Tag Archives: Vito Dieterle

WITH TENDERNESS: THEN, NOW, SOON (JOEL FORRESTER, VITO DIETERLE, MATT GARRITY, DAVE HOFSTRA)

JOEL FORRESTER, photograph by Metin Oner

Some more music from my hero Joel Forrester, captured live at Cleopatra’s Needle on August 3, 2017, which is the THEN of the title.  Joel brought with him Vito Dieterle, tenor saxophone; Dave Hofstra, string bass; Matt Garrity, drums (and other noble participants, their identities to be revealed in future JAZZ LIVES’ posts).

Two selections struck me most strongly as wordless evocations of tenderness, overlaid with grief.  The first, YOUR LITTLE DOG, Joel’s elegy for a beloved pet, is incomplete: I arrived late to this Musical Offering and the quartet was taking its leisurely melancholy route through this composition, one of Joel’s that is most dear to me. Here is the closing minute.  I wish I’d arrived earlier, but this minute-plus remains emotionally powerful:

Later in the evening, Joel and the quartet offered a slow ballad, ABOUT FRANCOISE, which has much of the same mood:

I’ve lingered over these two performances because they present a sound, a mood, a tempo that I don’t always encounter, in a world where some musicians feel pressured to be brighter, quicker, more attention-getting.  Joel and friends know that music that mourns can also elate and uplift, and I hope you feel those emotions here.

That was THEN, as they say.  The NOW is, of course, the minutes you are spending absorbing the sounds.

SOON is not yet here as I write this, but it will come  . . .  you know the rest.

Joel, Vito, and Dave have a new trio gig in Riverdale, New York, this coming Sunday, which is September 10, from 3 to 7 PM, at MON AMOUR, a coffee-and-wine cafe at 234 West 238th Street, two doors to the east of Broadway.  Take the #1 train to 238 (its penultimate station stop) and you are THERE. No cover or music charge. 

And Joel has promised me a full version of YOUR LITTLE DOG for my camera and my audience.  You could spend Sunday afternoon searching for your autumn-winter wardrobe, but that can wait a few days.

Something relevant and perhaps not coincidental: I am reading with great pleasure OPEN CITY, the 2011 debut novel by Teju Cole — the book a gift from tenor saxophonist Sam Taylor, and after beginning this blog, I had to leave my computer but could take the book with me.  The narrator says, early on, of a younger friend in his neighborhood, “My friend was especially passionate about jazz. Most of the names and styles that he so delighted in meant little to me (there are apparently number of great jazz musicians from the sixties and seventies with the last name Jones).  But I could sense, even from my ignorant distance, the sophistication of his ear.  He often said that he would sit down at a piano someday and show me how jazz worked, and that when I finally understood blue notes and swung notes, the heavens would part and my life would be transformed.  I more than half believed him . . . ” (24-25).

Cole’s words echo Forrester’s “tunes.”

May your happiness increase!

Advertisements

NEW BAND, NEW SPOT, NEW JOYS: DENNIS LICHTMAN, JAKE SANDERS, JARED ENGEL at THE DJANGO (February 18, 2016)

The Django Time Out

Three different kinds of delight intermingling and coalescing: the pleasure of a new lyrical / hot jazz ensemble, the Lichtman – Sanders – Engel trio (that’s Dennis Lichtman on clarinet / electric mandolin; Jake Sanders, guitar; Jared Engel, string bass) which I enjoyed at The Django on February 18.

That atmospherically-named spot is luxurious and evocative, in the lower level of the Roxy Hotel, 2 Avenue of the Americas, south of Canal Street.  It’s described as a “Gorgeous jazz & cocktail club in the cellar of The Roxy Hotel, NYC,” and that isn’t hyperbole.  The gentlemen in charge, Vito Dieterle and Joseph Schwartz, have done it splendidly — down to the lovely service and the delicately pickled fennel as part of a delicious cured meat-and-cheese plate.

Trio at The Django

Here are three selections from that evening’s banquet of swinging lyrical music.

WANG WANG BLUES:

WILLIE THE WEEPER:

PICKING THE GUITAR (a 1932 Nick Lucas opus):

The trio played much more music that night, and their repertoire was deliciously varied, but these three will do for the moment.

Incidentally, I asked Jake about his lovely guitar, and he told me, “It’s an M-14 National.  Mahogany veneer over plywood with 14 frets to the body.”  So now  you know.

And perhaps irrelevantly, I encountered this record label online (where else?) and was fascinated to know that this issue of this beloved song came complete with a comma:

Willie, The Weeper

One, never knows, do one?

May your happiness increase!

LOOK FOR THE SILVER LINING

It’s the title of a very pretty and optimistic 1920 show tune . . .

but it’s also a well-kept New York City secret — a serene below-stairs room in a 150-year old Tribeca brownstone.  The room is cozy — it holds fewer than 100 people — but it’s not cramped; there’s room for a first-rate piano and top-flight jazz improvisation. There is a menu of small plates and a very adventurous selection of cocktails.

The SILVER LINING is located at 75 Murray Street (between Greenwich and West Broadway): their phone is 212-513-1234; the website is thttp://silverliningbar.com/

I heard about Silver Lining first through the most reputable sources — the musicians themselves — who talked of a lovely room conducive to great playing.

And the musicians?  If you check the website, you’ll see fine and familiar names: Dan Block, Dan Aran, Ehud Asherie, Larry Ham, Jon-Erik Kellso, Ray Gallon, Ned Goold, Chris Flory, Sacha Perry, Eliot Zigmund, Jon Burr, Steve Ash, Spike Wilner.

The musicians are booked by Vito Dieterle — a splendid jazz player himself (a floating tenor saxophonist whose work I admired when he was playing alongside Claire Daly in Joel Forrester’s small group) — so I know things are going to go well.

Look for the Silver Lining!

LOOK FOR THE SILVER LINING

It’s always exciting to hear of a new club featuring jazz — and this one has all the right ingredients.  The music will be curated by tenor saxophonist Vito Dieterle, someone whose taste I trust.  (I heard Vito several times with Joel Forrester and Claire Daly: Vito’s a late Lestorian who likes to float his own melodies in the air — and a gracious fellow in addition.)  The club itself is inside a 154-year old Tribeca townhouse.  White tablecloths, interesting cocktails, beers, and wines.  A French chef creating small plates full of flavorful food.  A well-tuned piano.  And the best musicians in town.  I mean MUSICIANS.

On Wednesday, August 24, from 9 PM to midnight, Jon-Erik Kellso, Chris Flory, and Kelly Friesen will be there.  That’s a wonderful trio — capable of creating the best kind of seismic disturbances.

Appropriately, this new place is called SILVER LINING, and it’s on 75 Murray St. between Greenwich and West Broadway, 212.513.1234.

I’ll have more to say about looking for — and finding — this SILVER LINING — when we are back in New York City in September . . . and my spies tell me that Michael Kanan and friends will be there one night, too.

The room seats about 100, so you might want to inquire about reservations: enterprises like these are worth supporting.