a jam session / concert by the Union Rhythm Kings on Thursday, November 6, 2014.  Not to be missed.

May your happiness increase!

MORE LIGHTNING IN THE DARK: JAMMING AT WHITLEY BAY 2013 (Part One)

I don’t quite know what it is like when the music isn’t being created there, but the Victory Pub in the Village Hotel Newcastle (UK) has become a small shrine for Hot music when the Whitley Bay Classic Jazz Party is in session — a once-yearly transformation into a place where dreams come true.

Here’s the second half of WASHBOARD WIGGLES, with Jeff Barnhart, keyboard / vocals; Bent Persson, Torstein Kubban, cornet; Graham Hughes, trombone; Lars Frank, reeds; Jacob Ullberger, banjo; Frans Sjostrom, bass saxophone:

Then, the Master stopped in — Norman Field and his clarinet — for a romp on LITTLE GIRL (with the verse and a characteristically buoyant Jeff Barnhart vocal):

We don’t like to talk about Buddy behind his back, but we must — BUDDY’S HABITS:

More of the good stuff — The Good Stuff — is on the way. And a cinematographic postscript: if you can, while watching on YouTube, boost the settings (where the little gear or toothed wheel is) to the highest — 1o80 — and watch full screen. That way you will find, no matter what Gertrude Stein said, there is a there there!

May your happiness increase!

THE SECOND WHITLEY BAY JAM SESSION (July 10, 2010)

Jam sessions don’t always work out.  But the one that took place in the Victory Pub on Saturday, July 10, 2010, during the Whitley Bay International Jazz Festival, succeeded nobly.  And I stopped finding the television screens distracting as soon as the music began. 

The core group, “Doc’s Night Owls,” remained — and grew.  Michel Bastide, cornet; Matthias Seuffert, reeds; Jacob Ullberger, banjo; Christian LeFevre, brass bass, Martin Seck, washboard, were joined by Mike Durham, trumpet and master organizer; Andy Schumm, cornet; Ian Smith, cornet; Jean-Francois Bonnel, reeds; Attila Korb, trombone; Nicolas Montier, alto sax . . . and various gifted enthusiastic players.  I apologize to anyone I haven’t identified above: it’s not discourtesy, but having my hands full (thus taking poor notes).  And the players at a jam session don’t always introduce themselves.  So I will add identifications if and when they are supplied!

Perhaps owing to the previous set, the repertoire had a deep Twenties feel.  They began with the Dodds classic, FORTY AND TIGHT.  A prize to the reader(s) who can unravel the etymology of that slang praise.  “Tight,” I can certainly guess at, but “forty” as an accolade?  Research! — while the music is playing, please:

The next song was again associated with Johnny Dodds (and in more recent times, Soprano Summit), OH, DADDY (with or without comma or exclamation point, the meaning is clear):

In memory of Clarence Williams, Alberta Hunter, Sidney Bechet, and Louis Armstrong, someone suggested CAKE WALKING BABIES FROM HOME (although there were no titanic solo duels here — the atmosphere was more friendly than combative):

With Andy Schumm in evidence, there is always the possibility that the Twenties will include that young fellow from Davenport, Iowa, whose shade surfaced most pleasingly for SAN.  How nice that this band knew the verse as well:

And the last song I captured was (and is) a good old good one from the Midwest, full of sweet sentiment, MY GAL SAL (by Paul Dresser, brother of the more celebrated novelist Theodore Dreiser — I prefer Paul’s works to his brother’s, but that’s a purely personal statement — they get to the point more quickly and with greater effectiveness):

The collective ensemble began AT THE JAZZ BAND BALL — which, in retrospect, I regret having missed — but my video-taping arm had begun to quiver and I feared the rest of me would shortly follow suit.  But I hope that these videos suggest some of the delicious enthusiasm and deep artistry that ruled this evening.  Victory indeed!

JAMMIN’ AT WHITLEY BAY (July 9, 2010)

Jazz musicians know that great truth: if you stay up late, you can always sleep tomorrow. 

Although the players at a jazz party might seem to have an exhausting schedule, many of them are fueled by the encounters with their peers and heroes — thus, an after-hours jam session often happens.  I was lucky enough to be awake for this one and have a fully-charged video camera.  The session took place at the “Victory Pub” in the Village Hotel Newcastle, the comfortable home base for the Whitley Bay International Jazz Party.  

Of course the seating arrangement scattered musicians here and there, and several flat-screen televisions remained on through the session, but the music was the focus here. 

The musicians who began the session were an organized band — a great one: Michael McQuaid’s Late Hour Boys: Michael and Jason Downes on reeds, John Scurry on guitar, Mark Elton on drums, Ian Smith on drums and washboard.  Then they were joined by Graham Hughes (from London) on trombone, and other gifted jammers.    

FORTY AND TIGHT comes from the Johnny Dodds book, and its title is a slang expression for something (or someone) who is splendidly gratifying.  How naughty the coinage is I don’t know; talk among yourselves:

MAMA INEZ certainly has a rocking, irresistible  beat:

Then, they were joined by a friend from the land of Oz — the fine trumpet player and singer Geoff Bull, who nudged them into SOME OF THESE DAYS:

Thinking of Louis, Jeff Barnhart unsheathed the keyboard and sang ROCKIN’ CHAIR:

But that might have been too mournful for a jubilant occasion, so they swung into another Louis-Hoagy connection, JUBILEE, which certainly did make the rafters ring / up to Heaven:

Bassist Henri Lamaire and drummer Josh Duffee joined the festivities and Geoff suggested the pretty THANKS A MILLION, again reaching back to the Thirties Louis book (or perhaps as homage to Dick Powell, who introduced the song in “the film of the same name”):

And the session concluded with a romping JUNE NIGHT, with pianist Martin Seck and a host of other musicians joining in (again, I’ll happily credit them by name if informed).  My hat’s off to Geoff Bull, who certainly knows how to get everyone going in the right direction with inspiring riffs.  And the wonderful solos are surely sparked by Josh’s exuberant drumming:

And here’s a very musical solo from Josh to wrap things up in a swinging way:

If you weren’t already convinced, I think this session is further proof that good things happen in the dark.